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  • 1.
    Andersson Hagiwara, Magnus
    et al.
    University of Borås, PreHospen - Centre for Prehospital Research, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, Borås, Sweden.
    Wireklint Sundström, B.
    University of Borås, PreHospen - Centre for Prehospital Research, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, Borås, Sweden.
    Brink, Peter
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Avdelningen för omvårdnad - grundnivå.
    Herlitz, J.
    University of Borås, PreHospen - Centre for Prehospital Research, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, Borås, Sweden.
    Hansson, P. -O
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A shorter system delay for haemorrhagic stroke than ischaemic stroke among patients who use emergency medical service2018Ingår i: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 137, nr 5, s. 523-530Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives We compare various aspects in the early chain of care among patients with haemorrhagic stroke and ischaemic stroke. Materials & methods The Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and nine emergency hospitals, each with a stroke unit, were included. All patients hospitalised with a first and a final diagnosis of stroke between 15 December 2010 and 15 April 2011 were included. The primary endpoint was the system delay (from call to the EMS until diagnosis). Secondary endpoints were: (i) use of the EMS, (ii) delay from symptom onset until call to the EMS; (iii) priority at the dispatch centre; (iv) priority by the EMS; and (v) suspicion of stroke by the EMS nurse and physician on admission to hospital. Results Of 1336 patients, 172 (13%) had a haemorrhagic stroke. The delay from call to the EMS until diagnosis was significantly shorter in haemorrhagic stroke. The patient’s decision time was significantly shorter in haemorrhagic stroke. The priority level at the dispatch centre did not differ between the two groups, whereas the EMS nurse gave a significantly higher priority to patients with haemorrhage. There was no significant difference between groups with regard to the suspicion of stroke either by the EMS nurse or by the physician on admission to hospital. Conclusions Patients with a haemorrhagic stroke differed from other stroke patients with a more frequent and rapid activation of EMS.

  • 2.
    Ozanne, Anneli
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Johansson, D
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hällgren Graneheim, Ulla
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Avdelningen för omvårdnad - avancerad nivå. Umeå University, Department of Nursing, Umeå, Sweden.
    Malmgren, K
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bergquist, F
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Alt Murphy, M
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wearables in epilepsy and Parkinson's disease: A focus group study2018Ingår i: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 137, nr 2, s. 188-194Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Wearable sensors that measure movement and physiological variables are attractive for clinical evaluation of neurological diseases such as epilepsy and Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of this study was to explore perceptions regarding the use of wearable technology in disease monitoring and management as reported by individuals with epilepsy and Parkinson's disease as well as health professionals working with these patient groups.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Six patient groups (n=25) and two groups with health professionals (n=15) participated in this qualitative, descriptive study with focus group interviews. A manifest qualitative content analysis was used.

    RESULTS: Four categories and nine subcategories emerged from the analysis. Participants saw possible benefits for improved treatment effect and valued this benefit more than possible inconvenience of wearing the sensors. Discrete design and simplicity were considered as facilitators for improved usability. They emphasized the importance of interactive information between patients and health professionals. However, they were concerned about unclear information and inconclusive recordings and some fears about personal integrity were at odds with the expectations on interactivity.

    CONCLUSIONS: Patients need to feel well informed and find an added value in using wearables. Wearables need to be user-friendly, have an attractive design, and show clinical efficacy in improving disease management. Variations in perceptions regarding integrity, benefits, and effectiveness of monitoring indicate possible conflicts of expectations among participants. The engagement of end users, patients, and health professionals, in the design and implementation process, is crucial for the development of wearable devices that enhance and facilitate neurological rehabilitation practice.

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