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  • 1.
    Jothi, Sathiskumar
    et al.
    Swansea University Bay Campus, College of Engineering, Engineering East Building, Fabian Way, Swansea, United Kingdom.
    Merzlikin, S.V.
    Max-Planck-InstitutfürEisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Strae 1, Düsseldorf, Germany.
    Croft, T.N.
    Swansea University Bay Campus, College of Engineering, Engineering East Building, Fabian Way, Swansea, United Kingdom.
    Andersson, Joel
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mechanical Engineering.
    Brown, S.G.R.
    Swansea University Bay Campus, College of Engineering, Engineering East Building, Fabian Way, Swansea, United Kingdom.
    An investigation of micro-mechanisms in hydrogen induced cracking in nickel-based superalloy 7182016In: Journal of Alloys and Compounds, ISSN 0925-8388, E-ISSN 1873-4669, Vol. 664, p. 664-681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrogen embrittlement of the nickel-iron based superalloy 718 has been investigated using slow strain rate tests for pre-charged material and also in-situ hydrogen charging during testing. Fractography analyses have been carried using scanning electron microscopy, electron back-scattering diffraction and orientation image microscopy concentrating on the influence of microstructural features and associated micro-mechanisms leading to hydrogen induced cracking and embrittlement. It was observed that hydrogen induced transgranular cracking initiates at micro-voids in the crystal lattice. Similar behaviour has been observed in multi-scale finite element chemo-mechanical numerical simulations. In contrast, hydrogen induced localized slip intergranular cracking was associated with the formation of micro-voids in intergranular regions. The effects of grain boundary and triple junction character on intergranular hydrogen embrittlement were also investigated. It was observed that low end high angle misorientations (LHAM), 15°<Ξ ≀ 35°, and critical high angle misorientations (CHAM), 35° < 50°, are preferential sites for hydrogen induced cracking. In contrast, few or no hydrogen induced cracks were observed at low angle misorientations (LAM), 0°≀ Ξ le; 15°, high end high angle misorientations (HHAM), 50°<Ξ ≀ 55°, or special GB misorientations (SGB), Ξ > 55°. Finally, the use of grain boundary engineering techniques to increase the resistance of super alloy 718 to hydrogen induced cracking and embrittlement is discussed. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Kumar, Rajiv
    et al.
    IITB-Monash Research Academy, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076, India.
    Joardar, Joydip
    International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials, Hyderabad, India.
    Raman, R.K. Singh
    Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University, VIC 3800 Australia.
    Raja, V.S.
    Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076, India.
    Joshi, Shrikant
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials, Hyderabad, India.
    Parida, S.
    Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076, India.
    Effect of chromium and aluminum addition on anisotropic and microstructural characteristics of ball milled nanocrystalline iron2016In: Journal of Alloys and Compounds, ISSN 0925-8388, E-ISSN 1873-4669, Vol. 671, p. 164-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prior studies on synthesis of nanocrystalline elements have discussed the effect of ball milling on lattice parameter, crystallite size, and micro-strain. For elemental milled powders, the anisotropic peak broadening does not change with increasing milling time. However, the effect of alloying addition on the anisotropic behavior of ball milled nanocrystalline powders remains an unexplored area. Here we report the effect of chromium and aluminum addition on the anisotropic behavior of iron in nanocrystalline Fe–20Cr–5Al (wt%) alloy powders synthesized by ball milling. The experimental results show that the anisotropic behavior of iron changes towards isotropic with milling. This change was also correlated to the theoretically calculated anisotropic factor from the change in elastic constant of iron due to milling. Addition of alloying elements exhibited a monotonic rise in the lattice parameter with crystallite size, which was attributed to the excess grain boundary interfacial energy and excess free volume at grain boundaries. Transmission electron microscopy image confirmed the crystallite size and nature of dislocation obtained using modified Williamson-Hall method.

  • 3.
    Mahade, Satyapal
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Curry, Nicholas
    Treibacher Industrie AG, Austria.
    Björklund, Stefan
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Failure analysis of Gd2Zr2O7/YSZ multi-layered thermal barrier coatings subjected to thermal cyclic fatigue2016In: Journal of Alloys and Compounds, ISSN 0925-8388, E-ISSN 1873-4669, Vol. 689, p. 1011-1019Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    8 wt.% yttria stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) is the standard ceramic top coat material used in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) due to its excellent thermo-physical and thermo-mechanical properties. However, above 1200 °C, YSZ has issues such as susceptibility to CMAS (Calcium Magnesium Alumino Silicates) attack and enhanced sintering which could lead to catastrophic failure of the TBC. Pyrochlores of rare earth zirconate composition such as gadolinium zirconate have shown to be resistant to CMAS attack and at the same time possess several other attractive properties. However, poor thermal cycling life of single layer gadolinium zirconate (GZ) TBC compared to single layer YSZ has been reported. Therefore, a double layered GZ/YSZ TBC with YSZ as the intermediate coating and GZ as the top coat and a single layer 8YSZ were deposited by the axial suspension plasma spray process. Additionally, a triple layer TBC (GZdense/GZ/YSZ) comprising of denser GZ coating on top of GZ/YSZ TBC was deposited. SEM analysis revealed a columnar microstructure in the single, double and triple layer TBCs. XRD analysis confirmed the presence of tetragonal prime and defect fluorite phases in the top surface of YSZ and GZ based as sprayed TBCs respectively. The single layer YSZ and GZ/YSZ multi-layered TBCs were subjected to thermal cyclic fatigue (TCF) testing at 1100 °C and 1200 °C. The triple layer TBC showed a higher thermal cyclic life at both the temperatures compared to the single and double layer TBCs. The failed TBCs at 1100 °C were analyzed by SEM/EDS and image analysis. It was found that the failure modes in single layer YSZ and GZ based TBCs were different.

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