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  • 1.
    Eriksson, Monica
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Health and Culture.
    Lindström, Bengt
    Folkha¨lsan Research Centre, Helsingfors.
    From health education to healthy learning: Implementing salutogenesis in educational science 2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 39, no Suppl 6, p. 85-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     

     Aim:

    The aim is to scrutinise the concept of health education (HE) and to broaden the concept of health literacy (HL) towardsa lifelong healthy learning concept. HL is a broader concept than HE. This paper dissects both the health and the education

    concepts, and puts them into the value system of health promotion (HP) of the Ottawa Charter (OC) using the core principles

    and values of HP, HL, and action competence (AC) in the light of the salutogenesis (SAL). Conceptually the salutogenic

    model focuses on the direction towards the healthy end of the health continuum. The salutogenic theory, based on resources

    and comprehensibility, manageability, and meaningfulness, can be integrated into a learning model. People are seen as active

    and participating subjects shaping their lives through their AC.

    Method:a combination of an analysis of the values andintentions of health promotion according to the OC combined with the existing evidence on the salutogenic approach to

    health, stemming from a systematic research synthesis 1992–2003 and an ongoing analysis 2004–2009 by the authors. In

    addition, the views from a discussion with the participants of a session in the NHPR Conference 2009 are integrated.

    Results:

    The similarities and differences between the salutogenesis, theOCand healthy learning were shown in a graph. Integrating the

    salutogenesis in educational sciences further expands the concepts of HE and HL into healthy learning.

    Conclusions: Theresults of the discussions will further develop and strengthen the concept of healthy learning. 

     

    Abstract

    Aim: The aim is to scrutinise the concept of health education (HE) and to broaden the concept of health literacy (HL) towards

    a lifelong healthy learning concept. HL is a broader concept than HE. This paper dissects both the health and the education concepts, and puts them into the value system of health promotion (HP) of the Ottawa Charter (OC) using the core principles and values of HP, HL, and action competence (AC) in the light of the salutogenesis (SAL). Conceptually the salutogenic model focuses on the direction towards the healthy end of the health continuum. The salutogenic theory, based on resources and comprehensibility, manageability, and meaningfulness, can be integrated into a learning model. People are seen as active and participating subjects shaping their lives through their AC. Method: a combination of an analysis of the values and intentions of health promotion according to the OC combined with the existing evidence on the salutogenic approach to health, stemming from a systematic research synthesis 1992–2003 and an ongoing analysis 2004–2009 by the authors. In addition, the views from a discussion with the participants of a session in the NHPR Conference 2009 are integrated. Results: The similarities and differences between the salutogenesis, theOCand healthy learning were shown in a graph. Integrating the salutogenesis in educational sciences further expands the concepts of HE and HL into healthy learning. Conclusions

    : The results of the discussions will further develop and strengthen the concept of healthy learning.

  • 2.
    Forsman, Anna K
    et al.
    Åbo Akademi University, Faculty of Education and Welfare Studies, Vaasa, Finland.
    Fredén, Lars
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison for Health, Culture and Educational Sciences. University West, NU-akademin Väst.
    Lindqvist, Rafael
    Uppsala University, Department of Sociology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wahlbeck, Kristian
    The Finnish Association for Mental Health, Helsinki, Finland.
    Contribution of the Nordic School of Public Health to the public mental health research field: a selection of research initiatives, 2007-2014.2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 43, no 16 Suppl, p. 66-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of public mental health has been defined by an expert group convened by the Nordic School of Public Health (NHV) as encompassing the experience, occurrence, distribution and trajectories of positive mental health and mental health problems and their determinants; mental health promotion and prevention of mental disorders; as well as mental health system policies, governance and organization. The mental health priorities of the Nordic Council of Ministers in 2010 signalled a mutual Nordic exchange of knowledge in the following thematic areas: child and adolescent mental health; working life and mental health; mental health in older people; strengthening the role of primary care in mental health service provision; stronger involvement of users and carers; and reduction of use of coercion in psychiatric care. Efforts to realize these priorities included commissioning the Nordic Research Academy for Mental Health, an NHV-based network of research institutions with a common interest in mental health research across the Nordic countries, to develop, organize and follow-up projects on public mental health. The research initiatives included mental health policy analysis, register-based research and research focused on the users' perspective in a Nordic context, as well as EU-level research policy analysis. The public mental health research conducted at the NHV highlighted the complexity of mental health and emphasized that the broad determinants of mental health need to be increasingly addressed in both public health research and practice. For example, health promotion actions, improved access to health care, a healthy alcohol policy and prevention of suicides and violence are all needed to reduce the life expectancy gap - a red flag indicator of public health inequalities. By exchanging knowledge and best practice, the collaboration between the Nordic countries contributes to the welfare of the region. The expertise and traditions developed at the NHV are of significant importance in this work.

  • 3.
    Hansson, Anders
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care.
    Arvemo, Tobias
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Marklund, Bertil
    University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care.
    Gedda, Birgitta
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing.
    Mattsson, Bengt
    University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care.
    Working together - primary care doctors' and nurses' attitudes to collaboration2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 78-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Multidisciplinary teamwork is recommended for various disorders and it has been suggested that it is a way to meet the new challenges and demands facing general practitioners (GPs) in modern society. Attempts to introduce the method in primary care have failed partly due to GPs' unwillingness to participate. The aim of this study was to measure attitudes towards collaboration among GPs and district nurses (DN) and to investigate whether there is a correlation between a positive attitude toward collaboration and high self-esteem in the professional role. Methods: The Jefferson Scale of Attitudes toward Physician Nurse Collaboration and the Professional Self-Description Form (PSDF) was used to study a cohort of 600 GPs and DNs in Vastra Gotaland region. The purpose was to map differences and correlations of attitude between DNs and GPs, between male and female GPs, and between older and younger DNs and GPs. Results: Four hundred and one answers were received. DNs (mean 51.7) were significantly more positive about collaboration than GPs (mean 49.4). There was no difference between younger and older, male and female GPs. DNs scored higher on the PSDF-scale than GPs. Conclusions: DNs were slightly more positive about collaboration than GPs. A positive attitude towards collaboration did not seem to be a part of the GPs' professional role to the same extent as it is for DNs. Professional norms seem to have more influence on attitudes than do gender roles. DNs seem more confident in their profession than GPs.

  • 4.
    Massoudi, Pamela
    et al.
    Department of Research and Development, Region Kronoberg, Sweden, Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hwang, Philip
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. University of Gothenburg, Department of Psychology, Sweden.
    Wickberg, Birgitta
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fathers' depressive symptoms in the postnatal period: Prevalence and correlates in a population-based Swedish study2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 44, no 7, p. 688-694Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and correlates of depression in new fathers. Methods: A population-based sample of 885 Swedish fathers and their partners completed a questionnaire, including the EdinburghPostnatal Depression Scale at three months postpartum. Correlates of depressive symptoms were analysed with univariate andmultiple variable regression models. Results: Symptoms of depression were found in 6.3% of the fathers and 12.0% of themothers, and the point prevalence of major depression in fathers was 1.3%. The strongest correlates of depressive symptoms in fathers were problems in the partner relationship, a low educational level, previous depression, stressful life events and low partner support. The cross-sectional design could affect the magnitude of the results, and causal inferences cannot be made. Conclusions: Although the rate of depressive symptoms is lower in fathers than in mothers at three months postpartum, the associated factors are similar to those found in studies of mothers. The first visits at the childhealth centre could include a discussion with both parents about normal transition problems; balancing work,personal and family needs; and distress. When signs of distress or partner relationship difficulties are picked up,this should be followed up and support interventions offered.

  • 5.
    Povlsen, Lene
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark, Unit for Health Promotion Research, Denmark.
    Regber, Susann
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Sweden.
    Fosse, Elisabeth
    Bergen University, Department of Health Promotion and Development, Faculty of Psychology, Norway.
    Karlsson, Lena Eklund
    University of Southern Denmark, Unit for Health Promotion Research, Denmark.
    Gunnarsdottir, Hrafnhildur
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Economic poverty among children and adolescents in the Nordic countries2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 46, no 20_suppl, p. 30-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: This study aimed to identify applied definitions and measurements of economic poverty and to explore the proportionsand characteristics of children and adolescents living in economic poverty in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway andSweden during the last decade and to compare various statistics between the Nordic countries. Methods: Official data fromcentral national authorities on statistics, national reports and European Union Statistics of income and living conditionsdata were collected and analysed during 2015–2016. Results: The proportion of Nordic children living in economic povertyin 2014 ranged from 9.4% in Norway to 18.5% in Sweden. Compared with the European Union average, from 2004 to 2014Nordic families with dependent children experienced fewer difficulties in making their money last, even though Icelandicfamilies reported considerable difficulties. The characteristics of children living in economic poverty proved to be similar inthe five countries and were related to their parents' level of education and employment, single-parent households and – inDenmark, Norway and Sweden – to immigrant background. In Finland, poverty among children was linked in particular tolow income in employed households. Conclusions: This study showed that economic poverty among Nordic familieswith dependent children has increased during the latest decade, but it also showed that poverty rates are notnecessarily connected to families' ability to make their money last. Therefore additional studies are neededto explore existing policies and political commitments in the Nordic countries to compensate families withdependent children living in poverty.

  • 6.
    Schyllander, Jan
    et al.
    Swedish Civil Contingencies Agcy, Karlstad.
    Janson, Staffan
    Karlstad Univ, Div Publ Hlth Sci.
    Nyberg, Cecilia
    Karlstad Univ, Div Publ Hlth Sci.
    Eriksson, Ulla-Britt
    Karlstad Univ, Div Publ Hlth Sci.
    Ekman, Diana Stark
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Health and Culture.
    Case analyses of all children's drowning deaths occurring in Sweden 1998-20072013In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 174-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The goal of this research project was to explore circumstances surrounding each drowning death occurring to children and adolescents ages 0-17 in Sweden during the years 1998-2007. Methods: Records from the National Board of Forensic Medicine (NBFM) and other sources were analysed. We collected information on children's personal characteristics (sex, age, ethnic background, weight, height, physical condition, and pre-existing health conditions) and the circumstances of deaths (time and place of occurrence, type of drowning, resuscitation efforts and medical care given, for example). We also collected information on prevention factors: the physical environment, adult supervision, whether or not the child could swim, and if the child was using a personal flotation device at the time of death. Results: Our analysis showed that 109 children had drowned in Sweden during the study period - of this group, 96 had died from unintentional causes. Children from immigrant backgrounds, particularly with families coming from the Middle East and Iran, were inordinately represented in the group of victims who had died from unintentional drowning deaths. Other risk factors included: coming from a single parent-headed family, alcohol use by older victims and a lack of ability to swim. Conclusions: Prevention efforts to prevent drowning in the future should focus on preventing alcohol use by young bathers; better fencing around swimming sites; improved coverage of swimming lessons to all children in Sweden, especially children from immigrant families; more education on drowning risks for single parents; and better awareness by adults on the need for constant supervision of children and adolescents in and near water.

  • 7.
    Sjölander, Per
    et al.
    Southern Lapland Research Department, Vilhelmina.
    Hassler, Sven
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Health and Culture.
    Janlert, Urban
    Umeå University, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Stroke and acute myocardial infarction in the Swedish Sami population: incidence and mortality in relation to income and level of education2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 84-91Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Söderhamn, Ulrika
    et al.
    University of Agder, Center for Caring Research – Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, Grimstad, Norw.
    Sundsli, Kari
    Diakonhjemmet University College, Department of Social Welfare and Occupational therapy, Sandnes, Norway.
    Cliffordson, Christina
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison for Health, Culture and Educational Sciences.
    Dale, Bjørg
    University of Agder, Center for Caring Research – Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, Grimstad, Norw.
    Psychometric properties of Antonovsky's 29-item Sense of Coherence scale in research on older home-dwelling Norwegians.2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 867-874Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of this study was to test the homogeneity and construct validity of the Sense of Coherence 29-item scale (SOC-29) among older home-dwelling Norwegians.

    METHODS: A postal questionnaire, consisting of background variables, five health-related questions, the SOC-29, and three other instruments measuring mental health, self-care ability, and risk for undernutrition, was sent to 6033 home-dwelling older people (65+ years) in southern Norway. A total of 2069 participants were included. Homogeneity was assessed with Cronbach's alpha coefficient and item-to-total correlations. The construct validity was assessed with "the known-groups technique," a linear stepwise regression analysis with SOC score serving as the dependent variable and with confirmatory factor analysis.

    RESULTS: With a Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.91 and statistically significant item-to-total correlations, the SOC-29 was found to be homogeneous. Construct validity was supported because the SOC-29 could separate known groups with expected high and low scores. The factors that could predict SOC were mental health, self-care ability, feeling lonely, being active, and chronic disease or handicap. Evidence of construct validity was displayed in a confirmatory factor analysis that confirmed SOC-29 as one theoretical construct with the three dimensions, comprehensibility, manageability, and meaningfulness.

    CONCLUSIONS: The Norwegian version of the SOC-29 is a reliable and valid instrument for use in research among older people. The results confirm that SOC has a particularly strong relationship with mental health and self-care ability.

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