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  • 1.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Risk behaviour and noise exposure among adolescents2007In: Noise & Health, ISSN 1463-1741, E-ISSN 1998-4030, Vol. 9, no 36, p. 55-63Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Widen, Stephen E.
    Örebro University, Institute for Disability Research, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Risks and music - Patterns among young women and men in Sweden2011In: Noise & Health, ISSN 1463-1741, E-ISSN 1998-4030, Vol. 13, no 53, p. 310-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Music and high levels of sound have not traditionally been associated with risk-taking behaviors. Loud music may intensify and bring more power and meaning to the musical experience, but it can at the same time be harmful to hearing. The present study aims to increase the knowledge about young women′s and men′s risk judgement and behaviour by investigating patterns in adolescent risk activities among 310 adolescents aged 15-20 (143 women; 167 men). The Australian instrument ARQ was used with additional questions on hearing risks and a factor analysis was conducted. The main results showed that the factor structure in the judgement and behavior scale for Swedish adolescents was rather different from the factor structure in the Australian sample. Also, the factor structure was not similar to the Australian sample split on gender. The results are discussed from a gender- and existential perspective on risk taking, and it is emphasized that research on risk behavior needs to reconceptualize stereotypical ideas about gender and the existential period in adolescence.

  • 3.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies.
    Holgers, Kajsa-Mia
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Audiology.
    The impact of perceived tinnitus severity on health-related quality of life with aspects of gender.2001In: Noise & Health, ISSN 1463-1741, E-ISSN 1998-4030, Vol. 3, no 10, p. 39-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) has been used to investigate the health profiles in different medical conditions. It has, however, never been applied to tinnitus sufferers. The present study aimed at investigating relationships between the perceived severity of tinnitus, audiometric data, age, gender and non-disease specific health-related quality of life measured with the NHP divided into two sections; NHP I (topics related to health status) and NHP II (health induced problems in daily life). These parameters were statistically analysed to identify predictive factors to the perceived severity of tinnitus, described by the Tinnitus Severity Questionnaire (TSQ). A total of 186 consecutive tinnitus patients (57 females and 129 males) attending an audiological specialist clinic in Sweden were included in the study. The stepwise regression model used explained 37.8 per cent of the variance in the perceived severity of tinnitus, and the significant predictors were: "Emotions", "Sleep", and "Pain", three of the six dimensions of the NHP I. Differences between gender were found in NHP II and age-related differences emerged in NHP I when male and female patients were compared to normal controls.

  • 4.
    Olsen-Widén, Stephen
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Self-reported tinnitus and noise sensitivity among adolescents in Sweden2004In: Noise & Health, ISSN 1463-1741, E-ISSN 1998-4030, Vol. 7, no 25, p. 29-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It seems to be a common opinion among researchers within the field of audiology that the prevalence of tinnitus will increase as a consequence of environmental factors, for example exposure to loud noise. Young people are exposed to loud sounds, more than any other age group, especially during leisure time activities, i.e. at pop concerts, discotheques and gyms. A crucial factor for the prevention of hearing impairments and hearing-related symptoms in the young population is the use of hearing protection. The focus of the present study is use of hearing protection and self-reported hearing-related symptoms, such as tinnitus and noise sensitivity in a young population of high-school students (N=1285), aged 13 to 19 years. The results show that the prevalence of permanent tinnitus and noise sensitivity, reported in the total group, was 8.7% and 17.1% respectively. Permanent tinnitus was not significantly related to level of socio-economic status, but age-related differences in the prevalence rates of experienced tinnitus and noise sensitivity were found to be significant. Older students reported such symptoms to a greater extent than younger students did. Those who reported tinnitus and other hearing-related symptoms protected their hearing to the highest extent and were the ones most worried.

  • 5.
    Olsen-Widén, Stephen
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    The influence of socio-economic status on adolescent attitude to social noise and hearing protection2004In: Noise & Health, ISSN 1463-1741, E-ISSN 1998-4030, Vol. 7, no 25, p. 59-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of the present study, of 1285 adolescents, was young people's attitudes towards noise and their use of hearing protection at discos and pop concerts. Comparisons were made between adolescents from different age groups, and with different socio-economic status. Logistic regressions indicated that "worry before attending noisy activities" and "hearing symptoms" such as tinnitus and noise sensitivity could, to some degree, explain the use of hearing protection in noisy environments. Another conclusion to be drawn from this study was that adolescents' attitudes and behaviors regarding hearing protection use differed between levels of socio-economic status. Individuals with high SES expressed more negative attitudes and used ear protection to a greater extent than those with lower SES. This result might indicate differences in the development of future auditory problems among individuals with different levels of socio-economic status. The cause of hearing impairment and tinnitus may not be restricted merely to noise exposure. Psychological aspects, such as attitudes towards noisy environments and the individual's behavior regarding the use of hearing protection may be considered as important factors in the understanding of why the prevalence of hearing­ related problems has increased among adolescents.

  • 6.
    Widén, Stephen E.
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies.
    Erlandsson, Soly I
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Self-reported tinnitus and noise sensitivity among adolescents in Sweden2004In: Noise & Health, ISSN 1463-1741, E-ISSN 1998-4030, Vol. 7, no 25, p. 29-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It seems to be a common opinion among researchers within the field of audiology that the prevalence of tinnitus will increase as a consequence of environmental factors, for example exposure to loud noise. Young people are exposed to loud sounds, more than any other age group, especially during leisure time activities, i.e. at pop concerts, discotheques and gyms. A crucial factor for the prevention of hearing impairments and hearing-related symptoms in the young population is the use of hearing protection. The focus of the present study is use of hearing protection and self-reported hearing-related symptoms, such as tinnitus and noise sensitivity in a young population of high-school students (N=1285), aged 13 to 19 years. The results show that the prevalence of permanent tinnitus and noise sensitivity, reported in the total group, was 8.7% and 17.1% respectively. Permanent tinnitus was not significantly related to level of socio-economic status, but age-related differences in the prevalence rates of experienced tinnitus and noise sensitivity were found to be significant. Older students reported such symptoms to a greater extent than younger students did. Those who reported tinnitus and other hearing-related symptoms protected their hearing to the highest extent and were the ones most worried.

1 - 6 of 6
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