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  • 1.
    Ahlm, Kristin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Section of Forensic Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Hassler, Sven
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Health and Culture.
    Sjölander, Per
    Högskolan i Gävle och Södra Lapplands Forskningsenhet.
    Eriksson, Anders
    Umeå University, Section of Forensic Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Unnatural deaths in reindeer-herding Sami families in Sweden, 1961-20012010In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 69, no 2, p. 129-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. Unnatural deaths among Indigenous populations, including the Swedish Sami, occur more often than among the general population. To find prevention strategies, we explored the circumstances of the unnatural deaths of members of reindeer-herding Sami families. Study design. The number of deaths from among a cohort of 7,482 members of reindeer-herding Sami families were retrieved from the National Board of Health and Welfare for the years 1961- 2001. Methods. An evaluation of the information from autopsy records at the National Board of Forensic Medicine, police reports, and available medical records identified 158 unnatural deaths. These were then analysed in detail. Results. Transport-related deaths and suicides were the most common unnatural deaths among Swedish reindeer-herding Sami family members. Suicides contributed to 23% of all deaths, road traffic accidents to 16%, and snowmobile fatalities to 11%. The accidents generally reflected an "outdoor lifestyle" and the working conditions were characterized by the use of off-road vehicles such as snowmobiles. Half of the number of victims tested positive for alcohol and alcohol abuse was documented in 15% of all victims. Conclusions. The results indicate that alcohol is an important factor in preventing unnatural deaths among reindeer-herding Sami, together with increased safety of both on-road and off-road transportation.

  • 2.
    Hassler, Sven
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Health and Culture.
    Eklund, Leena
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison for Health, Culture and Educational Sciences.
    Sense of coherence and self-reported health among Roma people in Sweden: a pilot study2012In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 71, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The Roma people have been known in Europe for a 1000 years, during which they have usually been the subject of discrimination and oppression leading to isolation, powerlessness and poor health. The objective of this study is to investigate the sense of coherence (SOC) in relation to self-reported health among a group of Roma people in southwest Sweden.

    STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional, quantitative pilot study.

    METHODS: A questionnaire was constructed based on the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12) and Antonovsky's Sense of Coherence Scale (SOC-13) and was distributed among Roma people in southwest Sweden (n =102). Self-reported health was summarised in a physical score (PCS) and a mental score (MCS). Comparisons were made with a general Swedish majority population and a Sami population.

    RESULTS: The health scores were significantly lower among the Roma people compared to Swedes - PCS: Roma 46.0 (Swedes 52.0) and MCS: Roma 47.5 (Swedes 52.6). The SOC score for the Roma people (54.4) was significantly lower than that of the Swedes (65.2) and Sami (65.0).

    CONCLUSIONS: The low SOC with the Swedish majority society is a strong indication of the marginalisation and exclusion of the Roma people from mainstream society. Low scores in self-reported health among the Roma people also establishes the serious health risks the Roma people are experiencing through their present life situation.

  • 3.
    Hassler, Sven
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Health and Culture.
    Soininen, Leena
    Arctic Centre, Rovaniemi, Finland.
    Sjölander, Per
    University of Gävle, Center for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Pukkola, Eero
    University of Tampere, School of Public Health, Finland.
    Cancer among the sami: A review on the norwegian, swedish and finnish sami populations2008In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 67, no 5, p. 421-432Article, review/survey (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. The Sami are the Indigenous people of the northernmost parts of Sweden, Finland and Norway, and of the Kola Peninsula of Russia. The present review summarizes the main results from studies on cancer morbidity and mortality among the Sami and discusses these results in relation to exposure of known risk factors. Study Design. Literature review. Methods. A systematic search over the time period 1966–2008for relevant articles was conducted on MEDLINE. Updates and recalculations of some of the results from the original data were also done. Results. Nine articles whose main focus is on cancer incidence or mortality among the Sami were identified. In all studies, the overall incidence of cancer or cancer mortality was lower among the Sami in comparison with the national populations. The differences were less striking in relation to regional reference populations, but the rates were still significantly lower for all populations of Sami, except for Swedish Sami women. Beyond the general trend of a lower cancer incidence among the Sami, there were some notable differences between the various Sami subpopulations.

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