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  • 1.
    Gunnarsdottir, Hrafnhildur
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. Univ Gothenburg,, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hensing, G.
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hammarstrom, A.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Uppsala, Sweden, Stockholm Univ, Stress Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    School connectedness and adult depressiveness, longitudinal study of the Northern Swedish Cohort2019In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 29, no 4 suppl., article id ckz187.058Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to use Bronfenbrenner’s ecological theory to investigate adolescents’ school connectedness and family climate as potential predictors of depressiveness in adulthood.

  • 2.
    Gunnarsdottir, Hrafnhildur
    et al.
    University West, NU-akademin Väst. University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Hensing, Gunnel
    School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Hammarström, Anne
    Unit of Occupational Medicine, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (SWE);Department of Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, Umeå (SWE) .
    Poor school connectedness in adolescence and adulthood depressiveness: a longitudinal theory-driven study from the Northern Sweden Cohort2021In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 797-802Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Foundations for mental health are laid early in family and school life. Family climate embraces the emotional connections within a family, and school connectedness embraces both functional and affective dimensions of relationship with school. Based on the lack of theory-driven and longitudinal epidemiological studies addressing public mental health, the aim of this longitudinal study was to investigate the associations between adolescents’ school connectedness, family climate and depressiveness in adulthood, by relying on Bronfenbrenner’s ecological theory.

    Methods:The data are from the Northern Swedish Cohort, and the sample consists of 481 women and 526 men born in 1965 who participated in data collection at age 16, 21, 30 and 43. The generalized linear model method with random intercepts was used to examine the associations between family climate and school connectedness and depressiveness in adulthood.

    Results: Poor school connectedness was associated with depressiveness in adulthood [β = 0.038 (95% CI 0.018–0.058) P ≤ 0.001], but poor family climate was not [β = 0.014 (95% CI −0.004–0.032)]. No difference in associations was observed between those experiencing social/material adversities in adolescence.

    Conclusions: This study shows that poor school connectedness in adolescence can affect depressiveness in adulthood. The study confirms the complex processes that determine mental health and proposes a theoretical approach appealing to public mental health research. In addition, this study concludes that more life-course studies are needed to advance the knowledge of the mechanisms behind the associations between family climate and school connectedness and depressiveness in adulthood.

    Download full text (pdf)
    EJPH
  • 3.
    Gunnarsdottir, Hrafnhildur
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level. University West, NU-akademin Väst. University of Gothenburg, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Section of Social Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hensing, Gunnel
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Section of Social Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Povlsen, Lene
    University of Southern Denmark, Unit for Health Promotion Research, Esbjerg, Denmark.
    Petzold, Max
    University of Gothenburg, Health Metrics at Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Relative deprivation in the Nordic countries-child mental health problems in relation to parental financial stress2016In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 277-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:  The Nordic welfare system has been acknowledged as favourable for children, successfully contributing to low child mortality and poverty rates. Nevertheless, mental health problems among children and adolescents are common and the economic situation of the family has been highlighted as an important determinant. In spite of similar social, political and cultural structures, the Nordic countries differ; Iceland was most affected by the global financial crisis in 2008. The aim of this study was to examine potential differences in parental financial stress and the associations to child mental health between the Nordic countries as well as age and gender differences.  METHODS:  The study sample consisted of 6330 children aged 4-16 years old included in the 2011 version of the Nordic Study of Children's Health, Wellbeing and Quality of life. The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire was used to measure mental health problems.  RESULTS:  In Iceland, 47.7% of the parents reported financial stress while ≤20% did so in the other countries except for Finland (33.5%). However, in case of parental financial stress the OR of mental health problems comparing children to parents with and without financial stress was significantly lower among the Icelandic children (OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.15-2.24) than among the others: Denmark OR 3.07 (95% CI 2.15-4.39), Finland OR 2.28 (95% CI 1.60-3.25), Norway OR 2.77 (95% CI 1.86-4.12), Sweden OR 3.31(95% CI 2.26-4.86). No significant age or gender differences in the ORs were observed.  CONCLUSIONS:  Besides socioeconomic situation, relative deprivation should be considered an important determinant of child mental health.

  • 4.
    Löve, J
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mehlig, K
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Källström, Å
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro,Sweden.
    Hensing, G
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gunnarsdottir, Hrafnhildur
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. University of Gothenburg, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Parents' socioeconomic position, psychological problems, and emotional neglect in childhood2019In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 29, no Supplement 4, p. 365-366, article id ckz187.182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite high prevalence and severe consequences for health and wellbeing, emotional neglect (EN) in childhood is a neglected topic in epidemiological research. To enable prevention of neglect knowledge is important about conditions related to EN such as parental individual characteristics and social/economic situation. Aim to investigate the relationship between parental socioeconomic position (SEP), psychological problems, and EN in childhood.The sample comprised Swedish women, N = 976, mean age 22. EN was assessed by five indicators: maternal/paternal rejection, maternal/paternal lack of time, and occurrence of domestic violence. The associations between parental SEP/psychological problems and EN were examined by logistic regressions.The odds of experiencing domestic violence in childhood was higher among women with parents with low (OR 3.1 95% CI 1.1-8.5) or medium SEP (OR 3.4 95% CI 1.7-6.9). Women who reported maternal psychological problems had higher odds of maternal rejection (OR 6.8 95% CI 3.5-13.0), maternal lack of time (OR 2.4 95% CI 1.2-5.0) and paternal rejection (OR 1.9 95% CI 1.1-3.5). Women who reported paternal psychological problems had higher odds of perceiving their father as rejecting (OR 4.0 95% CI 2.1-7.7), not having enough time for them (OR 4.9 95% CI 2.3-10.6), and experiencing domestic violence (OR 4.9 95% CI 2.1-11.6).Lower SES was not related to EN in form of parental rejection or lack of time but to the occurrence of domestic violence. Parental psychological problems were related to all indicators of EN but differently among mothers and fathers. Public health initiatives aiming at supporting parents should also embrace parental psychological wellbeing.Emotional neglect was clearly related to parental psychological problems but not parental socioeconomic status.Gendered structures need to be considered in studies of emotional neglect.

  • 5.
    Tengelin, Ellinor
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Hensing, G.
    Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Holmgren, K.
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Ståhl, C.
    Division of Education and Sociology, Linköping University, Linköping (SWE).
    Bertilsson, M.
    Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Managers’ experience-based understanding of capacity to work in workers with common mental disorders2021In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 31, no Suppl 3, p. 458-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    The capacity to work among workers with common mental disorders (CMD) is important to understand but scarcely explored from a manager perspective, even though their views could add essential knowledge. The aim of this study was to explore and describe managers’ experience-based understand[1]ing of capacity to work in individuals with CMD.

    Methods:

    This qualitative focus group study used inductive manifest content analysis as analytic technique. First-line managers with experiences of employees with CMDs were recruited via organizations and networks. Eight focus group interviews with altogether 31 participants were performed.

    Results:

    The analysis resulted in five categories of managers’ experi[1]ence-based understanding of occupational functioning in workers with CMDs: (1) The capacity to mentally focus on work tasks decreases or disappears, with negative consequences for work output. (2) The capacity to commit to continuous and coherent tasks changes, making tasks that span over longer periods of time difficult. (3) The capacity to independently adapt to the needs of the situation decreases, causing the worker to need more guidance and instructions than usual. (4) The capacity to keep up professional appearances is reduced, meaning that the worker struggle with the profes[1]sional role. Finally, (5) the ability to interact socially and professionally decreases, which potentially causes conflicts at the workplace.

    Conclusions:

    This study shows managers’ experience-based understanding of CMDs in workers as severe changes and reductions of employees’ capacities needed for occupational functioning. These findings add to the understanding of the construction of the capacity at the workplace. A deeper understanding of reduced work capacity is also needed to adapt workplaces and our findings can facilitate work accommodations for employ[1]ees with CMDs.

    Key messages:

    • This study adds a manager perspective to the increasing knowledge about how capacity to work is influenced by CMD. 
    • This study shows that managers experience that CMD in workers severely change and reduce employees’ capacities needed for occupational functioning.
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