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  • 1.
    Holmgren, Daniel
    et al.
    Department of Pediatrics, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden / Institute of Clinical Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Skyvell Nilsson, Maria
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Wekell, Per
    Department of Pediatrics, NU-Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden / Institute of Clinical Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Combining learning for educators and participants in a paediatric CPD programme2019In: BMC Medical Education, ISSN 1472-6920, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Most continuing professional development (CPD) programmes do not include an educational training module. In our country, educational practice in the areas of CPD and continuing medical education relies traditionally on conventional lectures. This is in sharp contrast to the educational research that clearly demonstrates that educational programmes emphasising adult learning methods have greater potential to change physicians'clinical practice. To investigate whether lecture-oriented educators were prepared to change their educational practice towards principles of adult learning, we decided to combine learning for educators and participants in a paediatric CPD programme.The aim of the study was to investigate educators' reflections on their learning and educational practice after they have undergone an educational skills component integrated in the implementation of a CPD learning module for paediatricians and evaluate the results from the participants' perspective.

    Methods: The objectives of the educational skills component of the learning module were developed according to adult learning theories. The learning objectives for the CPD learning module were based on a pre-course needs assessment. Evaluations were made using questionnaires.

    Results: Seven of 10 participants in the educational skills component of the learning module and all the participants, 13 paediatricians and 14 nurses, who participated in the learning module, answered the questionnaires.The results of this pilot study show that educators whose main experience of teaching was based on lectures were strengthened in their practice; they defined their competence and were prepared to move towards adult learning principles. The participants in the learning module expressed a high degree of satisfaction.

    Conclusions: We conclude that it is feasible to combine learning for educators and participants in a paediatric CPD programme and that lecture-oriented educators are prepared to change their educational practice towards principles of adult learning.

  • 2.
    Skyvell Nilsson, Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, undergraduate level.
    Pennbrant, Sandra
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.
    Pilhammar, Ewa
    University of Gothenburg.
    Wenestam, Claes-Göran
    Kristianstad University College, School of Teacher Education.
    Pedagogical Strategies Used in Clinical Medical Education: An Observational Study2010In: BMC Medical Education, ISSN 1472-6920, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 10, no 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:  Clinical teaching is a complex learning situation influenced by the learning content, the setting and the participants' actions and interactions. Few empirical studies have been conducted in order to explore how clinical supervision is carried out in authentic situations. In this study we explore how clinical teaching is carried out in a clinical environment with medical students.

    Methods:  Following an ethnographic approach looking for meaning patterns, similarities and differences in how clinical teachers manage clinical teaching; non-participant observations and informal interviews were conducted during a four month period 2004-2005. The setting was at a teaching hospital in Sweden. The participants were clinical teachers and their 4th year medical students taking a course in surgery. The observations were guided by the aim of the study. Observational notes and notes from informal interviews were transcribed after each observation and all data material was analysed qualitatively.

    Results:  Seven pedagogical strategies were found to be applied, namely: 1) Questions and answers, 2) Lecturing, 3) Piloting, 4) Prompting, 5) Supplementing, 6) Demonstrating, and 7) Intervening.

    Conclusions:  This study contributes to previous research in describing a repertoire of pedagogical strategies used in clinical education. The findings showed that three superordinate qualitatively different ways of teaching could be identified that fit Ramsden's model. Each of these pedagogical strategies encompass different focus in teaching; either a focus on the teacher's knowledge and behaviour or the student's behaviour and understanding. We suggest that an increased awareness of the strategies in use will increase clinical teachers' teaching skills and the consequences they will have on the students' ability to learn. The pedagogical strategies need to be considered and scrutinized in further research in order to verify their impact on students' learning.

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