Change search
Refine search result
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Arveklev Höglund, Susanna
    et al.
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Box 457, 40530 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Wigert, Helena
    nstitute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Box 457, 40530 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Berg, Linda
    nstitute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Box 457, 40530 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Burton, Bruce
    Griffith University, Mt. Gravatt Campus, Queensland, Australia.
    Lepp, Margret
    Østfold University College, Halden, Norway.
    The use and application of drama in nursing education: An integrative review of the literature2015In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, no 7, p. e12-e17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Caring is grounded on universal humanistic values such as kindness, empathy, concern and love for self and others. Nurses need to learn how to implement these values in the care for patients. Nursing students find it hard to assimilate theoretical knowledge in practice. Experiential learning in the form of drama has been used in several studies to enhance nursing students' learning. Aim The aim of this study was to review empirical and theoretical articles on the use and application of drama in nursing education. Design An integrative review of the literature.MethodThe databases CINAHL, PubMed, ProQuest and Academic search elite were searched for articles. Result The search generated 64 articles, with 20 articles meeting the inclusive criteria. Three themes with their attendant subthemes emerged through the analysis. The themes are: The Framing, The Objectives and The Embodiment. Conclusion Drama is effective in entry level courses in nursing education to enhance student learning and can be flexible and adjusted to various contexts. Further research using drama to enroll nursing students as fictive patients and relatives and thereby explore different perspectives is suggested, and more research on the application of drama in nursing education at an advanced level is required.

  • 2.
    Hällgren Graneheim, Ulla
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Lindgren, Britt-Marie
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lundman, Berit
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing, Umeå, Sweden.
    Methodological challenges in qualitative content analysis: A discussion paper.2017In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 56, p. 29-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This discussion paper is aimed to map content analysis in the qualitative paradigm and explore common methodological challenges. We discuss phenomenological descriptions of manifest content and hermeneutical interpretations of latent content. We demonstrate inductive, deductive, and abductive approaches to qualitative content analysis, and elaborate on the level of abstraction and degree of interpretation used in constructing categories, descriptive themes, and themes of meaning. With increased abstraction and interpretation comes an increased challenge to demonstrate the credibility and authenticity of the analysis. A key issue is to show the logic in how categories and themes are abstracted, interpreted, and connected to the aim and to each other. Qualitative content analysis is an autonomous method and can be used at varying levels of abstraction and interpretation.

  • 3.
    Pennbrant, Sandra
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.
    Skyvell Nilsson, Maria
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, undergraduate level.
    Öhlén, Joakim
    University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health Care Sciences.
    Rudman, Ann
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience.
    Mastering the professional role as a newly graduated registered nurse2013In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 33, no 7, p. 739-745Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Professional development is a process starting during undergraduate education and continuing throughout working life. A new nurse's transition from school to work has been described as difficult. This study aims to develop a model describing the professional development of new nurses during their first years of work. To develop this model, constant comparative analyses were performed. The method was a qualitative study of survey data on 330 registered nurses. The results showed that mastering the professional role was the result of an ongoing process building on the nurse's experiences and interactions with the surrounding environment. The professional developmental process involves the following interrelated sub-processes: evaluating and re-evaluating educational experiences, developing professional self-efficacy and developing clinical competence. These sub-processes are influenced by the following factors: social values and norms, healthcare organization, management of new nurses, co-workers, patients and significant others and the nurse's own family and friends. These factors affect professional development directly, indirectly or as mediating influences and can lead to possible outcomes, as new nurses choose to remain in or leave the profession. The results underscore the importance of developing a professional nursing role within the new working context. To facilitate this professional development, new nurses need support from their nursing-school educators and their healthcare employers. The model described here will be the subject of further measurement and testing. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 4.
    Rejnö, Åsa
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. Stroke Unit, Skaraborg Hospital, 541 85 Skövde, Sweden.
    Nordin, Per
    The Skaraborg Institute for Research and Development, Skövde, Sweden.
    Forsgren, Susanne
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Sundell, Yvonne
    University West, Department of Health Sciences.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. Nord University, Faculty of Professional Studies, Bodø, Norway.
    Nursing students’ attendance at learning activities in relation to attainment and passing courses: a prospective quantitative study2017In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 50, no March, p. 36-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Students' motivation and ways of engaging in their schoolwork are important for their performance, including passing exams. Attendance at learning activities has also been argued to be of major importance, although no causal relationship with passing exams has been established in nursing education.

    Objectives

    The aim of this study was to describe the impact of attendance at nonmandatory learning activities on attainment, in terms of passing or failing of exams, in nursing education courses including both mandatory and non-mandatory activities.

    Design

    A prospective quantitative design.

    Setting

    The nursing education programme at a Swedish university.

    Participants

    Nursing students (n = 361) from two courses and four classes within the nursing programme.

    Methods

    Attendance was registered at every non-mandatory teaching activity by asking the students to note their attendance on a list. Data such as sex, age, and whether the students had passed the exam were also collected for each course and each semester separately.

    Results

    Increased participation was associated with an increasing proportion of students passing the exam. The chance of passing the exam increased by 13% for every additional learning occasion attended. Logistic regression showed an OR of 5.4 for an attendance of 100%.

    Conclusions

    An increase in attendance gave a higher proportion of exam passes. Encouraging students to attend non-mandatory learning activities could be of value, and potentially contribute to an increased graduation rate for nursing students.

  • 5. Söderhamn, Olle
    et al.
    Lindencrona, C
    National Board of Health and Welfare, Stockholm.
    Gustavsson, Siw Merit
    University West, Department of Nursing.
    Attitudes toward older people among nursing students and registered nurses in Sweden2001In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 225-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Geriatric nursing is generally not considered to be a popular branch of nursing among Swedish nursing students and registered nurses. It is, therefore, important for nurse educators and others with responsibilities for the development of nursing to pay attention to trends of importance for the care of the elderly. Attitudes - conceptualized as feelings, knowledge, and readiness to act - may be one important factor. It has been reported that feelings toward older people may change with experience, age and gender. The aim of this study was to measure feelings toward older people among nursing students and registered nurses. A convenience sample of 151 undergraduate nursing students and 41 registered nurses in Sweden participated in the study. Data were collected through Kogan's Old People scale. The results confirmed earlier findings and showed that limited previous experience of care of older people, age <25 years, and male gender were significant factors for showing less favourable feelings towards the aged. In the education of nurses, goal-directed experience of elderly care is recommended in order to create positive feelings towards and interest in older people among students. It is also suggested that special considerations should be given to very young students and male students.

1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf