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  • 1.
    Barimani, Mia
    et al.
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Division of Reproductive Health, Karolinska Institutet, Re tsius väg 13 A, SE:17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages. Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Rosander, M.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Berlin, A,
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Childbirth and parenting preparation in antenatal classes2018In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 57, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: to describe topics (1) presented by midwives' during antenatal classes and the amount of time spent on these topics and (2) raised and discussed by first-time parents and the amount of time spent on these topics. Design: qualitative; data were gathered using video or tape recordings and analysed using a three-pronged content analysis approach, i.e., conventional, summative, and directed analyses. Setting and participants: 3 antenatal courses in 2 antenatal units in a large Swedish city; 3 midwives; and 34 course participants. Findings: class content focused on childbirth preparation (67% of the entire antenatal course) and on parenting preparation (33%). Childbirth preparation facilitated parents' understanding of the childbirth process, birthing milieu, the partner's role, what could go wrong during delivery, and pain relief advantages and disadvantages. Parenting preparation enabled parents to (i) plan for those first moments with the newborn; (ii) care for/physically handle the infant; (iii) manage breastfeeding; (iv) manage the period at home immediately after childbirth; and (v) maintain their relationship. During the classes, parents expressed concerns about what could happened to newborns. Parents' questions to midwives and discussion topics among parents were evenly distributed between childbirth preparation (52%) and parenting preparation (48%). Key conclusions: childbirth preparation and pain relief consumed 67% of course time. Parents particularly reflected on child issues, relationship, sex, and anxiety. Female and male participants actively listened to the midwives, appeared receptive to complex issues, and needed more time to ask questions. Parents appreciated the classes yet needed to more information for managing various post-childbirth situations. Implications for practice: while midwifery services vary among hospitals, regions, and countries, midwives might equalise content focus, offer classes in the second trimester, provide more time for parents to talk to each other, allow time in the course plan for parents to bring up new topics, and investigate: (i) ways in which antenatal course development and planning can improve; (ii) measures for evaluating courses; (iii) facilitator training; and (iv) parent satisfaction surveys.

  • 2.
    Nyman, Viola M K
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Advanced Nursing.
    Prebensen, Asa K
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Advanced Nursing.
    Flensner, Gullvi E M
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Advanced Nursing.
    Obese women's experiences of encounters with midwives and physicians during pregnancy and childbirth.2010In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 424-429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: to describe obese women's experiences of encounters with midwives and physicians during pregnancy and childbirth. DESIGN: a qualitative study using a phenomenological approach. Data were collected by means of interviews that were tape-recorded. SETTING: the women's homes or at a hospital in western Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: 10 women with body mass index >30, three primiparous and seven multiparous, who had given birth at a hospital in western Sweden in the period between October 2006 and September 2007 were interviewed four to six weeks after childbirth. FINDINGS: the meaning of being both obese and pregnant is living with a constant awareness of the body, and its constant exposure to the close observation and scrutiny of others. It involves negative emotions and experiences of discomfort. Feelings of discomfort increase as a result of humiliating treatment, whilst affirmative encounters alleviate discomfort and provide a sense of wellbeing. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: obese pregnant women are a vulnerable group because obesity is highly visible. Caregivers tend to focus on providing care to obese patients somatically, but are additionally in need of knowledge about care from the woman's point of view. Many obese women have negative experiences of health care that they have to overcome. It is necessary to individualise care for obese pregnant women, which involves taking time to give the women an opportunity to tell their own story. Caregivers have to promote health but it has to be done honestly and respectfully. In order to avoid judgemental attitudes and causing increased suffering for obese pregnant women, midwives and physicians need to be conscious of, reflect upon and verbalise their own attitudes and power.

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