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  • 1.
    Alsén, Pia
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för omvårdnad, hälsa och kultur, Avd för vårdvetenskap på grundnivå. Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Avdelningen för omvårdnad - avancerad nivå.
    Brink, Eva
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för omvårdnad, hälsa och kultur, Avd för specialistsjuksköterskeutbildning.
    Fatigue after myocardial infarction - a two-year follow-up study2013Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 22, nr 11-12, s. 1647-1652Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: To investigate changes in self-reported fatigue and depression from four months to two years following a myocardial infarction, as well as to explore gender differences, identify the incidence of fatigue without coexisting depression and finally predict health-related quality of life at a two-year follow-up. Background: Depression and fatigue are associated with decreased health-related quality of life after myocardial infarction. Although there is a close relationship between fatigue and depression, it has been shown that symptoms of fatigue can occur without coexisting depression. Design: Quantitative and longitudinal design. Methods: Participants (n = 155) were asked to complete the following questionnaires: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory-20 (MFI-20) and the Short Form Survey (SF-36) following myocardial infarction (after four months and two years). Descriptive statistics, paired t-tests and multiple regressions were carried out. Results: In the entire group, self-reported fatigue had decreased from four months to two years after myocardial infarction. After two years, 18% of respondents reported depression together with fatigue and 30% reported fatigued without depression. Women scored higher than men on the fatigue dimensions reduced activity, reduced motivation and mental fatigue. Moreover, the physical dimension of health-related quality of life two years after myocardial infarction was predicted by experienced general fatigue at four months. Conclusion: Fatigue with or without coexisting possible/probable depression remains as a significant symptom two years after myocardial infarction in nearly half of the entire group. Relevance to clinical practice: Fatigue is a problem following myocardial infarction. Therefore, systematic screening and early identification of patients experiencing symptoms of depression and fatigue after myocardial infarction are important for suitable care planning. In contemporary coronary care, strategies aimed at relieving fatigue should be developed. ᅵ 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 2.
    Alsén, Pia
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för omvårdnad, hälsa och kultur, Avd för sjuksköterskeutbildning.
    Brink, Eva
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för omvårdnad, hälsa och kultur, Avd för specialistsjuksköterskeutbildning.
    Persson, Lars-Olof
    Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Institute of Health and Care Sciences.
    Patients' illness perception four months after a myocardial infarction.2008Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 17, nr 5A, s. 25-33Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to explore patients' illness perception of myocardial infarction four months after a myocardial infarction. BACKGROUND: An important task for research on recovery from myocardial infarction is to understand the factors that influence an individual's adherence to secondary preventive strategies. Perceptual, cognitive and motivational factors have been found to influence adherence to a secondary preventive regimen. METHOD: Twenty-five patients were interviewed four months after a myocardial infarction. In accordance with grounded theory methodology, data collection and analysis were carried out simultaneously. RESULTS: The findings can be understood in light of two core categories: 'trust in oneself ' vs. 'trust in others'; belief in one's own efforts to control the illness; and 'illness reasoning', lines of thought about illness identity. In searching for relationships, six categories describing variation in illness perceptions of a myocardial infarction emerged: (i) 'sign of a chronic condition - feasible to influence'; (ii) 'sign of a chronic condition - uncontrollable'; (iii) 'acute event that can recur - feasible to influence'; (iv) 'acute event that can recur - uncontrollable'; (v) 'unthinkable acute event'; and (vi) 'non-recurring acute event'. CONCLUSION: The more reflective patients perceived the heart attack as a sign of a chronic condition; they also devoted time for reasoning about the possible causes of their illness. This is in contrast to patients who were less reflective and viewed their myocardial infarction as an acute event, which they avoided thinking about. The findings contribute to our understanding of variation in illness perceptions. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The examination of how individuals perceive myocardial infarction may help health-care professionals individualize secondary preventive strategies, thereby improving adherence to health-care regimens. Nurse-patient discussions could begin with identification of the patient's variations of reflectiveness concerning his/her illness.

  • 3.
    Alsén, Pia
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för omvårdnad, hälsa och kultur.
    Eriksson, Monica
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för omvårdnad, hälsa och kultur, Avd för hälsa och kultur.
    Illness perceptions of fatigue and the association with sense of coherence and stress in patients one year after myocardial infarction.2016Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, nr 3-4, s. 525-533Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. To explore the associations between illness perceptions offatigue, sense of coherence and stress in patients one year after myocardial infarc-tion.Background. Post-myocardial infarction fatigue is a stressful symptom that is dif-ficult to cope with. Patients' illness perceptions of fatigue guide professionals inpredicting how individuals will respond emotionally and cognitively to symptoms.Individuals' sense of coherence can be seen as a coping resource in managingstressors.Design. A cross-sectional study design was used.Method. One year post-myocardial infarction, a total of 74 patients still experi-encing fatigue completed four questionnaires: the Multidimensional Fatigue ScaleInventory -20, the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire, the Sense of Coherencescale (sense of coherence-13) and a single-item measure of stress symptoms.Descriptive statistics, correlations and stepwise regression analysis were carriedout.Results. Strong negative associations were found between illness perceptions offatigue, sense of coherence and stress. Sense of coherence has an impact on illnessperceptions of fatigue. Of the dimensions of sense of coherence, comprehensibilityseemed to play the greatest role in explaining illness perceptions of fatigueone year after myocardial infarction.Conclusion. To strengthen patients' coping resources, health-care professionalsshould create opportunities for patients to gain individual-level knowledge thatallows them to distinguish between common fatigue symptoms and warning signsfor myocardial infarction.Relevance to clinical practice. There is a need to improve strategies for copingwith fatigue. It is also essential to identify patients with fatigue after myocardialinfarction, as they need explanations for their symptoms and extra support

  • 4.
    Arakelian, Erebouni
    et al.
    Uppsala University Hospital,Department of Surgical Sciences, Entrance 70, SE-751 28..
    Swenne, Christine Leo
    Uppsala University, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Box 564, SE-751 22, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Susan
    Skaraborg Hospital, Department of Anaesthesia, SE-541 85, Skövde, Swede.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Avdelningen för omvårdnad - avancerad nivå. Faculty of Professional Studies, University of Nordland, 8049, Bodø, Norway..
    von Vogelsang, Ann-Christin
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience,Stockholm, Sweden..
    The meaning of person-centred care in the perioperative nursing context from the patient's perspective: an integrative review2017Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, nr 17-18, s. 2527-2544Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To determine the meaning of person-centred care from the patient's perspective and in the context of perioperative nursing. BACKGROUND: Person-centred care (PCC) is used but not defined in the perioperative context. The concept indicates an interest in the patient's own experience of health, illness, needs and preferences. As with many terms that are frequently used, there is a tendency for person-centred care to mean different things to different people in different contexts. METHODS: A two-part search strategy was employed; firstly, a computerized database search of PubMed and CINAHL, using Medical Subject Headings and free terms to search articles dating from 2004 to 2014, and secondly, a hand-search of those articles' reference lists was performed. Twenty-three articles were selected and an integrative review was conducted. RESULTS: Four themes were discovered: 'Being recognized as a unique entity and being allowed to be the person you are', 'Being considered important by having one's personal wishes taken into account', 'The presence of a perioperative nurse is calming; prevents feelings of loneliness and promotes wellbeing, which may speed up recovery', and 'Being close to and being touched by the perioperative nurse during surgery'. CONCLUSIONS: PCC means respecting the patient as a unique individual, considering the patient's particularities and wishes, and involving the patient in their own care. PCC also implies having access to one's own nurse who is present both physically and emotionally through the entire perioperative process and who guides the patient and follows up postoperatively, guaranteeing that the patient is not alone. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: By having a common understanding of the concept of PCC, the nurse anaesthetists' and theatre nurses' caring actions or concerns will be directed towards the patient', resulting in personalization of care rather than simply defining the concept. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 5.
    Bay, Annika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine Department of Nursing.
    Lämås, Kristina
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing, .
    Berghammer, Malin
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Avdelningen för omvårdnad - avancerad nivå.
    Sandberg, Camilla
    Umeå University, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Sweden.
    Johansson, Bengt
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    It's like balancing on a slackline: A description of how adults with congenital heart disease describe themselves in relation to physical activity2018Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, nr 15-16, s. 3131-3138Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To illuminate how adults with CHD describe themselves in relation to physical activity.

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have shown that adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) have reduced exercise capacity and do not reach the recommended daily level of physical activity. With this in view, it is of immense importance to investigate how this population experiences physical activity.

    DESIGN: Qualitative study with semi-structured interviews analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were individually performed with fourteen adults (women=7, age 19-68 years) with complex CHD. Patients were purposively recruited from the clinic waiting list, based on a scheduled follow-up and diagnosis.

    RESULTS: The overall theme, It's like balancing on a slackline, illustrates how adults with CHD described themselves in relation to physical activity. This overall theme consisted of four subthemes: (1) Being an adventurer- enjoying the challenges of physical activity; (2) Being a realist- adapting to physical ability; (3) Being a non-doer- lacking prerequisites for physical activity; and (4) Being an outsider- feeling excluded depending on physical ability.

    CONCLUSIONS: Adults with CHD seem to have a diverse relationship to physical activity and it involves various aspects throughout the lifespan. The findings point out factors that might constitute as obstacles for being physically active, specific for people with chronic conditions like CHD. This highlights the importance of further exploring the hindering and facilitating factors for being physically active in order to get a deeper understanding of how to support adults with CHD to be physically active.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Given the diverse relationship to physical activity, nurses have to further investigate the patients' relationship to physical activity, in order to support a healthy lifestyle. Nurses and allied health professionals should offer individualized exercise prescriptions and education about suitable physical activities in relation to physical ability. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 6.
    Boman, Åse
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Avdelningen för omvårdnad - avancerad nivå.
    Learning by supporting others: experienced parents' development process when supporting other parents with a child with Type 1 diabetes2018Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, nr 5-6, s. E1171-E1178Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: This study's purpose was to describe and analyze coach-parents' development process when supporting parents of children recently diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM).

    BACKGROUND: It has been found repeatedly that providing social support for families with a child diagnosed with T1DM promotes health and wellbeing for both the child and the parents. Less explored are the processes experienced by those who provide this support. However, research has found that acting as a provider of social support promotes personal development, strengthens communication skills, and increases self-confidence.

    METHODS: The study design was based on Constructivist Grounded Theory and data were collected, through Repeated Focus Group Discussions, from eight coach-parents at a Swedish hospital from 2012-2015.

    RESULTS: The core category in the data was identified as a learning process where coach-parents emphasized their own learning in the dyad supporter - supported, and in the interaction with other parents in the Repeated Focus Group Discussions. The coach-parents' motivation for participation was a wish to learn more and to help other parents in a life-changing situation. They also pointed out hindrances and their frustration when unable to provide support.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study leads to the conclusion that people who provide support benefit from doing so. Encountering people with similar experiences in a supportive situation promotes a reciprocal learning process, based on the supporter's wish to help people in a situation they recognize. A further conclusion is that social support is not only essential initially, but is also important over a longer period and that it follows various life stages.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Setting up repeated focus group discussions might be a relevant and effective tool for pediatric diabetes nurses to use in promoting health and wellbeing for both families with a newly diagnosed child and experienced families. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 7.
    Bratt, Ewa-Lena
    et al.
    , Department of Paediatric Cardiology, The Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital.
    Östman-Smith, Ingegerd
    The Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Department of Paediatric Cardiology, Gothenburg.
    Axelsson, Åsa
    University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy.
    Berntsson, Leeni
    University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy,.
    Quality of life in asymptomatic children and adolescents before and after diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy through family screening.2013Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 22, nr 1-2, s. 211-221Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives.  The aim of this study was to measure quality of life (QoL) in asymptomatic children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) before and after diagnosis. Background.  Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a disease with a 50% risk of inheritance. Children at risk for serious complications can be diagnosed early with family screening, but before embarking on a screening programme, it is important to evaluate the psychosocial consequences of such screening. Design.  Prospective case-control study. Methods.  Quality of life was measured using a questionnaire by Lindström incorporating both objective and subjective aspects of the three spheres: external, interpersonal and personal, before and two years after diagnosis. The study group consisted of 13 children/adolescents (11 boys), median age 11 (5-18) years, with HCM diagnosed at family screening. All filled out a questionnaire before diagnosis and at follow-up. 41 healthy children/adolescents (22 boys), median age 11 (2-19) years with a first-degree relative diagnosed with HCM served as controls; 15/41 also completed follow-up data. Results.  The total QoL score for all spheres was similar in both groups at baseline and follow-up. In the interpersonal sphere, it was more common that children diagnosed with HCM had no siblings both at baseline (p = 0·002) and follow-up (p = 0·005). The family situation, social support and life events were unchanged from baseline to follow-up. Children with HCM had significantly more psychosomatic symptoms compared with controls at baseline (p < 0·05) but not at follow-up. Self-esteem, peer acceptance and satisfaction with school were unchanged and similar between groups. Conclusion.  Family screening for HCM does not appear to negatively influence QoL. Relevance to clinical practice.  This study indicates that family screening of asymptomatic children and adolescents had no significant detrimental effects on QoL. This suggests that the benefits of finding symptomatic individuals at risk for serious complications outweigh concerns about screening asymptomatic individuals.

  • 8.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för individ och samhälle, Avd för utbildningsvetenskap och språk. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping,Sweden.
    Barimani, Mia
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rosander, Michael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping,Sweden.
    Berlin, Anita
    Karolinska Institute, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Parents' reasons for not attending parental education groups in antenatal and child health care: A qualitative study2019Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 28, nr 17-18, s. 3330-3338Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: To explore expectant and new parents' reasons not to partici ‐pate in parental education (PE) groups in antenatal care or child health care.

    Background: In Sweden, expectant and new parents are offered PE groups in antena‐tal care and in child health care. Although many parents feel unprepared for parent ‐hood, an urgent task is to attract parents to attend the PE groups.

    Design: A total of 915 parents with children aged 0 to 21 months answered a web questionnaire with open questions about (a) reasons not to participate; (b) anything that could change their mind; and (c) parenting support instead of PE groups. This was analysed using content analysis. The study follows the SRQR guidelines.

    Results: Parents expressed private reasons for not attending PE groups. Some par ‐ents also asked for more heterogeneity regarding content and methods, as well as accommodation of parents' different interests. Other parents asked for like‐minded individuals who were in similar situation to themselves. Lack of information or invita ‐tions from antenatal care or child health care, or that PE groups were unavailable, were additional reasons for not participating in groups.

    Conclusions: Reasons for not attending PE groups were multifaceted from personal,self‐interested and norm‐critical reasons, to that the groups were not available or that the parents were not aware of their existence.

    Relevance to clinical practice: Parents of today are a diverse group with different in ‐terests and needs. Nevertheless, all parents need to feel included in a way that makes participation in PE groups relevant for them. Thus, it is important for leaders to be aware of structures and norms, and to be able to create a group climate and a peda ‐gogy of acceptance where group members value each other's differences. However,to attract parents to participate in PE groups, it is necessary for clinical practice to work on individual, group and organisational levels.

  • 9.
    Fredriksson-Larsson, Ulla
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för omvårdnad, hälsa och kultur, Avd för vårdvetenskap på avancerad nivå. Institute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. 3Centre for Person-Centred Care, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Alsén, Pia
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för omvårdnad, hälsa och kultur, Avd för vårdvetenskap på grundnivå. Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Avdelningen för omvårdnad - avancerad nivå.
    Karlson, Björn W
    AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Brink, Eva
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för omvårdnad, hälsa och kultur, Avd för specialistsjuksköterskeutbildning. University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences.
    Fatigue two months after myocardial infarction and its relationships with other concurrent symptoms, sleep quality and coping strategies.2015Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, nr 15-16, s. 2192-2200Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore fatigue levels two months after myocardial infarction and examine the associations with other concurrent symptoms, sleep quality and coping strategies.

    BACKGROUND: Fatigue has been found to be the most frequent and bothersome symptom after myocardial infarction, influencing health-related quality of life negatively.

    DESIGN: The present study was explorative and cross-sectional. The focus was on fatigue two months postmyocardial infarction, complemented with a comparative analysis of fatigue dimension levels.

    METHODS: The sample included 142 persons (mean age 63 years), treated for myocardial infarction, who responded to a questionnaire package measuring fatigue, depression, health complaints (symptoms), sleep quality and coping strategies.

    RESULTS: The main results showed that a global fatigue score two months postmyocardial infarction was associated with concurrent symptoms, such as breathlessness and stress, and coping strategies such as change in values, intrusion and isolation. In comparisons of present fatigue dimension levels (general fatigue, physical fatigue, reduced activity and mental fatigue) two months postmyocardial infarction with baseline measurements (first week in hospital), the results showed that levels of fatigue dimensions had decreased. In comparisons with levels of fatigue four months postmyocardial infarction in a reference group, we found lower levels of fatigue two months postmyocardial infarction.

    CONCLUSION: The present findings indicated that postmyocardial infarction fatigue is lowest two months postmyocardial infarction. This may thus be the right time to identify persons experiencing postmyocardial infarction fatigue, as timely fatigue relief support may prevent progression into a state of higher levels of fatigue.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINIC PRACTICE: Measuring fatigue two months postmyocardial infarction would enable healthcare professionals to identify persons experiencing fatigue and to introduce fatigue relief support. Tailored rehabilitation support should include stress management and breathlessness relief support. If maladaptive use of the coping strategies isolation and intrusion is observed, these strategies could be discussed together with the patient.

  • 10.
    Gao, Han
    et al.
    Jinzhou Medical University, College of Nursing, Jinzhou City, Liaoning Province, China..
    Söderhamn, Ulrika
    University of Agder, Center for Caring Research-Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, Kristiansand, Norway..
    Cliffordson, Christina
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Avdelningen for hälsopromotion och vårdvetenskap.
    Guo, Lina
    Jinzhou Medical University, College of Nursing, Jinzhou City, Liaoning Province, China..
    Guo, Qiyun
    Jinzhou Medical University, College of Nursing, Jinzhou City, Liaoning Province, China..
    Liu, Kun
    Jinzhou Medical University, College of Nursing, Jinzhou City, Liaoning Province, China..
    Reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the Self-care Ability Scale for the Elderly2017Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, nr 23-24, s. 4489-4497Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To translate the Self-care Ability Scale for the Elderly into Simplified Chinese, and to test the Chinese version of the scale regarding its reliability and validity among older people.

    BACKGROUND: Self-care is an important topic in nursing. When assessing older people's self-care ability, it is essential that a reliable and valid instrument is used.

    DESIGN: This study employed across-sectional design.

    METHODS: We translated the English version of the Self-care Ability Scale for the Elderly into Simplified Chinese according to Brislin's translation guidelines, and carried out a questionnaire survey among 610 older people, including both community-dwelling people and hospital patients, in Jinzhou City, People's Republic of China. Eighty participants completed the instrument twice for test-retest reliability. Data analyses were performed using SPSS 17.0 and Mplus, version 5 to assess reliability and validity.

    RESULTS: A Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.89 and statistically significant item-to-total correlations showed evidence of homogeneity. An intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.99 for the test-retest between total scores and intra-class correlation coefficients between 0.87 and 0.99 for the test-retest scores of each item explained the almost perfect test-retest reliability noted in this study. Content validity was found to be good, and a three-factor model was obtained in an exploratory factor analysis, (explaining a variance of 57%), and modified in a confirmatory factor analysis (χ(2) =261.559, df=98, RMSEA=0.074; SRMR=0.059), which reflected an acceptable construct validity.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that the Chinese version of the Self-care Ability Scale for the Elderly has sufficient psychometric properties for assessing self-care ability among older people in China.

    RELEVANCE FOR PRACTICE: A reliable and valid instrument is available to assess the self-care ability of older Chinese people. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 11.
    Hedberg, Berit
    et al.
    University College of Health Sciences, Jönköping, Department of Nursing.
    Johanson, Marita
    Högskolan Väst, Administration.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Communicating stroke survivors' health and further needs for support in care-planning meetings2008Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 17, nr 11, s. 1481-1491Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 12.
    Hedman Ahlström, Britt
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för omvårdnad, hälsa och kultur, Avd för sjuksköterskeutbildning.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Gothenburg University, Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences.
    Danielson, Ella
    Gothenburg University, Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences.
    The meaning of major depression in family life: The viewpoint of the ill parent2010Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, nr 1-2, s. 284-293Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim and objective.  The aim was to elucidate the meaning of major depression in family life from the viewpoint of an ill parent.

    Background.  Major depression according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders is common and may appear repeatedly over several years, and affects family life. Depression in parents has a negative impact on family function and children’s health; however, studies regarding the deeper understanding of major depression in family life are lacking.

    Design.  A qualitative explorative study using narrative interviews with eight parents who were identified with major depression.

    Methods.  A phenomenological-hermeneutic method of interpretation was used for analysing interview texts and included naïve understanding, a structural analysis where text was divided into meaning units, which were condensed and abstracted, and finally a comprehensive understanding.

    Result.  Two themes were extracted: ‘to be afflicted in an almost unmanageable situation’ with sub-themes ‘feeling hopelessly bad’, ‘being worthless’, ‘being unsatisfied’ and the theme ‘to reconcile oneself to the situation’ with sub-themes ‘being active’, ‘being satisfied’ and ‘maintaining parenthood’.

    Conclusion.  Comprehensive understanding revealed the parents’ simultaneous suffering and dignity in family life; suffering with serious lack of well-being and health, destroyed self-confidence and unhappiness, and dignity with strength, confidence and joy in children. The movement between suffering and dignity complicated family life. Dignity was threatened by the awareness that suffering in major depression was recurrent. Dignity had to be repeatedly restored for self and the family, and family dignity has to be restored before others outside the family circle.

    Relevance to clinical practice.  A deeper understanding of the meaning of major depression in family life is helpful and for healthcare professionals to prevent individual and family suffering by assisting and preserving dignity.

  • 13.
    Johansson, Ann-Caroline
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Avdelningen för omvårdnad - avancerad nivå. University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Brink, Eva
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap. University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Cliffordson, Christina
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Avdelningen for hälsopromotion och vårdvetenskap.
    Axelsson, Malin
    Malmö University, Department of Care Science, Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö.
    The function of fatigue and illness perceptions as mediators between self-efficacy and health-related quality of life during the first year after surgery in persons treated for colorectal cancer.2018Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, nr 7-8, s. E1537-E1548Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was twofold: 1) to measure changes in health-related quality of life (HRQoL), two dimensions of illness perceptions (i.e., consequences and emotional representations), fatigue and self-efficacy in persons treated for CRC during the first year after surgical treatment, and 2) to study how fatigue, illness perceptions and self-efficacy measured at 3 months affect HRQoL at 12 months post-surgery.

    BACKGROUND: There are fluctuations in HRQoL during the first year after treatment for colorectal cancer (CRC), and fatigue may negatively influence HRQoL. Illness perceptions (consequences and emotional representations) and self-efficacy have been shown to be associated with HRQoL in other cancer diagnoses. Concerning CRC, there is a lack of knowledge concerning how illness perceptions and self-efficacy change during recovery, and how these variables and fatigue at 3 months relate to HRQoL at 12 months.

    DESIGN: A prospective longitudinal design.

    METHODS: Thirty-nine persons surgically treated for colorectal cancer, of whom 17 had a colostoma, participated. HRQoL, fatigue, illness perceptions and self-efficacy were assessed using QLQ-C30, the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire and the Maintain Function Scale. Descriptive and analytical statistics were used.

    RESULTS: No changes were reported in levels of HRQoL, fatigue, or illness perceptions. Self-efficacy was lower at 12 months compared to 3 months. Fatigue and one dimension of illness perceptions mediated the effect of self-efficacy at 3 months on HRQoL at 12 months.

    CONCLUSION: Persons treated for CRC who have lower self-efficacy 3 months post-surgery are inclined to have more negative illness perceptions concerning emotions and to experience more fatigue.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nurses need to support persons with fatigue and negative illness perceptions concerning emotions and to bolster their self-efficacy, i.e., carry out follow-up consultations focusing on illness management, symptoms, emotions and information on ways to increase self-efficacy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 14.
    Johnsson, Anette
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Avdelningen för omvårdnad - grundnivå. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, Sweden.
    Boman, Åse
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Avdelningen för omvårdnad - avancerad nivå.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, Sweden.
    Pennbrant, Sandra
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Avdelningen för omvårdnad - grundnivå.
    Voices used by nurses when communicating with patients and relatives in a department of medicine for older people: An ethnographic study2018Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, nr 7-8, s. E1640-E1650Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe how nurses communicate with older patients and their relatives in a department of medicine for older people in western Sweden.

    BACKGROUND: Communication is an essential tool for nurses when working with older patients and their relatives but often patients and relatives experience shortcomings in the communication exchanges. They may not receive information or are not treated in a professional way. Good communication can facilitate the development of a positive meeting and improve the patient's health outcome.

    DESIGN: An ethnographic design informed by the sociocultural perspective was applied.

    METHOD: Forty participatory observations were conducted and analyzed during the period October 2015 to September 2016. The observations covered 135 hours of nurse-patient-relative interaction. Field notes were taken and 40 informal field conversations with nurses and 40 with patients and relatives were carried out. Semi-structured follow-up interviews were conducted with five nurses.

    RESULTS: In the result, it was found that nurses communicate with four different voices: a medical voice described as being incomplete, task-oriented and with a disease perspective; a nursing voice described as being confirmatory, process-oriented and with a holistic perspective; a pedagogical voice described as being contextualized, comprehension-oriented and with a learning perspective; and a power voice described as being distancing and excluding. The voices can be seen as context-dependent communication approaches. When nurses switch between the voices this indicates a shift in the orientation or situation.

    CONCLUSION: The results indicate that if nurses successfully combine the voices, while limiting the use of the power voice, the communication exchanges can become a more positive experience for all parties involved and a good nurse-patient-relative communication exchange can be achieved.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Working for improved communication between nurses, patients and relatives is crucial for establishing a positive nurse-patient-relative relationship, which is a basis for improving patient care and healthcare outcomes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 15.
    Johnsson, Anette
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Avdelningen för omvårdnad - grundnivå. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Boman, Åse
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Avdelningen för omvårdnad - avancerad nivå.
    Pennbrant, Sandra
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Avdelningen för omvårdnad - grundnivå.
    What are they talking about? Content of the communication exchanges between nurses, patients and relatives in a department of medicine for older people: An ethnographic study2018Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, nr 7-8, s. E1651-E1659Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore and describe the content of the communication exchanges between nurses, patients and their relatives in a department of medicine for older people in western Sweden.

    BACKGROUND: Information, messages and knowledge are constantly being communicated between nurses, older patients and relatives in the healthcare sector. The quality of communication between them has a major influence on patient outcomes. A prerequisite for good care to be given and received is that there is mutual understanding between the parties involved.

    DESIGN: An ethnographic study was informed by a sociocultural perspective.

    METHOD: Data were collected through 40 participatory observations of meetings between nurses and older patients and/or relatives which covered 135 hours of nurse-patient-relative interaction, field notes, 40 field conversations with 24 nurses and 40 field conversations with patients (n=40) and relatives (n=26). Five semi-structured interviews were conducted with nurses. An ethnographic analysis was performed.

    RESULTS: The analysis identified three categories of content of the communication exchanges: medical content focusing on the patient's medical condition, personal content focusing on the patient's life story, and explanatory content focusing on the patient's health and nursing needs. The content is influenced by the situation and context.

    CONCLUSIONS: Nurses would benefit from more awareness and understanding of the importance of the communication content and of the value of asking the didactic questions (how, when, what and why) in order to improve the patients' and relatives' understanding of the information exchanges and to increase patient safety.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nurses can use the communication content to create conditions enabling them to obtain a holistic view of the patient's life history and to develop an appropriate person-centered care plan. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 16.
    Nunstedt, Håkan
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för omvårdnad, hälsa och kultur.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    University of Gothenburg, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences.
    The portfolio method as management support for patients with major depression2014Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, nr 11-12, s. 1639-1647Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives To describe how patients with major depression in psychiatric outpatient care use the portfolio method and whether the method helps the patients to understand their depression. Background Major depressive disorder is an increasing problem in society. Learning about one’s depression has been demonstrated to be important for recovery. If the goal is better understanding and management of depression, learning must proceed on the patient’s own terms, based on the patient’s previous understanding of their depression. Learning must be aligned with patient needs if it is to result in meaningful and useful understanding. Design Each patient’s portfolio consisted of a binder. Inside the binder, there was a register with predetermined flaps and questions. The patients were asked to work with the questions in the sections that built the content in the portfolio. Methods Individual interviews with patients (n = 5) suffering from major depression according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders – Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) (American Psychiatric Association 1994) were repeatedly conducted between April 2008 and August 2009 in two psychiatric outpatient clinics in western Sweden. Data were analysed using latent content analysis. Results The results showed that the portfolio was used by patients as a management strategy for processing and analysis of their situation and that a portfolio’s structure affects its usability. The patients use the portfolio for reflection on and confirmation of their progress, to create structure in their situation, as a management strategy for remembering situations and providing reminders of upcoming activities. Conclusions Using a clearly structured care portfolio can enable participation and patient learning and help patients understand their depression. Relevance to clinical practice The portfolio method could provide a tool in psychiatric nursing that may facilitate patient understanding and increase self-efficacy.

  • 17.
    Nunstedt, Håkan
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Avdelningen för omvårdnad - grundnivå.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Avdelningen för omvårdnad - avancerad nivå.
    Alsén, Pia
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Avdelningen för omvårdnad - avancerad nivå.
    Pennbrant, Sandra
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Avdelningen för omvårdnad - grundnivå.
    Strategies for healthcare professionals to facilitate patient illness understanding.2017Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, nr 23-24, s. 4696-4706Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To describe how healthcare professionals facilitate patient illness understanding.

    BACKGROUND: Healthcare professionals and patients differ in their illness understanding. If the information provided by healthcare professionals is not adapted to the patient's daily life it may be unusable for the patient. Previous research has found that healthcare professionals should individualise the information to enable the patient to apply the knowledge to the personal situation and to develop illness understanding. However, little is known of how healthcare professionals can facilitate patient illness understanding.

    METHOD: A qualitative descriptive study based on individual, semi-structured, open-ended and face-to-face interviews was conducted with healthcare professionals (n=11) concerning how they facilitate patients illness understanding. Three health centres were involved during the period of March to November 2014. The interviews were analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: The result identified a continuous and collaborative process with three strategies used by healthcare professionals to facilitate the patient's illness understanding: 1) assess the patient's illness understanding, 2) interact with the patient to develop illness understanding, and 3) support the patient's personal development for illness understanding. The steps in the process depend on each other.

    CONCLUSIONS: The results of our analysis indicate that healthcare professionals can use the continuous and collaborative process to enhance the patient's self-care ability and turn his or her knowledge into action for improving illness understanding.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The three continuous and collaborative process strategies involving pedagogical approaches can create conditions for healthcare professionals to obtain a holistic view of the patient's life and to be a key resource for person-centred care. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 18.
    Sahlsten, Monika J M
    et al.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Institute of Health Care Pedagogics.
    Larsson, Inga E
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för omvårdnad, hälsa och kultur, Avd för sjuksköterskeutbildning.
    Lindencrona, Catharina S C
    Department of Health and Welfare, Stockholm.
    Plos, Kaety A E
    Sahlgrenska Academy at Go¨ teborg University, Faculty of Health and Caring Sciences, Institute of Health.
    Patient participation in nursing care: an interpretation by Swedish registered nurses.2005Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 14, nr 1, s. 35-42Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to clarify Registered Nurses' understanding of patient participation in nursing care. Objectives were to investigate ward nurses' interpretation of the elements of patient participation and its implementation. BACKGROUND: One goal of health care is patient participation. Registered Nurses must encourage the participation of their patients in nursing care situations. A right for patients to make their own informed choices is laid down in Swedish laws and national and local directives. The concept of patient participation can be interpreted differently and is thus difficult to implement and evaluate. Current nursing literature provides little clarity of the elements and processes of patient participation and conceptual definitions differ. DESIGN AND METHODS: A qualitative approach was applied and the Grounded Theory method used. Thirty-one Registered Swedish Nurses described the meaning of patient participation and its implementation in nursing care. Seven focus group interviews with nurses providing inpatient somatic care were carried out in five hospitals in west Sweden. RESULTS: Four properties, describing nurses' approaches and procedures, constitute patient participation. The properties are: interpersonal procedure, therapeutic approach, focus on resources, opportunities for influence. These properties were considered crucial for patient participation in a nursing care context. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The results clarify the concept of patient participation from a nursing perspective. A comprehensive description of important factors for patient participation could be made on the basis of nursing experience. This comprehensive description can be used in nursing care practice and its evaluation. The developed categories can be used in nursing care documentation of how patient participation is realized.

  • 19.
    Sahlsten, Monika J.M.
    et al.
    Institute of Nursing, Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University.
    Larsson, Inga E.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för omvårdnad, hälsa och kultur, Avd för sjuksköterskeutbildning.
    Sjöström, Björn
    School of Life Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde.
    Lindencrona, Catharina S.C.
    Department of Health and Welfare, Stockholm.
    Plos, Kaety A. E.
    Institute of Nursing, Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University, Göteborg.
    Patient participation in nursing care: Towards a concept clarification from a nurse perspective2007Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, nr 4, s. 630-637Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 20.
    Samuelson, Sarah
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för omvårdnad, hälsa och kultur.
    Willén, Charlotta
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för omvårdnad, hälsa och kultur.
    Bratt, Ewa-Lena
    University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences,.
    New kid on the block?: Community nurses’ experiences of caring for sick children at home2015Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, nr 17-18, s. 2448-2457Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives To investigate the experiences of Swedish community nurses in caring for sick children at home, as this is a growing population of patients in community care. Background There is international consensus that sick children should receive care in their homes as far as possible. Home health care allows the family to stay together while the child is undergoing treatment and thus reduces strain on the family. However, it can also be demanding for parents to take on increased responsibilities for their sick child. Children as a patient group is a relatively new phenomenon in community home health care in Sweden and represents a small part of the community nurse responsibilities, making it difficult to accumulate experience. Design A qualitative descriptive design. Methods In-depth interviews with twelve nurses in community health care. Qualitative content analysis was used. Results ‘Feeling confident in order to instil confidence’ was key in nurses’ experiences. Two main themes emerged: ‘Building a trusting relationship with the family’ and ‘Feeling confident in the role as caregiver’. Nurses aimed at creating a trusting nursing relationship and working closely with parents. The nurses’ feeling of confidence in their role as caregivers depended on the support they received and the knowledge they had. Conclusion Many community nurses felt unconfident about caring for children at home but experienced it as manageable when peer support and a distinct collaboration with the paediatric clinic/hospital were present. The ongoing shift from hospital to home care urges paediatric clinics/hospitals and community health care to develop formal policies of transmural collaboration to train and support home nurses to deliver adequate care to sick children and their families at home and safeguard good outcomes. Relevance to clinical practice The implication of the study may contribute to efforts being made to extend and improve cooperation between paediatric clinics/hospitals and community health care.

  • 21.
    Söderhamn, Olle
    et al.
    Univ Agder, Fac Hlth & Sport Sci, Arendal.
    Skisland, Anne
    Univ Agder, Fac Hlth & Sport Sci, Kristiansand.
    Herrman, Margaretha
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för omvårdnad, hälsa och kultur, Avd för hälsa och kultur.
    Attitudes towards the anticipated transition into retirement in the Nordic welfare context2010Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, nr Suppl 1, s. 129-129Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction:There may be different attitudes towards the transition into retirement and old age pensioner life among people who are relatively close to get into their third age. This phenomenon has not been widely studied in the nursing literature. Since this predictable-involuntary transition may have influences on personal health and well-being, it should be meaningful to study it in a self-care perspective. The aim of this study was to illuminate aspects of self-care in a group of middle-aged individuals in relation to their anticipated transition into retirement in the Nordic welfare context. Methods and Materials:A qualitative design was used in this  study. A total number of 13 individuals, 55–65 years of age, were randomly chosen from the total number of inhabitants in three municipalities in mid-west Sweden. The interviews were tape recorded and transcribed verbatim. After content analyses and interpretation, a comprehensive understanding of the phenomenon was revealed. Results: All informants viewed their lives in retrospective with  positive feelings with respect to their childhood and youth. As grown up individuals, they saw family, friends and social relations as very important. No particular differences between the informants from the different municipalities were found, nor in relation to age, sex or profession. There were opportunities, expectations, wishes, concerns and worries related to the transition into old age pensioner life among the informants from both the rural and urban municipalities. Conclusion: Autonomy and mature dependence seem to be positive driving forces for reaching a successful transition into old age. Supporting autonomy should, therefore, be a way for facilitating the predictable-involuntary transition into retirement. Further studies about the retirement transition within a self-care perspective are needed. This study indicates that motivation, autonomy and mature dependence are important issues that should be focused in such research. Gender issues and connectedness are other important areas.

  • 22.
    Wikström, Ann-Charlott
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för omvårdnad, hälsa och kultur, Avd för specialistsjuksköterskeutbildning. Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Avdelningen för omvårdnad - avancerad nivå.
    Larsson, Ullabeth Sätterlund
    Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Institute of Health Care Pedagogics.
    Technology -an actor in the ICU: a study in workplace research tradition.2004Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 13, nr 5, s. 555-61Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The present study focuses on human-machine interaction in an intensive care unit in the West of Sweden. AIMS: The aim of the present study was to explore how technology intervenes and challenges the ICU staff's knowing in practice. THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVE: The study's theoretical starting point draws on workplace research tradition. Workplace studies encompass the interaction between the actors' situated activities and the technological tools that make their activities possible. METHOD: Fieldwork or in situ studies of everyday practice in an intensive care unit documented in written field notes constituted the data. RESULTS: The findings show first how technology intervenes in the division of labour when the taken-for-granted "old" everyday practice is disrupted when a new machine intervenes in the morning's work; secondly, it reveal how technology challenges practical knowing and thirdly, it shows how technology reformulates practice. Staff members' awareness of routine problems is often connected to the ability to see, which is always related to cultural/contextual competence. CONCLUSION: It is concluded that it is not talk alone that helps the caregivers to "(dis)solve" the problems. The ability to see the problems, the work environment and to find the relevant supporting tools for "(dis)solving" the routine problems is also crucial. But it is not possible to say that it is the skillful work of humans that solve problems, nor do we claim it is the tools that do so. Humans and tools are interwoven in the problem-solving process. Relevance to clinical practice. Routine problems in the intensive care unit are not "(dis)solved" through the cognitive work of individual staff members alone. Problems are also "(dis)solved" jointly with other staff members. Staff members "borrow" the knowing from each other and problems are re-represented through communication. The knowing has to be distributed among the intensive care unit staff to make the everyday work flexible.

  • 23.
    Økland Lier, Haldis
    et al.
    Haugesund Hospital, Section of Mental Health Research, Helse Fonna HF, Haugesund, Norway.
    Åström, Sture
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för omvårdnad, hälsa och kultur, Avd för vårdvetenskap på avancerad nivå.
    Rørtveit, Kristine
    Stavanger University Hospital, Psychiatric Nursing, Stavanger District Psychiatric Centre, Stavanger, Norway.
    Patients’ daily life experiences five years after gastric bypass surgery – a qualitative study2016Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, nr 3-4, s. 322-331Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim and objective The objective was to explore and describe patients’ daily life experiences five years after gastric bypass surgery. Background Bariatric surgery markedly decreases body weight. Previous studies describe positive consequences, as well as physical, social and emotional challenges during the first few years after surgery. An understanding of how patients adjust to and cope with postsurgical changes in the long term is crucial to help them obtain a successful outcome after bariatric surgery. Method A qualitative method was employed. In-depth interviews with 10 men and women were conducted five years after bariatric surgery in a Norwegian hospital. Results One overarching theme – a multitude of daily life changes following bariatric surgery – was developed based on three main themes: relational aspects related to weight loss, the new body and changes in self-esteem. Six sub-themes are described. Conclusion Those who undergo gastric bypass surgery experience enormous changes in their daily lives. Their social lives, their relationship to their body and their self-esteem may be altered by the weight loss. Relevance to clinical practice The results of this study suggest directions for patient education, health staff education and peer education. A patient education programme focusing on changes in daily life experiences when undergoing gastric bypass surgery is suggested due to the changes experienced by the patients involved in this study.

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