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  • 1.
    Alsén, Pia
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing.
    Brink, Eva
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Advanced Nursing.
    Living with incomprehensible fatigue after recent myocardial infarction2008In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 64, no 5, p. 459-468Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Berggren, Ingela
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing.
    Severinsson, Elisabeth
    Hedmark University College, Faculty of Health Studies.
    Nurse supervisors' actions in relation to their decision-making style and ethical approach to clinical supervision.2003In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 615-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of the study was to explore the decision-making style and ethical approach of nurse supervisors by focusing on their priorities and interventions in the supervision process. BACKGROUND: Clinical supervision promotes ethical awareness and behaviour in the nursing profession. METHODS: A focus group comprised of four clinical nurse supervisors with considerable experience was studied using qualitative hermeneutic content analysis. FINDINGS: The essence of the nurse supervisors' decision-making style is deliberations and priorities. The nurse supervisors' willingness, preparedness, knowledge and awareness constitute and form their way of creating a relationship. The nurse supervisors' ethical approach focused on patient situations and ethical principles. The core components of nursing supervision interventions, as demonstrated in supervision sessions, are: guilt, reconciliation, integrity, responsibility, conscience and challenge. The nurse supervisors' interventions involved sharing knowledge and values with the supervisees and recognizing them as nurses and human beings. CONCLUSION: Nurse supervisors frequently reflected upon the ethical principle of autonomy and the concept and substance of integrity. The nurse supervisors used an ethical approach that focused on caring situations in order to enhance the provision of patient care. They acted as role models, shared nursing knowledge and ethical codes, and focused on patient related situations. This type of decision-making can strengthen the supervisees' professional identity. The clinical nurse supervisors in the study were experienced and used evaluation decisions as their form of clinical decision-making activity. The findings underline the need for further research and greater knowledge in order to improve the understanding of the ethical approach to supervision.

  • 3.
    Brink, Eva
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Advanced Nursing.
    Brändström, Yvonne
    Department of Medicine, Uddevalla Hospital, Sweden.
    Cliffordson, Christina
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Advanced Nursing.
    Herlitz, Johan
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine.
    Karlson, Björn W.
    AstraZeneca R&D, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Illness consequences after myocardial infarction: Problems with physical functioning and return to work2008In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 64, no 6, p. 587-594Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Brink, Eva
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Advanced Nursing.
    Karlson, Björn W
    Medicine and Science, AstraZeneca R&D, Mölndal.
    Hallberg, Lillemor R-M
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences.
    Readjustment 5 months after a first-time myocardial infarction: reorienting the active self.2006In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 403-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This paper reports on an interview study exploring the self-regulation process in women and men, 5 months after a first-time myocardial infarction. BACKGROUND: Somatic, psychological and social factors affect readjustment after a first-time myocardial infarction, and studies have demonstrated substantial rates of depression in patients after myocardial infarction Women report poorer mental health and physical condition than do men. Reconstruction of the self begins when disease poses novel problems and is more likely to occur in cases of long-lasting and disruptive illnesses. Experiencing myocardial infarction is likely to alter a person's mental representation of self. However, the self-regulation process following first-time myocardial infarction is not yet fully understood. METHOD: Twenty-one people (11 women, 10 men) were interviewed 5 months after first-time myocardial infarction. The grounded theory method provided the strategies for data collection and analysis. FINDINGS: Interviewees' definition of themselves as active was threatened by fatigue and other health problems that kept them from taking part in activities as they had done before the heart attack. Although reorienting the active self was central to the process of recovery from myocardial infarction, reorienting was restricted by illness perception and coping. CONCLUSION: Participants had not established a stable health condition 5 months after first-time myocardial infarction. They mainly preferred to moderate rather than radically change their daily life activities. They needed more knowledge and support. Nurses can help with information and advice on managing daily life activities, including dialogue about lifestyle changes at this phase of readjustment.

  • 5.
    Eriksson, Monica
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Kerekes, Nora
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Brink, Peter
    NU Hospital Group, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Pennbrant, Sandra
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Nunstedt, Håkan
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    The level of sense of coherence among Swedish nursing staff2019In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To explore the level of sense of coherence among Swedish nursing staff.

    Design: An explorative quantitative study design was adopted using a short form for measuring sense of coherence.

    Methods Data were collected in January 2018 from nurses working in full‐time positions at two hospitals in Western Sweden. A total of 93 nurses completed the 13 item questionnaire measuring sense of coherence. Descriptive statistics were applied to obtain means and standard deviations. Spearman's rank correlation was used to describe strength of association between sense of coherence and socio‐demographic categories. Between‐group differences were defined using the nonparametric tests of Mann Whitney U test and Kruskal‐Wallis test.

    Results The internal consistency of the SOC‐13 was low. An inter‐item‐correlation test indicated that two items decreased the internal consistency of the scale. The level of the three dimensions of sense of coherence varied; manageability was weakest and decreased the total sense of coherence. The meaningfulness dimension was as strongest.

    Conclusion On a national level, nurses reported weaker SOC than the general population, but stronger in an international comparison of nurses. They found their work difficult to manage, but meaningful.

    Impact On a national level, the nurses report weaker SOC than the general population, but stronger in an international comparison of nurses. Findings from this study will have an impact on how nurses can manage work related stress in terms of sense of coherence. There will also be an impact on nurses' well‐being, which in a long run benefits patients.

  • 6.
    Fex, Angelika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing.
    Flensner, Gullvi
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Advanced Nursing.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderhamn, Olle
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Advanced Nursing.
    Self-care agency and perceived health among people using advanced medical technology at home2012In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 68, no 4, p. 806-815Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim.

    This article reports a study of self-care agency and perceived health in a group

    of people using advanced medical technology at home.

     

    Background.

    An increasing number of people are using medical technology for selfcare.

    Few studies describe daily life in this context at an overriding level, irrespective

    of the specific sort of technology. A connection between self-care, perceived health

    and sense of coherence has previously been implied.

     

    Methods.

    A descriptive, comparative, cross-sectional quantitative design was used.

    Data were collected from a questionnaire during the winter of 2009/2010. The

    questionnaire addressed perceived health and daily life with medical technology.

    Swedish versions of the Appraisal of Self-care Agency scale and the 13-item version

    of Antonovsky’s sense of coherence scale were included.

     

    Results.

    The questionnaire was answered by 180 adults performing self-care at

    home involving long-term oxygen, a ventilator, or peritoneal- or haemo-dialysis.

    Health-related and technology-related variables in daily life were mostly highly

    satisfactory. Perceived health was rated significantly lower among participants using

    long-term oxygen. Sufficient sense of coherence, knowledge of how to use technology,

    close contact with others and not feeling helpless contributed positively to

    self-care agency. Positive contributing factors for perceived health were being satisfied

    with life, having an active life and not feeling helpless, whereas age was a

    negative factor.

     

    Conclusion.

    Daily life is manageable for people in this context. Long-term oxygen

    treatment and advanced age can be regarded as risk factors for perceiving ill health.

  • 7.
    Finnström, Berit
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing.
    Söderhamn, Olle
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing.
    Conceptions of pain among Somali women living in Sweden.2006In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 418-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This paper reports a study of a group of Somali mothers' views on pain, the causes of pain, pain behaviour and pain treatment concerning themselves and their family members. BACKGROUND: Both the meaning of pain and pain behaviour are associated with values in a patient's social and cultural context. Culture also provides models for how to treat and relieve pain. Several studies report a lack of cultural sensitivity and competence among healthcare professionals, resulting in lower quality of and less access to health care and pain treatment for minority groups. However, the majority of the scientific literature on pain and culture concerns adults in the United States of America. METHOD: Focused conversational interviews were carried out with a convenience sample of nine Somalia women living in Sweden in order to describe and explore their conceptions of pain. Qualitative content analysis was conducted through meaning condensation. The data were collected in 2002-2003. FINDINGS: The women expressed a number of different ideas about definitions and causes of pain. Somalis, especially men, are expected to be stoic about pain. The women had different strategies for communicating about and relieving pain. Children from the ages of 6-8 years upwards were expected to control their pain expression. Respondents used both formal and informal care to relieve pain. For some of the women, consulting a psychologist was not a culturally acceptable way of seeking pain relief. CONCLUSIONS: Nurses must strive for increased cultural competence and explore ways to make healthcare services sensitive to culturally diverse groups. Nurses have an educational role in educating parents and children about pain and the importance of sufficient pain relief. All healthcare providers should be aware of their own cultural values and the risk of stereotyping people.

  • 8.
    Flensner, Gullvi
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Advanced Nursing.
    Lindencrona, Catharina
    The cooling-suit: a study of ten multiple sclerosis patients’ experiences in daily life1999In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 1444-1453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cooling-suit: a study of ten multiple sclerosis patients’ experiences in daily life Approximately 60%–80% of all multiple sclerosis (MS) patients are heat sensitive. The aim of this study was to gain information on the effects of an assistive device, the cooling-suit, on MS-patients’ self-care ability and also practical implications. A single-case approach was adopted in a quasi- experimental before-and-after study. The cooling-suit was used in their own homes by 10 individuals with diagnosed MS in different stages from relapsing–remitting to chronic progressive. Data collection procedures were self-assessment through a structured assessment-instrument, an open-ended interview before and after the intervention and a diary written during one week. The selected instrument, the MS Self-Care ADL Scale, has been developed for persons with MS and was translated into Swedish. The results showed increased self-care ability during and after use of the cooling-suit. However, different aspects of daily life activities were improved and to a varying extent. It is concluded that the study participants were supported and empowered in different activities of daily life such as walking and transfer and reduced voiding problems by using the cooling-suit. Some difficulties in handling the cooling-suit were also reported. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

  • 9.
    Flensner, Gullvi
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Advanced Nursing.
    Lindencrona, Catharina
    The National Board of Health and Welfare, Stockholm.
    The cooling-suit: case studies of its influence on fatigue among eight individuals with multiple sclerosis.2002In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 541-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM OF THE STUDY: To study if the use of a cooling-suit by individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) influenced their experience of fatigue and consequent restrictions in daily life. BACKGROUND: The majority of MS patients consider fatigue as one of their most disabling symptoms and as having a significant impact on their daily lives. Fatigue often increases in a warm environment. A cooling-suit has been reported as a practical method of cooling, but the effect on fatigue has not yet been studied. RESEARCH METHODS: Eight individuals used a cooling-suit in their own homes during a test-period. In a single case-control design, their experience of fatigue was studied before and after. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used: self-assessments using the Fatigue Impact Scale (FIS), open-ended interviews and semi-structured diaries. RESULTS: All study participants reported a reduction in fatigue during the test period. On the FIS, they scored reductions in the physical, cognitive and psycho-social dimensions of daily life. They experienced fatigue less often and for shorter periods. In their diaries and interviews they described decreased muscular strain, less sense of fatigue in relation to intake of food and positive effects on cognitive, social or affective problems related to fatigue. DISCUSSION: The cooling-suit is a practical method for cooling. It gives freedom and flexibility and can be used regardless of setting. Nurses who meet heat-sensitive individuals with MS have the opportunity to give information on cooling methods, including how to use a cooling-suit. In this pilot study we found that individuals with MS who suffered from fatigue reported a number of improvements in quality of daily life. CONCLUSIONS: The result indicates that use of a cooling-suit by individuals with MS may decrease their sense of fatigue. In this sample positive outcomes on daily life situations were reported. Further studies are needed to support these results.

  • 10.
    Koslander, Tiburtius
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences.
    How the spiritual dimension is addressed in psychiatric patient-nurse relationships2005In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 51, no 6, p. 558-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This paper reports a study describing nurses' conceptions of how the spiritual dimension is addressed in psychiatric patient-nurse relationships. BACKGROUND: In psychiatric care, it is essential that patient-nurse relationships be built on a holistic view. In this context, nursing research shows that there is a lack of integration of the spiritual dimension. METHOD: Twelve strategically selected psychiatric nurses were interviewed and analysed using a phenomenographic approach. The data were collected in 2003. FINDINGS: The main findings were three descriptive categories: being a good carer, recognizing the spiritual dimension, and regarding the spiritual dimension as difficult to capture in patient-nurse relationships. The first descriptive category shows that nurses deal with spirituality by behaving as good carers. Those included in the second descriptive category reveal nurses who are aware of patients' spiritual needs and who deal with these needs in different ways. The third descriptive category consists of conceptions revealing lack of knowledge of patients' spiritual needs, both in abstract and real terms. CONCLUSIONS: Further research is needed to explore how patients describe their own spiritual needs, and how nursing staff can learn to be aware of and understand their own spirituality, thus enabling them to detect, discuss, clarify and deal with the concept of spirituality in patient-nurse relationships.

  • 11.
    Koslander, Tiburtius
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University.
    Patients' conceptions of how the spiritual dimension is addressed in mental health care: a qualitative study.2007In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 57, no 6, p. 597-604Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This paper reports a study to describe patients' conceptions of how the spiritual dimension is addressed in mental health care. BACKGROUND: Spirituality is a broad concept, and is highly subjective, multidimensional and difficult to define. Spirituality and religiousness are two separate concepts but have several common features. In mental health care, it is essential that nursing care be built on a holistic view, and the spiritual dimension has an important function in nursing care. The notion of spirituality is full of nuances, and in a multi-cultural society patients express their spirituality in different ways. METHOD: Data were collected by interviewing 12 strategically selected patients in mental health care and analysed according to a qualitative method inspired by the phenomenographic approach. The data were collected in 2003 in Sweden. FINDINGS: Three descriptive categories emerged: patients wish to have their spiritual needs addressed; patients must see to it that their spiritual needs are addressed; patients lack confidence in nurses with regard to discussing spirituality. The findings show that patients actively sought the assistance of nurses to meet their spiritual needs. They turned their thoughts inwards and found community with other patients, while nurses often avoided addressing the spiritual dimension. CONCLUSION: Nurses should work actively to seek new knowledge about how they can address patients' spiritual needs. It is also important that there be scope for discussing and reflecting on spiritual questions at the workplace. Additional research is needed to explore how knowledge about spirituality should be implemented in mental health care and nursing education.

  • 12.
    Mjøsund, Nina Helen
    et al.
    Vestre Viken Hospital Trust,Department of Mental Health Research and Development,, Drammen, Norway.
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Health Sciences.
    Espnes, Geir Arild
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Center for Health Promotion Research, Trondheim, Norway..
    Haaland-Øverby, Mette
    Vestre Viken Hospital Trust,Department of Mental Health Research and Development,, Drammen, Norway.
    Jensen, Sven Liang
    Vestre Viken Hospital Trust,Department of Mental Health Research and Development,, Drammen, Norway.
    Norheim, Irene
    Vestre Viken Hospital Trust,Department of Mental Health Research and Development,, Drammen, Norway.
    Kjus, Solveig
    Vestre Viken Hospital Trust,Department of Mental Health Research and Development,, Drammen, Norway.
    Portaasen, Inger-Lill
    Vestre Viken Hospital Trust,Department of Mental Health Research and Development,, Drammen, Norway.
    Forbech Vinje, Hege
    University College of Southeast Norway, Department of Health Promotion, Faculty of Health Sciences, Kongsberg, Norway..
    Service user involvement enhanced the research quality in a study using interpretative phenomenological analysis: the power of multiple perspectives2017In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 73, no 1, p. 265-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:The aim of this study was to examine how service user involvement can contribute to the development of interpretative phenomenological analysis methodology and enhance research quality.BACKGROUND:Interpretative phenomenological analysis is a qualitative methodology used in nursing research internationally to understand human experiences that are essential to the participants. Service user involvement is requested in nursing research.

    DESIGN:We share experiences from 4 years of collaboration (2012-2015) on a mental health promotion project, which involved an advisory team.

    METHODS:Five research advisors either with a diagnosis or related to a person with severe mental illness constituted the team. They collaborated with the research fellow throughout the entire research process and have co-authored this article. We examined the joint process of analysing the empirical data from interviews. Our analytical discussions were audiotaped, transcribed and subsequently interpreted following the guidelines for good qualitative analysis in interpretative phenomenological analysis studies.

    RESULTS:The advisory team became 'the researcher's helping hand'. Multiple perspectives influenced the qualitative analysis, which gave more insightful interpretations of nuances, complexity, richness or ambiguity in the interviewed participants' accounts. The outcome of the service user involvement was increased breadth and depth in findings.

    CONCLUSION:Service user involvement improved the research quality in a nursing research project on mental health promotion. The interpretative element of interpretative phenomenological analysis was enhanced by the emergence of multiple perspectives in the qualitative analysis of the empirical data. We argue that service user involvement and interpretative phenomenological analysis methodology can mutually reinforce each other and strengthen qualitative methodology.

  • 13.
    Mjøsund, Nina Helen
    et al.
    Department of Mental Health Research and Development, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Drammen, Norway.
    Vinje Forbech, Hege
    University of South-Eastern Norway, Department of Health, Social and WelfareStudies, Faculty of Health and SocialSciences, Norway, Kongsberg, Norway.
    Eriksson, Monica
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Haaland-Øverby, Mete
    Department of Mental Health Research and Development, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Drammen, Norway.
    Jensen, Sven Liang
    Department of Mental Health Research and Development, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Drammen, Norway.
    Kjus, Solveig
    Department of Mental Health Research and Development, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Drammen, Norway.
    Norheim, Irene
    Department of Mental Health Research and Development, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Drammen, Norway.
    Portaasen, Inga-Lill
    Department of Mental Health Research and Development, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Drammen, Norway.
    Espnes, Geir Arild
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU Center for Health PromotionResearch, Trondheim, Norway.
    Salutogenic service user involvement in nursing research: A case study2018In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 74, p. 2145-2156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim The aim was to explore the process of involving mental healthcare service users in a mental health promotion research project as research advisors and to articulate features of the collaboration which encouraged and empowered the advisors to make significant contributions to the research process and outcome.Background There is an increasing interest in evaluating aspects of service user involvement in nursing research. Few descriptions exist of features that enable meaningful service user involvement. We draw on experiences from conducting research which used the methodology interpretative phenomenological analysis to explore how persons with mental disorders perceived mental health. Apart from the participants in the project, five research advisors with service user experience were involved in the entire research process.Design We applied a case study design to explore the ongoing processes of service user involvement. Methods Documents and texts produced while conducting the project (2012-2016), as well as transcripts from multistage focus group discussions with the research advisors, were analysed.Results The level of involvement was dynamic and varied throughout the different stages of the research process. Six features: leadership, meeting structure, role clarification, being members of a team, a focus on possibilities and being seen and treated as holistic individuals, were guiding principles for a salutogenic service user involvement. These features strengthened the advisors' perception of themselves as valuable and competent contributors. Conclusion Significant contributions from research advisors were promoted by facilitating the process of involvement. A supporting structure and atmosphere were consistent with a salutogenic service user involvement.

  • 14.
    Rönnerhag, Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level. University of South-Eastern Norway, Centre for Women's, Family and Child Health, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, P.O. Box 235, N-3603, Kongsberg, Norway.
    Severinsson, Elisabeth
    University of South-Eastern Norway, Centre for Women's, Family and Child Health, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, P.O. Box 235, N-3603, Kongsberg, Norway.
    Haruna, Megumi
    Department of Midwifery and Women's Health, Division of Health Sciences& Nursing Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033, Japan.
    Berggren, Ingela
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    A qualitative evaluation of healthcare professionals' perceptions of adverse events focusing on communication and teamwork in maternity care2019In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 75, no 3, p. 585-593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of this study was to explore healthcare professionals' perceptions of adverse events during childbirth with focus on communication and teamwork.

    BACKGROUND: Inadequate communication, a poor teamwork climate and insufficient team training are harmful to women. Reviews of reported adverse events can be used to develop a safety culture based on preparedness for preventing adverse events and strengthening patient safety.

    DESIGN: Action research principles were used to facilitate the implementation and evaluation of this study.

    METHODS: An interprofessional team of healthcare professionals comprising obstetricians, registered midwives and assistant nurses employed at a labour ward agreed to take part. Data were collected from multistage focus group interviews (March 2016 - June 2016) and analysed by means of interpretative thematic analysis.

    FINDINGS: Two analytical themes based on five sub-themes emerged; Promoting interprofessional teamwork and Building capabilities by involving healthcare professionals and elucidating relevant strategies. The findings reveal the importance of facilitating relationships based on trust and respectful communication to ensure a safe environment and provide safe maternity care.

    CONCLUSION: There is a need for formal and informal support for quality interprofessional teamwork. Research on patient safety may reduce adverse events related to miscommunication and poor teamwork. We recommend different forms of communication and teamwork training in interprofessional teams to increase the ability to provide feedback. Accumulated research is required for the evaluation of evidence-based models in the patient safety context. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 15.
    Söderhamn, Ulrika
    et al.
    Norra Älvsborgs Länssjukhus, Department of Geriatrics and Rehabilitation.
    Söderhamn, Olle
    University West, Department of Nursing.
    Reliability and validity of the nutritional form for the elderly (NUFFE)2002In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 28-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of this study was to test the reliability and validity of the Nutritional Form for the Elderly (NUFFE). BACKGROUND: The prevalence of undernutrition among older people in nursing homes and hospitals reaches high levels. Assessment of older patients' nutritional status is an important task for nurses in clinical care. To use a simple nutritional assessment instrument for older people is one approach for nurses. Examples of such instruments are the well validated Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) and the newly developed NUFFE. METHODS: A total of 114 consecutively chosen, newly admitted older patients in an elder care rehabilitation ward in western Sweden were interviewed using the NUFFE and MNA. Arm and calf circumferences, body mass index (BMI), and presence of pressure sores and skin ulcers were noted as part of the MNA on admission. Weight was monitored and BMI calculated on discharge. Serum albumin levels on admission and discharge were used if these were available in the records. Reliability of the NUFFE was measured as homogeneity. Criterion related validity, concurrent validity, construct validity, and predictive validity were assessed with different statistical methods. The regional research ethics committee approved the study. RESULTS: The results showed that the NUFFE is a fairly reliable and valid instrument for identifying actual and potential undernutrition among older patients. CONCLUSION: The NUFFE is a simple tool for nurses to use to assess older patients with the aim of detecting undernourished individuals and those at risk for undernutrition. When doing a nutritional assessment with the NUFFE, the BMI ought also to be calculated. The assessment could also be combined with food intake recording for a period of time.

  • 16.
    Wikström, Ann-Charlott
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing. University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Sätterlund Larsson, Ullabeth
    Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Institute of Health Care Pedagogics.
    Patient on display: a study of everyday practice in intensive care2003In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 376-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: This study investigates the situated organization in a workplace producing intensive care, that is an intensive care unit (ICU). The workplace research tradition concerns work and interaction/communication in technology-intensive environments. Communication is seen as social action and cannot be separated from production or from the context in which the activities are situated. AIM: The aim of the present study was to explore how intensive care is produced by analysing a recurrent situated activity in the ICU, namely the delivery and reception of a patient coming from the operation unit. METHOD: In the fieldwork, participant observations was used to study everyday practice in an ICU, combined with written field notes. FINDINGS AND DISCUSSION: Intensive care is to a great extent produced through routine practices. The division of labour is marked and is taken for granted: everyone knows what to do. The actors' physical location in the room is connected to their functions and work with supportive tools. Verbal reports, visual displays and activities make the information transmission available to everyone in the patient room. Shared understanding of the situation seems to make words redundant when the activities of competent actors are co-ordinated. There is also coordination between the actors in the ICU and the technological equipment, which constantly produces new information that must be interpreted. Enrolled Nurses are physically closest to the patients, the physician is the one most physically distant from patients and Registered Nurses bridge the gap between them. These actors produce and re-produce intensive care through constant sense-making in the here and now at the same time as the past is present in their activities.

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