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  • 1.
    Jenholt Nolbris, Margaretha
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy.
    Ahlström, Britt Hedman
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing.
    Siblings of children with cancer - Their experiences of participating in a person-centered support intervention combining education, learning and reflection: Pre- and post-intervention interviews.2014In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 254-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To evaluate a person-centered intervention, directed to siblings with a brother or sister newly diagnosed with cancer that combines education, learning and reflection about cancer.

    METHOD: Qualitative methods with pre- and post-intervention semi-structured interviews were conducted. Fourteen siblings aged 9-22 years participated. A qualitative content analysis was carried out.

    RESULTS: The result comprises of five themes: 'grasping for knowledge about cancer, 'thinking for hours and having nightmares', 'experiencing physical pain', 'being emotional in several ways', 'waiting for a normal, good life despite the uncertain future". Pre-intervention; a low level of knowledge of cancer treatments and its side effects was revealed; siblings slept poorly, lay awake thinking and had nightmares about cancer; they felt pain in different parts of their body; they felt emotional and angry and were anxious as cancer is life-threatening; in the future the sick child will finished treatment and recovered. Post-intervention; siblings described having specific knowledge, felt more informed, and that it was easier to understand the sick child's situation; they slept better, but still had a lot on their minds regarding the sick child; most siblings said they no longer experienced pain, felt better and were happier but could still get sad; in the future the sick child would be healthy, not exactly as before, but almost.

    CONCLUSION: Person-centered intervention helps siblings to be more knowledgeable about the sick child's cancer, leading to a more realistic view about treatments and consequences. Further studies of person-centered interventions for siblings are important.

  • 2.
    Karlsson, Elisabet
    et al.
    NU-Hospital Organisation, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    Andersson, Kristina
    NU-Hospital Organisation,Department of Pediatrics.
    Ahlström, Britt Hedman
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing.
    Loneliness despite the presence of others: Adolescents’ experiences of having a parent who becomes ill with cancer2013In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 697-703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AbstractAim The aim of this study was to describe young adults’ own perspectives on the experience of having a parent who developed cancer when the young adult was an adolescent. Method Narrative interviews were conducted with six young adults aged between 20 and 26. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results The main message that the young adults communicated in the interviews was interpreted as the overarching theme ‘Loneliness despite the presence of others’. Two domains with three categories each emerged: distance, comprising a feeling of loneliness, lacking the tools to understand, and grief and anger; and closeness, comprising belief in the future, comfort and relief, and a need for support. The young adults felt a loneliness that they had never experienced before, and they lacked the tools to understand the situation. They felt grief and anger over what the cancer had caused. However, they had still managed to regain faith in the future. They found comfort and relief in the thought that this would not necessarily happen to them again, and they gained support from talking to family and friends. Conclusion If all family members are given the same information, it becomes easier to talk about what is happening. This can reduce adolescent children’s experience of loneliness. Contact with health care professionals should be maintained throughout the period of illness. Many short informal contacts create relationships and trust that can be helpful if the worst happens and the parent dies.

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