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  • 1.
    Ali, L.
    et al.
    Gothenburg University, Psychiatric and Mental Health care, The Institute of Health and Care Science, Sahlgrenska Academy.
    Ahlström, Britt Hedman
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för omvårdnad, hälsa och kultur, Avd för sjuksköterskeutbildning.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital,Department of Psychiatry.
    Daily life for young adults who care for a person with mental illness: A qualitative study2012Inngår i: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 19, nr 7, s. 610-617Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study describes the daily life and management strategies of young informal carers of family members or friends with mental illness. Twelve young adults (three men and nine women; 16-25 years old) in Sweden were voluntarily recruited between February and May 2008. Data collected through eight individual semi-structured interviews and one focus group interview were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The findings revealed nine subthemes that were further grouped into three main themes: showing concern, providing support and using management strategies. Participants lived in constant readiness for something unexpected to happen to the person they cared for, and their role in the relationship could change quickly from family member or friend to guardian or supervisor. Supporting a friend was considered as large a personal responsibility as supporting a family member. Their management strategies were based on individual capacities and their ability to step aside should the situation become too demanding. These young informal carers need support in caring for the mentally ill. As the internet becomes increasingly fundamental to daily life, support could be provided most effectively through person-centred web sites. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing.

  • 2.
    Antonsson, H
    et al.
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing.
    Åström, Sture
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för omvårdnad, hälsa och kultur, Avd för vårdvetenskap på avancerad nivå.
    Lundström, M
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing.
    Graneheim, U H
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing.
    Skilled interaction among professional carers in special accommodations for adult people with learning disabilities.2013Inngår i: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 20, nr 7, s. 576-583Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Communicative difficulties affect interactions between people with learning disabilities and their carers. Despite such difficulties, however, some carers seem to interact successfully with people who have limited ability to communicate verbally and exhibit challenging behaviour. This study aims to illuminate skilled interaction among carers working in special accommodations for people with learning disabilities. Interactions between 16 caregivers and 11 residents with learning disabilities were recorded on video. Verbal and non-verbal interaction skills among the carers were identified. Four caring situations with people with learning disabilities were chosen to illuminate skilled interaction. The transcribed text was subjected to qualitative content analysis and core stories were created. The results show that skilled interaction between the carers and the people with learning disabilities is based upon being confirming, sharing daily life experience, giving time and space, and using congruent and distinct language. In this paper we present examples that offer concrete suggestions of how to promote successful interaction and create meaning in the shared day-to-day life in special accommodations for people with learning disabilities.

  • 3.
    Gustafsson, Erika
    et al.
    NU Hospital Group, Department of Institutional Forensic Psychiatric Care, Vänersborg.
    Holm, Maritha
    NU Hospital Group, Department of Institutional Forensic Psychiatric Care, Vänersborg.
    Flensner, Gullvi
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för omvårdnad, hälsa och kultur, Avd för specialistsjuksköterskeutbildning.
    Rehabilitation between institutional and non-institutional forensic psychiatric care: important influences on the transition process.2012Inngår i: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 19, s. 729-737Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    ACCESSIBLE SUMMARY: •  All patients cared for in Forensic Psychiatric Care (FPC) have some kind of psychiatric disorder and most of them have committed one or more criminal acts. In addition, several of the patients have alcohol and drug problems. •  During the stay in institutional FPC, one part of the rehabilitation program is to prepare the patient for non-institutional FPC. However, several patients fail with the rehabilitation. •  This study focuses important aspects that influence the patients' ability to manage their rehabilitation through admission to non-institutional FPC, viewed from different caregivers' perspective. •  The transition is influenced by a well-planned care plan, together with a suitable non-institutional dwelling and a tailored occupation. A major barrier for successful admission was whether the patients managed their own finances or not. Other important areas were having a well-functioning and trusting social network and a good relationship with a contact person. ABSTRACT: All patients cared for in forensic psychiatric care (FPC) have some kind of psychiatric disorder and most of them have committed one or more criminal acts. One part of the patient's rehabilitation is the transition from institutional to non-institutional FPC, but a number of patients do not succeed. The aim of this study was to elucidate different caregivers' experiences of aspects that influence the patients' ability to manage this rehabilitation. A qualitative approach was chosen. Data were collected by interviews in two focus groups, each group comprising of six caregivers representing both institutional and non-institutional FPC. The transcribed interviews were analysed using a qualitative content analysis. Important aspects influencing the patients' transition described were a well-planned care plan, together with a suitable non-institutional dwelling and a tailored occupation. Other important areas were having a well-functioning and trusting social network and a good relationship with a contact person/advocate. A major barrier to a successful transition was whether the patients managed their own finances or not. It was stated that it is important that the patients participate in the care and that different authorities create individual conditions and flexible solutions. All of these factors are important to focus on when caring for patients during their stay in the institutional FPC.

  • 4.
    Robertz, A C
    et al.
    Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Outpatient Clinic Uddevalla, NU Hospital Group, Region Västra Götaland, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Rudolfsson, Gudrun
    Högskolan Väst, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Avdelningen för omvårdnad - avancerad nivå.
    Tactile massage as a nursing intervention in child and adolescent psychiatry: nurses' experiences2016Inngår i: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 23, nr 8, s. 502-512Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE SUBJECT?: There is little research on the implementation of tactile massage in child and adolescent psychiatry that describes children's and adolescents' experiences and outcomes. There is also limited knowledge of providing tactile massage in child and adolescent psychiatry. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This paper describes 10 nurses' experiences of tactile massage as a nursing intervention in child and adolescent psychiatry. The nurses considered tactile massage a non-verbal nursing intervention that could complement other available treatments. It reveals their reflections on the impact of tactile massage on their nursing and on themselves as a person, including the belief that they had developed deepened self-reflection and attentiveness. The nurses highlighted the importance of providing a trusting environment and collaborating with the children and adolescents. They both experienced and observed that tactile massage triggered various physical and mental processes in the children and adolescents, such as improvement in sleep disturbances, an ability to relax in body and mind and a deeper connectedness with their own bodies and feelings. The nurses described instructing next of kin in the use of tactile massage, which they believed could serve as a tool at home, mainly as a way for next of kin to help their children to relax, fall asleep more easily and to deepen connectedness. However, the nurses stressed the need to consider if it was appropriate or desired by the children and adolescents. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Tactile massage addresses the individual's emotional and physiological responses and could therefore bring holistic nursing to child and adolescent psychiatry. It could also help nurses in child and adolescent psychiatry to develop their attentiveness and sensitivity in acknowledging the needs of children and adolescents in psychiatric care.

    ABSTRACT:

    Introduction There is limited research on tactile massage in child and adolescent psychiatry and no studies investigating experiences of providing tactile massage in child and adolescent psychiatry were found. Aim The aim was therefore to describe nurses' experiences of providing tactile massage as a nursing intervention in child and adolescent psychiatry. Method Ten nurses trained in tactile massage and employed at five different child and adolescent psychiatry clinics in Sweden participated in a qualitative study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted, transcribed verbatim and analysed by qualitative content analysis. Results Three categories emerged from the analysis. 'Confirming body and mind', 'Building a trusting relationship' and 'Instructing next of kin in tactile massage'. Attentiveness to and respect for the integrity of the children and adolescents were essential for creating a trusting relationship with them. Tactile massage was found to trigger various physical and mental processes in the children and adolescents. The nurses reflected on the impact of tactile massage on their nursing and on themselves as a person, stating that it had led to the development of self-reflection and attentiveness. Implications for practice Tactile massage addresses the individual's emotional and physiological responses and could therefore bring holistic nursing to child and adolescent psychiatry. It might also enhance attentiveness and sensitivity on the part of child and adolescent psychiatry nurses when acknowledging the needs of children and adolescents in psychiatric care.

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