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  • 1.
    Glatz, Terese
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro (SWE).
    Daneback, Kristian
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Alsarve, Jenny
    Örebro University, Örebro (SWE).
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Parents’ Feelings, Distress, and Self-Efficacy in Response to Social Comparisons on Social Media2023In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843, Vol. 32, no 8, p. 2453-2464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parents’ social comparisons on social networking sites (SNS) is a research area of growing interest. In this study, we examined parents’ positive and negative feelings when comparing with other parents and associations with self-reported distress (i.e., stress and depression) and self-efficacy. We used a sample of 422 Swedish parents of children below the age offive (Mage = 1.29 years). In a first step, we examined construct validity of two new measures on parents’ positive and negative feelings when doing comparisons on SNS. In a second step, we examined associations with self-reported parenting.

    Results showed that parents reported more positive feelings than negative feelings in relation to other parents on SNS.

    Further, negative feelings when doing social comparisons were linked to more distress and lower level of self-efficacy, where as positive feelings when doing social comparisons predicted higher level of self-efficacy, but not distress. These results suggest that negative feelings are related to lower actual levels of distress and self-efficacy, but positive feelings can have an instant positive effect on parents’ perceived competence, but not on their well-being. Practitioners can encourage parents to reflect on who they compare with on SNS and why, as it might enable evaluations that could lead to selfimprovement rather than weakening of oneself as a parent.

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    fulltext
  • 2.
    Osman, Fatumo
    et al.
    Department of Health and Welfare, Dalarna University, Falun (SWE).
    Randell, Eva
    Department of Health and Welfare, Dalarna University, Falun (SWE).
    Mohamed, Abdikerim
    Department of Health and Welfare, Dalarna University, Falun (SWE).
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Dialectical Processes in Parent-child Relationships among Somali Families in Sweden2021In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 1752-1762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-voluntary migration has been demonstrated to have an impact on family relationships as a result of children acculturating to the host country faster than their parents. Studies have reported on immigrant parents’ perceptions of their parenting in host countries. However, less is known about how both children and parents view and make sense of their relationships in new contexts. This exploratory qualitative study aims to capture the dialectical processes in parent-child relationships among Somali families in Sweden. Data were collected using focus group discussions with youth (n = 47) and their parents (n = 33). The data were analysed using a thematic analysis. Two themes, each with three themes of their own, were identified from the analysis: finding a balance between hierarchical and egalitarian relationships and sharing of spaces. Youth and parents described different factors, including contextual changes, generational gaps, peer pressure and lack of a father figures, as affecting their relationships with each other and sometimes creating conflicts between them. Both perceived themselves as active agents in contributing to family life after migrating to Sweden. In general, the youth expressed their emotional needs, the motivations desired from their parents and their desire to be equally treated as sons and daughters. Overall, this study demonstrates that there is a need to offer immigrant families culturally tailored parenting support programmes, thereby strengthening parent-child relationships.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Rothenberg, W. Andrew
    et al.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham (USA);Mailman Center for Child Development, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami (USA) .
    Ali, Sumbleen
    The State University of New York College at Oneonta, Oneonta (USA).
    Rohner, Ronald P.
    The State University of New York College at Oneonta, Oneonta (USA); University of Connecticut, Storrs (USA).
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham (USA).
    Britner, Preston. A.
    The State University of New York College at Oneonta, Oneonta (USA); University of Connecticut, Storrs (USA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Rome, (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham (USA).
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham (USA).
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Kisumu (KEN).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Rome (ITA).
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham (USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia (USA); King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (SAU).
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Bogotá (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City (PHL).
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Zarqa (JOR).
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples (ITA).
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda (USA); UNICEF, New York (USA); Institute for Fiscal Studies, London (GBR).
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Macau (CHN).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst (USA).
    Effects of Parental Acceptance-Rejection on Children's Internalizing and Externalizing Behaviors: A Longitudinal, Multicultural Study2021In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 29-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Grounded in Interpersonal Acceptance-Rejection Theory, this study assessed children's (N = 1315) perceptions of maternal and paternal acceptance-rejection in nine countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States) as predictors of children's externalizing and internalizing behaviors across ages 7-14 years. Parenting behaviors were measured using children's reports on the Parental Acceptance-Rejection Questionnaire. Child externalizing and internalizing behaviors were measured using mother, father, and child reports on the Achenbach System of Empirically-Based Assessment. Using a multilevel modeling framework, we found that in cultures where both maternal and paternal indifference/neglect scores were higher than average-compared to other cultures-children's internalizing problems were more persistent. At the within-culture level, all four forms of maternal and paternal rejection (i.e., coldness/lack of affection, hostility/aggression, indifference/neglect, and undifferentiated rejection) were independently associated with either externalizing and internalizing problems across ages 7-14 even after controlling for child gender, parent education, and each of the four forms of parental rejection. Results demonstrate that the effects of perceived parental acceptance-rejection are panculturally similar. 

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