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  • 1.
    Haas, Linda
    et al.
    Department of Sociology, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Hwang, Philip
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Policy is not enough: the influence of the gendered workplace on fathers' use of parental leave in Sweden2019In: Community, Work and Family, ISSN 1366-8803, E-ISSN 1469-3615, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 58-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Paid parental leave for fathers is a promising social policy tool for degendering the division of labor for childcare. Swedish fathers have had the right to paid parental leave since 1974, but they take only one-fourth of leave days parents take. There are strong cultural norms supporting involved fatherhood, so couples typically want to share leave more than they do. This article explores how workplaces can constrain Swedish fathers' use of state leave policy, in ways that fathers can take for granted, a topic that has received less attention than individual or family-related obstacles. Based on interviews with 56 employees in five large private companies, we found that masculine workplace norms can make it difficult for fathers to choose to take much leave, while aspects of traditional workplace structure building on these norms can negatively affect fathers' capabilities of taking much leave. Workplace culture and structure seemed to be based on assumptions that the ideal worker should prioritize work and has limited caregiving responsibilities, setting limits to fathers' ability to share leave with mothers. Gender theorists suggest such assumptions persist because of male dominance at the workplace and the endurance of gendered assumptions about the roles of men and women.

  • 2.
    Haas, Linda
    et al.
    Department of Sociology, Indiana University,, Indianapolis, USA.
    Hwang, Philip
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. b Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Workplace support and European fathers' use of state policies promoting shared childcare2019In: Community, Work and Family, ISSN 1366-8803, E-ISSN 1469-3615, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 1-22Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Social policies such as paternity leave and parental leave offer fathers the opportunity to be more involved in childcare than earlier generations of fathers. While such policies are increasingly offered by governments around the world, research by the International Network on Leave Policies and Research shows that many European fathers do not take advantage of these benefits, despite fathers' growing interest in participation in early childcare. This article introduces a special issue devoted to understanding how the workplace can impact European fathers' interest in and abilities to take leave, a topic that has received relatively little research attention. The articles in the special issue suggest that barriers to European fathers' leavetaking are deeply embedded in workplace culture and work practices and will be difficult to eradicate without a dramatic challenge to the concept of the male ideal worker, who prioritizes work above family.

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