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  • 1.
    Islind, Anna Sigridur
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics. Reykjavik University, School of Computer Science, Iceland.
    Lindroth, Tomas
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundin, Johan
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Shift in translations: Data work with patient-generated health data in clinical practice2019In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 577-586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on how the introduction of patient-generated health data affects the nurses’ and patients’ data work and unpacks how new forms of data collection trigger shifts in the work with data through translation work. The article is based on a 2.5-year case study examining data work of nurses and patients at a cancer rehabilitation clinic at a Swedish Hospital in which patient-generated health data are gathered by patients and then used outside and within clinical practice for decision-making. The article reports on how data are prepared and translated, that is, made useful by the nurses and patients. Using patient-generated health data alters the data work and how the translation of data is performed. The shift in work has three components: (1) a shift in question tactics, (2) a shift in decision-making, and (3) a shift in distribution. The data become mobile, and the data work becomes distributed when using patient-generated health data as an active part of care

  • 2.
    Vallo Hult, Helena
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics. NU Hospital Group, Sweden.
    Hansson, Anders
    Örebro University, University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicin and Health, Sweden.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Gellerstedt, Martin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Flipped healthcare for better or worse2019In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 587-597Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The medical profession is highly specialized, demanding continuous learning, while also undergoing rapid development in the rise of data-driven healthcare. Based on clinical scenarios, this study explores how resident physicians view their roles and practices in relation to informed patients and patient-centric digital technologies. The paper illustrates how the new role of patients alters physicians’ work and use of data to learn and update their professional practice. It suggests new possibilities for developing collegial competence and using patient experiences more systematically. Drawing on the notion of flipped healthcare, we argue that there is a need for new professional competencies in everyday data work, along with a change in attitudes, newly defined roles, and better ways to identify and develop reliable online sources. Finally, the role of patients, not only as consumers but also producers of healthcare, is a rather formidable and complex cultural change to be addressed. © The Author(s) 2019.

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