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  • 1.
    Elefante, Arianna
    et al.
    University of Bari, Physics Department, Via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari, Italy.
    Nilsen, Morgan
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Sikström, Fredrik
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Christiansson, Anna-Karin
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Maggipinto, Tommaso
    University of Bari, Physics Department, Via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari, Italy.
    Ancona, Antonio
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems. IFN-CNR Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies, Physics Department, Via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari, Italy.
    Detecting beam offsets in laser welding of closed-square-butt joints by wavelet analysis of an optical process signal2019In: Optics and Laser Technology, ISSN 0030-3992, E-ISSN 1879-2545, Vol. 109, p. 178-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Robotized laser beam welding of closed-square-butt joints is sensitive to the positioning of the laser beam with respect to the joint since even a small offset may result in a detrimental lack of sidewall fusion. An evaluation of a system using a photodiode aligned coaxial to the processing laser beam confirms the ability to detect variations of the process conditions, such as when there is an evolution of an offset between the laser beam and the joint. Welding with different robot trajectories and with the processing laser operating in both continuous and pulsed mode provided data for this evaluation. The detection method uses wavelet analysis of the photodetector signal that carries information of the process condition revealed by the plasma plume optical emissions during welding. This experimental data have been evaluated offline. The results show the potential of this detection method that is clearly beneficial for the development of a system for welding joint tracking.

  • 2.
    Nilsen, Morgan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Sikström, Fredrik
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Christiansson, Anna-Karin
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Ancona, Antonio
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems. IFN-CNR Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies, Physics Department, via Amendola 173, 70126 BARI, Italy.
    Vision and spectroscopic sensing for joint tracing in narrow gap laser butt welding2017In: Optics and Laser Technology, ISSN 0030-3992, E-ISSN 1879-2545, Vol. 96, p. 107-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The automated laser beam butt welding process is sensitive to positioning the laser beam with respect to the joint because a small offset may result in detrimental lack of sidewall fusion. This problem is even more pronounced incase of narrow gap butt welding, where most of the commercial automatic joint tracing system fail to detect the exact position and size of the gap. In this work, adual vision and spectroscopic sensing approach is proposed to trace narrow gap butt joints during laser welding. The system consists of a camera with suitable illumination and matched optical filters and a fast miniature spectrometer. An image processing algorithm of the camera recordings has been developed in order to estimate the laser spot position relative the joint position. The spectral emissions from the laser induced plasma plume has been acquired by the spectrometer, and based on the measurements of the intensities of selected lines of the spectrum, the electron temperature signal has been calculated and correlated to variations of process conditions. The individual performances of these two systems have been experimentally investigated and evaluated offline by data from several welding experiments where artificial abrupt as well as gradual excursions of the laser beam out of the joint were produced. Results indicate thata combination of the information provided by the vision and spectroscopic systems is beneficial for development of a hybrid sensing system for joint tracing.

  • 3.
    Segerstark, Andreas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Andersson, Joel
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Svensson, Lars-Erik
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Investigation of laser metal deposited Alloy 718 onto an EN 1.4401 stainless steel substrate2017In: Optics and Laser Technology, ISSN 0030-3992, E-ISSN 1879-2545, Vol. 97, no Supplement C, p. 144-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on how process parameters affect the deposition of Alloy 718 onto an EN 1.4401 stainless steel substrate in terms of secondary phase formation, dilution and hardness. A columnar solidification structure with elongated grains growing in the direction normal to the substrate was observed for all parameters. In the interdendritic regions, phases with a high content of Niobium were identified. Scanning Electron Microscopy imaging and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy measurements revealed these phases to most likely be Laves phase and Nb-carbides. Temperature measurements indicated no significant aging in the deposits. Considerable enrichment of iron was found in the initially deposited layers due to dilution from the substrate. The increased content of iron seemed to aid in forming constituents rich in niobium which, in turn, influenced the hardness. The highest mean hardness was noted in the sample with the lowest area fraction of Nb-rich constituents.

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