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  • 1.
    Boman, Åse
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Eklöf, Mats
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Psychology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Forsander, Gun
    The Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Munthe, Christian
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Philosophy, Linguistics and Theory of Science, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Törner, Marianne
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Health care to empower self-care in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus and an immigrant minority background2017In: SAGE Open Medicine, E-ISSN 2050-3121, Vol. 5, article id 2050312117700056Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The pediatric diabetes team aims to support health, quality of life, and normal growth and development among adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Adolescents with an immigrant background have been found less successful in self-care. Previous research indicated that adolescents who had integrated the disease as a part of their self-image reasoned differently about their self-care to those who had not.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify elements in the patient-pediatrician consultations that might influence such integration of the disease among adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    METHODS: A total of 12 pediatrician-adolescent consultations were video-recorded and analyzed. The adolescents all had an immigrant background.

    RESULTS: Integration of the disease appeared enabled when responsibility was shared; when hope, autonomy, and emotions were confirmed; and when the pediatrician asked probing questions. Letting objective data dominate the adolescent's experiences, using risk as a motivator, neutralizing emotions in relation to having diabetes, and confirming forgetfulness, may instead inhibit disease integration.

    CONCLUSION: An extended person-centered approach with focus on the adolescent's experiences of everyday life with a chronic disease and less attention on physical parameters in the pediatrician-adolescent consultations may increase integration of the disease.

  • 2.
    Zouini, Btissame
    et al.
    Abdelmalek Essaadi University, Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Tetouan, Morocco.
    Sfendla, Anis
    Abdelmalek Essaadi University, Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Tetouan, Morocco.
    Senhaji, Meftaha
    Abdelmalek Essaadi University, Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Tetouan, Morocco.
    Råstam, Maria
    Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences,Lund, Sweden.
    Kerekes, Nora
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Somatic health and its association with negative psychosocial factors in a sample of Moroccan adolescents2019In: SAGE Open Medicine, E-ISSN 2050-3121, Vol. 7, article id 2050312119852527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Adolescence is a distinct developmental phase characterized by multiple physical and psychological changes andby an increased vulnerability to somatic and mental health problems. These risk and vulnerability factors are part of a complexbiopsychosocial matrix, encompassing multiple factors, such as inherited biological determinants and psychological, societal,and cultural influences, which affect an adolescent's overall wellbeing. In Morocco, similar to other developing countries,adolescents (young people aged from 15 to 19years) constitute a substantial proportion of the population (almost 9%).However, studies about adolescents' health in developing countries are scarce. In this study, we describe adolescents' somatichealth in a sample of high school students from the city of Tetouan, Morocco, and investigate how negative psychosocialfactors, such as parental alcohol use problems and/or the experience of abuse, may influence them.Methods: The study sample included 655 adolescents (315 boys and 340 girls, M=16.64years, range=15–18years) fromconviniently selected classes of four high schools in the city of Tetouan in Morocco. The students responded to a survey thatassessed the prevalence of somatic complaints/disorders. They also indicated whether they had ever experienced physicaland/or psychological abuse and whether they had parents with alcohol use problems.Results: More than half of the adolescents suffered from headaches and one-third had substantial problems with diarrhea orconstipation. Both problems were more common in female students. The third most frequent somatic problem, affecting onein four in both genders, was allergy. Almost one-third of Moroccan adolescents (significantly more boys than girls; p=0.004)reported no somatic complaints. In adolescents who reported parental alcohol use problems and/or experience of physicaland/or psychological abuse, the prevalence of several somatic complaints (epilepsy, migraine, headache, diarrhea/constipation,gluten intolerance, allergy, and skin or thyroid disease) increased highly significantly compared to the adolescents whoreported no such psychosocial environmental factors.Conclusion: The results suggest that only 3 in 10 urban-living Moroccan adolescents are free of somatic complaints, whilethe majority suffer from some somatic problems, most often headaches and diarrhea/constipation. The association of certainnegative psychosocial factors with adolescents' somatic health suggests the need of a holistic approach to the treatment of affectedadolescents.

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