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  • 1.
    Agic, Adnan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing. Seco Tools AB,Fagersta, Sweden.
    Gutnichenko, O.
    Division of Production and Materials Engineering, Lund University, Sweden.
    Eynian, Mahdi
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Ståhl, J-E
    Division of Production and Materials Engineering, Lund University, Sweden.
    Influence of cutting edge geometry on force build-up process in intermittent turning2016In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 46, p. 364-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the intermittent turning and milling processes, during the entry phase the cutting edges are subjected to high impact loads that can give rise to dynamical and strength issues which in general cause tool life reduction. In this study the effect of geometrical features of the cutting tool on the force generation during the entry phase is investigated. Cutting forces are measured by a stiff dynamometer at a high sampling frequency. In addition, the chip load area is analyzed and related to the measured cutting force. The results show that micro-geometrical features, in particular the protection chamfer, significantly affect the force generation during the entry phase.

  • 2.
    Anderberg, Staffan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Pejryd, Lars
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Process planning for cnc machining of swedish subcontractors: A web survey2014In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 17, p. 732-737Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Process planning of CNC machining is critical to ensure cost, time and quality parameters of manufacturing operations. At the heart of process planning is, typically the process planner, who must make a multitude of decisions regarding machines, cutting strategies, tools and process parameters etc. Today there are a number of different tools and methods available to aid the process planner. This paper explores today’s industrial use of some of these aids and outlinespotential underlying reasons for the current state. The empirical data is based on a questionnaire survey of Swedish CNC machining sub-contractors. The main conclusion is that despite a long history of development of various aids (CAD/CAM, PLM standards etc.) there is still a large proportion of the industry, which has not yet adopted these aids. By the responding companies 32% do not use any CAM system and only 2% use a PLM system. On the other side of the spectrum is a group of 25% that uses CAM in 75% or more of their planned products. The learning from this survey can be used to better understand the industrial needs and focus research and development efforts.

  • 3.
    Bennulf, Mattias
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production System.
    Svensson, Bo
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production System.
    Danielsson, Fredrik
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production System.
    Verification and deployment of automatically generated robot programs used in prefabrication of house walls2018In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 72, p. 272-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a method for automating the generation, verification and deployment of robot programs used in prefabrication of walls for family houses. The making of robot programs is today performed manually by experts, i.e. implying high costs. This is a huge disadvantage since each wall can be unique. The work demonstrates, with implementation and testing, a method to automate the generation of robot programs for fabrication of walls made of wood. This includes the task of generating collision free paths, automatic verification of path performance and deploying to a real industrial robot with minimal human interaction. © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  • 4.
    Beno, Tomas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Hulling, U
    Volvo Aero Corporation, Trollhättan.
    Measurement of cutting edge temperature in drilling2012In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 3, p. 531-536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper a methodology is described to conduct temperature measurement on the cutting edges and the clearance faces on twist drills using a fibre optic two color pyrometer. Two measuring positions of the fibre were used in order to determine the temperature at two different locations, centre and outer corner of the drill. The measurements were carried out on a stationary work piece and a rotating drill. The work piece materials ranged from tool steel, aged Inconel 718, Ti6-4 to carbon epoxy fibre composite. All experiments were conducted in dry machining conditions.© 2012 The Authors.

  • 5.
    Bonilla Hernández, Ana Esther
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Fredriksson, Claes
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Industrial Engineering and Management, Electrical- and Mechanical Engineering.
    Energy and Cost Estimation of a Feature-based Machining Operation on HRSA2017In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 61, no Supplement C, p. 511-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forward-looking manufacturing companies aim for sustainable production with low environmental footprint. This is true also for aerospace engine-makers, although their environmental impact mostly occurs during the use-phase of their products. Materials, such as Nickel alloys, are used for special applications where other materials will not withstand tough working conditions in terms of pressure and temperature. Heat Resistant Super Alloys are, however, considered difficult to machine and cutting tools will wear off rapidly. In this paper, a simple way to estimate the energy required, the cost and environmental footprint to produce a work piece using standard engineering software is presented. The results show that for a hypothetical 3 tonne work piece, Inconel 718 will be considerably cheaper and require less water but will require more energy, and has considerably larger CO2 footprint than Waspaloy.

  • 6.
    Bonilla Hernández, Ana Esther
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Repo, Jari
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Wretland, Anders
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Analysis of Tool Utilization from Material Removal Rate Perspective2015In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 29, p. 109-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An end of life strategy algorithm has been used to study a CNC program to evaluate how the cutting inserts are used in terms of their full utilization. Utilized tool life (UTL) and remaining tool life (RTL) were used to evaluate if the insert has been used to its limits of expected tool life, or contributing to an accumulated tool waste. It is demonstrated that possible means to improvement exists to increase the material removal rate (MRR), thereby using the insert until its remaining tool life is as close to zero as possible. It was frequently found that inserts were used well below their maximum performance with respect to cutting velocity.

  • 7.
    Devotta, Ashwin Moris
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. Sandvik Coromant AB, Sandviken, Sweden.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Löf, Ronnie
    Sandvik Coromant AB, Sandviken, Sweden.
    Espes, Emil
    Sandvik Coromant AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Quantitative Characterization of Chip Morphology Using Computed Tomography in Orthogonal Turning Process2015In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 33, p. 299-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract The simulation of machining process has been an area of active research for over two decades. To fully incorporate finite element (FE) simulations as a state of art tool design aid, there is a need for higher accuracy methodology. An area of improvement is the prediction of chip shape in FE simulations. Characterization of chip shape is therefore a necessity to validate the FE simulations with experimental investigations. The aim of this paper is to present an investigation where computed tomography (CT) is used for the characterization of the chip shape obtained from 2D orthogonal turning experiments. In this work, the CT method has been used for obtaining the full 3D representation of a machined chip. The CT method is highly advantageous for the complex curled chip shapes besides its ability to capture microscopic features on the chip like lamellae structure and surface roughness. This new methodology aids in the validation of several key parameters representing chip shape. The chip morphology’s 3D representation is obtained with the necessary accuracy which provides the ability to use chip curl as a practical validation tool for FE simulation of chip formation in practical machining operations. The study clearly states the ability of the new CT methodology to be used as a tool for the characterization of chip morphology in chip formation studies and industrial applications.

  • 8.
    Devotta, Ashwin Moris
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Siriki, Ravendra
    Sandvik Materials Technology, Sandviken, Sweden.
    Löf, Ronnie
    Sandvik Coromant AB, Sandviken, Sweden.
    Eynian, Mahdi
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Finite Element Modeling and Validation of Chip Segmentation in Machining of AISI 1045 Steel2017In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 58, p. 499-504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The finite element (FE) method based modeling of chip formation in machining provides the ability to predict output parameters like cutting forces and chip geometry. One of the important characteristics of chip morphology is chip segmentation. Majority of the literature within chip segmentation show cutting speed (vc) and feed rate (f) as the most influencing input parameters. The role of tool rake angle (α) on chip segmentation is limited and hence, the present study is aimed at understanding it. In addition, stress triaxiality’s importance in damage model employed in FE method in capturing the influence of α on chip morphology transformation is also studied. Furthermore, microstructure characterization of chips was carried out using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to understand the chip formation process for certain cutting conditions. The results show that the tool α influences chip segmentation phenomena and that the incorporation of a stress triaxiality factor in damage models is required to be able to predict the influence of the α. The variation of chip segmentation frequency with f is predicted qualitatively but the accuracy of prediction needs improvement. © 2017 The Authors.

  • 9.
    Eynian, Mahdi
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Frequency Domain Study of Vibrations above and under Stability Lobes in Machining Systems2014In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 14, p. 164-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using modified Nyquist contours, the dominant poles of the closed loop delay-differential equation for machining systems such as milling are identified. Contours with constant damping ratio of the dominant poles are constructed using this method. These contours are similar in shape to the stability lobes, but move upwards and to the right as the instability parameter increases. Additionally, it is possible to study the movement of the dominant poles to the right-hand side of the complex plane as the system becomes unstable by increasing the depth of cut at a constant spindle speed. The movement of the dominant pole is shown to be towards the right (unstable) and upward (higher vibration frequency) of the complex plane. In some cases, there would be a jump of vibration frequency due to the change of the lobe number. It is also shown that the damping ratio of the structure strongly affects both the vibration frequency and the damping ratio of the dominant poles in the closed loop system. Finally, in two milling experiments with two different spindle speeds and continuously increasing depth of cuts, vibration frequencies are measured and compared to the theoretical predictions. The measurements agree with the theoretical predictions, particularly in the unstable cutting conditions.

  • 10.
    Gutnichenko, O
    et al.
    Division of Production and Materials Engineering, Lund University, Lund, S-22100, Sweden.
    Agic, Adnan
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing. SECO Tools AB, Björnbacksvägen 2, Fagersta, 73782, Sweden.
    Ståhl, J-E
    Division of Production and Materials Engineering, Lund University, Lund, S-22100, Sweden.
    Modeling of Force Build-up Process and Optimization of Tool Geometry when Intermittent Turning2017In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 58, p. 393-398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intermittent turning the slotted workpieces is always accompanied with a high impact load of the machine tool during the entry phase of the cutting edge. The process leads to a strong dynamic response of the system and results in vibrations arose and potential tool life and surface finish issues. The present study addresses the modeling of cutting force build-up process with further optimization of cutting edge geometry where tooltip overshoot during the tool entry is selected as an objective function. The model takes into consideration the interaction between three units of the machine tool such as a tool, toolpost, and workpiece as well as an influence of the process on the system's dynamics.

  • 11.
    Holmberg, Jonas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing. Swerea IVF AB, Argongatan 30, Mölndal SE-431 53, Sweden.
    Prieto, Juan Manuel Rodri­guez
    Luleå University of Technology, Division of Mechanics of Solid Materials Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics. Luleå SE-971 87, Sweden.
    Berglund, Johan
    Swerea IVF AB, Argongatan 30, Mölndal SE-431 53, Sweden.
    Sveboda, Ales
    Luleå University of Technology, Division of Mechanics of Solid Materials Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics. Luleå SE-971 87, Sweden.
    Jonsén, Pärr
    Luleå University of Technology, Division of Mechanics of Solid Materials Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics. Luleå SE-971 87, Sweden.
    Experimental and PFEM-simulations of residual stresses from turning tests of a cylindrical Ti-6Al-4V shaft2018In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 71, p. 144-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alloy Ti-6Al-4V is a frequently used material in aero space applications due the high strength and low weight. This material is however often considered as a difficult to machine alloy due to several material properties such as the inherent characteristics of high hot hardness and strength which is causing an increased deformation of the cutting tool during machining. The thermal properties also cause a low thermal diffusion from locally high temperatures in the cutting zone that allows for reaction to the tool material resulting in increased tool wear. Predicting the behavior of machining of this alloy is therefore essential when selecting machining tools or machining strategies. If the surface integrity is predicted, the influence of different machining parameters could be studied using Particle Finite Element (PFEM)-simulations. In this investigation the influence from cutting speed and feed during turning on the residual stresses has been measured using x-ray diffraction and compared to PFEM-simulations. The results showed that cutting speed and feed have great impact on the residual stress state. The measured cutting force showed a strong correlation especially to the cutting feed. The microstructure, observed in SEM, showed highly deformed grains at the surface from the impact of the turning operation and the full width half maximum from the XDR measurements distinguish a clear impact from different cutting speed and feed which differed most for the higher feed rate. The experimental measurements of the residual stresses and the PFEM simulations did however not correlate. The surface stresses as well as the sign of the residuals stresses differed which might be due to the material model used and the assumption of using a Coulomb friction model that might not represent the cutting conditions in the investigated case.

  • 12.
    Johansson, Anders
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. Global Industrial Development, Scania CV AB, Södertälje.
    Gustavsson Christiernin, Linn
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production System.
    Pejryd, Lars
    School of Science and Technology, Örebro University.
    Manufacturing System Design for Business Value, a Holistic Design Approach2016In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 50, p. 659-664Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When designing and developing manufacturing systems, many aspects need to be considered. Typically, the manufacturing design objectives are specified to achieve certain operational requirements around quality, capacity, cost etc. They are also specified withthe intention to ensure efficient processes related to manufacturing, such as maintenance, logistics, not to mention the main process of manufacturing the actual part. This study proposes that a wider company perspective should be considered during manufacturing system design, to achieve a greater business value. The manufacturing system should be designed to create value to other core business processes, such as product development, marketing, sales and services. This paper also presents examples on value perspectives to consider and how this approach can be implemented.

  • 13.
    Johansson, Anders
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. Global Industrial Development, Scania CV AB, Södertälje.
    Pejryd, Lars
    School of Science and Technology, Örebro University.
    Gustavsson Christiernin, Linn
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Consideration of market demand volatility risks, when making manufacturing system investments2016In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 40, p. 307-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When investing in new manufacturing systems, many aspects must be taken into consideration to ensure a sustainable business. In respect to the financial aspect, both the one-off investment cost and the continuous operational cost must be analysed to ensure that the life-cycle cost perspective is appreciated. However, one detail in the cost analyses that is often overlooked is the composition of fixed and variable cost elements. These details are important to be able to better manage the risk of market demand volatility, and accordingly make appropriateinvestment decisions. This case study demonstrates that when there is a low risk for reduced market demand, investing in a manufacturing system with low variable cost is favourable. However, if there is a high risk for reduced market demand, the importance will instead be to have a low fixed cost, as this will be the dominant cost factor.

  • 14.
    Johansson, Anders
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. Global Industrial Development, Scania CV AB, Södertälje.
    Pejryd, Lars
    School of Science and Technology, Örebro University.
    Gustavsson Christiernin, Linn
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production System.
    Production support model to manage market demand volatility risks2016In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 57C, p. 664-668Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the investment selection process during the design of new manufacturing systems, both the technical attributes and the expected financial performance need to be evaluated. To manage the financial risks with market volatility, it is important to understand the composition of fixed and variable cost factors in relation to the expected volume interval. The support model developed in this paper will in a simple and intuitive way visualise the effect on production cost due to changes in market demands. It can also be used to evaluate the volume sensitivity of existing manufacturing systems, even compare systems making different products.

  • 15.
    Jäger, Henrik
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing. Swerea-KIMAB AB, 164 40, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tamil Alagan, Nageswaran
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Holmberg, Jonas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing. Swerea-IVF AB, 431 22, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Vretland, Anders
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB, 461 81, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    EDS Analysis of Flank Wear and Surface Integrity in Machining of Alloy 718 with Forced Coolant Application2016In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 45, p. 271-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been extensive research on forced coolant application, usually known as high pressure coolant, in machining heat resistant super alloys. This technology has shown to improve the tool life, chip segmentation, surface integrity and reduce the temperature in the cutting zone. A number of studies have been done on hydraulic parameters of the coolant. This study has been focused on residues on the flank face of the insert and residual stress on the workpiece surface generated by regular and modified cutting inserts. To identify any residual elements, analysis were done by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, EDS, on regular as well as modified inserts in combination with forced coolant application on both rake and flank face. The investigations have shown that the temperature gradient in the insert has changed between the regular and modified cutting inserts and that the tool wear and surface roughness is significantly affected by the modified cutting tool.

  • 16.
    Parsian, Amir
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Magnevall, Martin
    AB Sandvik Coromant, SE-811 81 Sandviken, Sweden.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Eynian, Mahdi
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    A Mechanistic Approach to Model Cutting Forces in Drilling with Indexable Inserts2014In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 24, no 0, p. 74-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Holes are made in many industrial parts that need screws, pins or channels for passing fluids. The general method to produce holes in metal cutting is by drilling operations. Indexable insert drills are often used to make short holes at a low cost. However, indexable drills are prone to vibrate under certain circumstances, causing vibrations that affect tool life. Therefore, a good prediction of cutting-forces in drilling is important to get a good description of the cutting process for optimization of tool body and insert design. Reliable simulations of dynamic forces also aid in prediction of chatter vibrations that have significant effects on the quality of the manufactured parts as well as the tool life. In this paper, a mechanistic approach is used to model the cutting-forces. Cutting-force coefficients are identified from measured instantaneous forces in drilling operations. These coefficients are used for simulating torque around drill-axis, axial force and cutting-forces in the plane perpendicular to drill-axis. The forces are modeled separately for peripheral and central insert, which results in a detailed description of the cutting-forces acting on each insert. The forces acting on each insert are estimated by dividing the cutting edges into small segments and the cutting-forces acting on each segment are calculated. The total forces are predicted by summation of the forces acting on each segment. Simulated torque and forces are compared to measured cutting-forces for two different feeds. A good agreement between predicted and experimental results, especially in torque and axial-force, is observed.

  • 17.
    Parsian, Amir
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. Sandvik Coromant, SE-811 81 Sandviken, Sweden.
    Magnevall, Martin
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing. Sandvik Coromant, Sandviken, Sweden.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Eynian, Mahdi
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Sound Analysis in Drilling, Frequency and Time Domains2017In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 58, p. 411-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes a guideline for interpreting frequency content and time history of sound measurements in metal drilling processes. Different dynamic phenomena are reflected in generated sound in cutting processes. The footprint of such phenomena including torsional, lateral regenerative chatter and whirling in sound measurement results are discussed. Different indexable insert drills, at several cutting conditions, are covered. The proposed analysis could be used for studying, online monitoring and controlling of drilling processes. © 2017 The Authors.

  • 18.
    Tamil Alagan, Nageswaran
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Wretland, Anders
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB, Trollhättan, 461 81, Sweden.
    Investigation of Modified Cutting Insert with Forced Coolant Application in Machining of Alloy 7182016In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 42, p. 481-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract In the last decades machining methods have witnessed an advancement in both cutting tools and coolant/lubrication, sometimes in combination with high pressure jet. The aim of this work is to investigate a modified cutting insert with forced coolant application, FCA, how it influences the tool-chip contact in the secondary shear zone and how it affects the tool wear when turning Alloy 718. During the machining process the main and frequent problems are heat generation and friction in the cutting zone, which has a direct impact on the cutting tool life. High pressure jet cooling have headwayed the cutting technology for the last five decades, showing an improvment of tool life, reduced temperature in the cutting zone and better surface integrity of the workpiece. These developments have practically enhanced the capability and quality in machining of superalloys. This paper is an advancement of the previous work, increasing surface area of the insert, with a additional channel design to improve the coolant reachability in the tool-chip contact area on the rake face. The influence in tool wear has been investigated. Through a set of experiments, a channel design insert with forced coolant application, has shown about 24-33% decrease in tool wear compared to only a textured insert. Hybrid inserts with its cooling and channel features have even widened the operational cutting region with significantly less tool wear.

  • 19.
    Wärmefjord, Kristina
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Dept. of Product and Production Development, SE-412 96 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Söderberg, Rikard
    Chalmers University of Technology, Dept. of Product and Production Development, SE-412 96 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Mikael
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Appelgren, Anders
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production System.
    Lundbäck, Andreas
    Luleå University of Technology, Dept. of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, SE-971 87 Luleå, Sweden.
    Lööf, Johan
    GKN Aerospace,Engine Systems, SE-461 81 Trollhättan, Sweden .
    Lindkvist, Lars
    Chalmers University of Technology, Dept. of Product and Production Development, SE-412 96 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svensson, Hans-Olof
    GKN Aerospace,Engine Systems, SE-461 81 Trollhättan, Sweden .
    Welding of non-nominal geometries: physical tests2016In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 43, p. 136-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The geometrical quality of a welded assembly is to some extent depending part positions before welding. Here, a design of experiment is set up in order to investigate this relation using physical tests in a controlled environment. Based on the experimental results it can be concluded that the influence of part position before welding is significant for geometrical deviation after welding. Furthermore, a working procedure for a completely virtual geometry assurance process for welded assemblies is outlined. In this process, part variations, assembly fixture variations and welding induced variations are important inputs when predicting the capability of the final assembly.

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