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  • 1.
    Islind, Anna Sigridur
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lindroth, Tomas
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Lundin, Johan
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Applied IT, IT Faculty, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    University of Gothenburg, Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Co-Designing a Digital Platform with Boundary Objects: Bringing Together Heterogeneous Users in Healthcare2019In: Health and Technology, ISSN 2190-7188, E-ISSN 2190-7196, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 425-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Healthcare is increasingly permeated with digital platforms supporting cooperative care involving different professional groups and also patients. New mobile technologies allow for patients to continuously monitor and document their symptoms to support better healthcare, as well as self-care. The successful design of such multi-user platforms calls for new design approaches involving heterogeneous conditions and goals. This paper analyzes theuse of boundary objects in design as a mediator for different users' needs and conditions. Our research is conducted at a clinic supporting cancer survivors in their struggles with treatment induced illnesses, a treatment heavily dependent on new medical research as well as on patient involvement. The data is collected ethnographically over two years following a design project that developed a digital platform to support the care provided by the clinic. We describe how useful boundary objects transform over time, from rich narratives, to conceptual formulations and finally into concrete prototypes of the platform. We argue that understanding such a transformation can inform the design of healthcare platforms and guide future design processes, where co-designing with boundary objects can be especially useful as a design approach when doing design complex settings, such as healthcare settings.

  • 2.
    Winman, Thomas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Säljö, Roger
    Department of Education, University of Gothenburg.
    Rystedt, Hans
    Department of Education, University of Gothenburg.
    Local knowing and the use of electronic patientrecords: categories and continuity of health care2012In: Health and Technology, ISSN 2190-7188, E-ISSN 2190-7196, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 185-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The electronic patient record (EPR) is a constitutive element of medical practice and can be conceived of as a multi-purpose tool that is intended to support a range of activities such as planning, decision-making and evaluation. Each of these activities is quite complex in its own right. The aim of the present study is to explore how the standardized format of EPRs intervenes in the work of sustaining continuity in patients ' care. In doing this we analyse ow this standardized format contributes to structure the production and use of information concerning patients' mundane problems in the context of rehabilitation. Data consists of observations, informal interviews and video-recordings from a ward for patients affected by stroke. The results show that there is a tension between the highly uniform structures and standards for documentation in EPRs, on the one hand, and, on the other, how information is designed and put into use by care providers. When staff members use EPRs, they constantly have to contextualize what is written in relation to what they know about patients and/or the current situation. On the local level, the increasing standardization that follows the introduction of EPRs will make it even more necessary for professionals to engage in such interpretative work to close the gap between the standardized categories of the EPR and contextually relevant health care interventions. In spite of requests for increasing standardization there will always be a need to adapt to specific needs for more flexible information structures. Otherwise, there may be the risk that non-standard features the initial standardization was intended to reduce may be re-introduced.

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