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  • 1.
    Berndtsson, Ina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Karlsson, Margareta
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Rejnö, Åsa
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. Stroke Unit, Skaraborg Hospital Skövde, Sweden.
    Nursing students' attitudes toward care of dying patients: A pre- and post-palliative course study2019In: Heliyon, E-ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 5, no 10, article id e02578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Many nursing students are not prepared to encounter death and care for patients who are at the end of life as newly educated nurses. The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of Dying Scale (FATCOD) has been used to assess nursing students' attitudes during their education and changes have been noted.

    Objective: To examine nursing students' attitudes towards care of dying patients before and after a course in palliative care.

    Design: A descriptive study with a pre and post design.

    Settings & participants: Nursing students (n = 73) enrolled in a mandatory palliative course in the nursing programme at a Swedish university.

    Methods: Data were collected before and after a palliative care course using FATCOD and qualitative open-ended questions. Data from FATCOD were analysed using descriptive and analytical statistics. The open-ended questions were analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The students' mean scores showed a statistically significant change toward a more positive attitude toward care of dying. Students with the lowest pre-course scores showed the highest mean change. The qualitative analysis showed that the students had gained additional knowledge, deepened understanding, and increased feelings of security through the course.

    Conclusions: A course in palliative care could help to change nursing students' attitudes towards care of patients who are dying and their relatives, in a positive direction. A course in palliative care is suggested to be mandatory in nursing education, and in addition to theoretical lectures include learning activities such as reflection in small groups, simulation training and taking care of the dead body.

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  • 2.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Kajonius, Petri
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Department of Psychology, Lund University, Lund (SWE).
    An item response theory analysis of the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire Short-Form (TEIQue-SF) in the workplace2022In: Heliyon, E-ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 8, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trait emotional intelligence (EI) predicts important outcomes in the workplace. This study is the first one that reports item and scale functioning in the workplace using item response theory (IRT) analysis of the global 30-item Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire Short-Form (TEIQue-SF). Past IRT research, performed mostly on undergraduate English-speaking students, showed that several items in TEIQue-SF were poorly informative. Data collected in Sweden from 972 employed persons were analyzed. IRT with a graded response model was utilized to analyze items of the global TEIQue-SF scale. As was found in past research, the lowest response category in all items had extreme difficulty threshold parameter values, and only low and moderate levels of latent trait EI were adequately captured, but most items had good values of the discrimination parameters, indicating adequate item informativeness. Four items, which in past research have also shown weak psychometric properties, were poorly informative. To effectively measure trait EI in today’s organizations, there is an advantage in using the most informative items to best represent this construct. 

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    Elsevier OA
  • 3.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Ragnestål-Impola, Carina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Workplace bullies, not their victims, score high on the Dark Triad and Extraversion, and low on Agreeableness and Honesty-Humility2019In: Heliyon, E-ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 5, no 10, article id e02609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most past research has focused mainly on the personality of the victims of bullying and not on the personality of workplace bullies. Some researchers have suggested that bullies and their victims may share bully-typifying personality traits. The aims of this study were to find out what characterizes the personalities of workplace bullies and their victims, and to investigate the relationship between the Dark Triad, HEXACO and workplace bullying. We tested three hypotheses. H1: Machiavellianism and Psychopathy, but not Narcissism, predict the use of bullying tactics (i.e., bullying perpetration). H2: (Low) Honesty-Humility, (low) Agreeableness and (high) Extraversion predict the use of bullying tactics. H3: Honesty-Humility moderates the association between Machiavellianism and the use of bullying tactics. Employees in southwestern Sweden (N = 172; 99 women) across various occupations and organizations were surveyed. Negative Acts Questionnaire-Perpetrators (NAQ-P) and Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised (NAQ-R) were used to assess the use of bullying tactics and victimization. NAQ-P was correlated with NAQ-R (r = .27), indicating some overlap between the use of bullying tactics and victimization. NAQ-P was correlated with Machiavellianism (.60), Psychopathy (.58), Narcissism (.54), Agreeableness (-.34), Honesty-Humility (-.29) and Extraversion (.28). The results of linear regressions confirmed H1, but only partially confirmed H2: Machiavellianism, Psychopathy, (low) Agreeableness and (high) Extraversion explained 32%, 25%, 27% and 19%, respectively, of the variation in the NAQ-P. Replicating past research, NAQ-R was correlated with Neuroticism (.27), Extraversion (-.22), Openness (-.19) and Conscientiousness (-.16). Neuroticism explained 25% and (low) Extraversion 17% of the variation in the NAQ-R. Confirming H3, Honesty-Humility moderated the relationship between the NAQ-P and Machiavellianism. We conclude that bullies, but not their victims, are callous, manipulative, extravert and disagreeable, and that dishonest Machiavellians are the biggest bullies of all. In practice, the victims of workplace bullying need strong and supportive leadership to protect them from bullies with exploitative and manipulative personality profiles.

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  • 4.
    Garcia, Danilo
    et al.
    Blekinge Center of Competence, Blekinge County Council, Karlskrona, Sweden, Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden, Network for Empowerment and Well-Being, Sweden.
    Persson, Björn N.
    University of Turku, Network for Empowerment and Well-Being, Sweden, Department of Psychology, Finland, University of Skövde, Department of Cognitive Neuroscience and Philosophy, Sweden.
    Al Nima, Ali
    Blekinge Center of Competence, Blekinge County Council, Karlskrona, Sweden, Network for Empowerment and Well-Being, Sweden .
    Brulin, Joel Gruneau
    Stockholm University, Department of Psychology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rapp-Ricciardi, Max
    Blekinge Center of Competence, Blekinge County Council, Karlskrona, Sweden, Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden, Network for Empowerment and Well-Being, Sweden.
    Kajonius, Petri
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    IRT analyses of the Swedish Dark Triad Dirty Dozen2018In: Heliyon, E-ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 4, no 3, article id e00569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Dark Triad (i.e., Machiavellianism, narcissism, and psychopathy) can be captured quickly with 12 items using the Dark Triad Dirty Dozen (Jonason and Webster, 2010). Previous Item Response Theory (IRT) analyses of the original English Dark Triad Dirty Dozen have shown that all three subscales adequately tap into the dark domains of personality. The aim of the present study was to analyze the Swedish version of the Dark Triad Dirty Dozen using IRT. Method: 570 individuals (nmales = 326, nfemales = 242, and 2 unreported), including university students and white-collar workers with an age range between 19 and 65 years, responded to the Swedish version of the Dark Triad Dirty Dozen (Garcia et al., 2017a,b). Results: Contrary to previous research, we found that the narcissism scale provided most information, followed by psychopathy, and finally Machiavellianism. Moreover, the psychopathy scale required a higher level of the latent trait for endorsement of its items than the narcissism and Machiavellianism scales. Overall, all items provided reasonable amounts of information and are thus effective for discriminating between individuals. The mean item discriminations (alphas) were 1.92 for Machiavellianism, 2.31 for narcissism, and 1.99 for psychopathy. Conclusion: This is the first study to provide IRT analyses of the Swedish version of the Dark Triad Dirty Dozen. Our findings add to a growing literature on the Dark Triad Dirty Dozen scale in different cultures and highlight psychometric characteristics, which can be used for comparative studies. Items tapping into psychopathy showed higher thresholds for endorsement than the other two scales. Importantly, the narcissism scale seems to provide more information about a lack of narcissism, perhaps mirroring cultural conditions. © 2018 The Authors

  • 5.
    Gellerstedt, Martin
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Babaheidari, Said Morad
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    A first step towards a model for teachers' adoption of ICT pedagogy in schools.2018In: Heliyon, E-ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 4, no 9, article id e00786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is important to identify and understand important factors underpinning the integration of information and communication technology (ICT) in schools. And, it is important that ICT is adopted in a sound pedagogical manner. The aim with this study was to suggest a model for the actual use of ICT in schools and how it may be related to important factors such as technological pedagogical expectations. The design of the model was inspired by TAM2 and UTAUT models, but with some modifications. We have developed a model which highlight the pedagogical aspects beyond the technical ones. Furthermore, our suggested model also include the adoption of digital techniques in everyday life as a potential predictor of adoption of ICT at work. The sample consists of 122 teachers and we analyzed the model with a structural equation model. This study contributes with a suggested model including a new construct for measuring expected performance from a technological pedagogical point of view. This new construct was a significant predictor to actual use of ICT in school. Furthermore we also developed a new construct for adoption of ICT in everyday life, which also was a significant predictor to actual use of ICT in school.

  • 6.
    Lygnegård, Frida
    et al.
    CHILD Research Group, Jönköping University; Swedish Institute of Disability Research, Jönköping University; School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, SWE.
    Granlund, Mats
    CHILD Research Group, Jönköping University; Swedish Institute of Disability Research, Jönköping University; School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, SWE.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University.
    Augustine, Lilly
    CHILD Research Group, Jönköping University; Swedish Institute of Disability Research, Jönköping University; School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, SWE.
    Huus, Karina
    CHILD Research Group, Jönköping University; Swedish Institute of Disability Research, Jönköping University; School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, SWE.
    Short-term longitudinal participation trajectories related to domestic life and peer relations for adolescents with and without self-reported neurodevelopmental impairments2021In: Heliyon, E-ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 7, no 4, article id e06784Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    With maturity and development, complexity in demands and roles change. As participation is often restricted in children with disabilities, this process might be delayed in adolescents. Investigating profiles of participation for adolescents with and without neurodevelopmental impairments could provide an understanding of which factors relate to high level of participation. The aim is to investigate trajectories of participation in everyday activities across clusters based on self-rated participation patterns in frequency of participation and perceived importance of activities related to domestic life and peer-related activities for adolescents with and without self-reported neurodevelopmental impairments.

    Methods and procedures

    A prospective person-based cohort study design.

    Outcomes and results

    Five typical trajectories were identified. Trajectories between clusters with high perceived involvement in peer relations were associated with sibling support and family communication. Self-reported neurodevelopmental impairments did not predict participation profiles at certain time points, nor movements between clusters when measuring self-reported attendance and importance in domestic life and in peer-related activities.

    Conclusion and implications

    Perceived sibling support and family communication are important for predicting typical trajectories across clusters in frequency of attendance and the perceived importance of domestic life and peer relations. Type of impairment was less important in predicting typical trajectories.

  • 7.
    Parikh, V. K.
    et al.
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, Navrachana University, Vadodara, Gujarat (IND).
    Patel, Vivek
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Pandya, D. P.
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, Navrachana University, Vadodara, Gujarat (IND).
    Andersson, Joel
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Current status on manufacturing routes to produce metal matrix composites: State-of-the-art2023In: Heliyon, E-ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 9, no 2, article id e13558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Owing to its excellent properties, Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) has gained popularity and finds application in aerospace, aircraft, shipbuilding, biomedical, biodegradable implant materials and many more. To serve the industrial needs, the manufactured MMC should have homogenous distribution along with minimum agglomeration of reinforcement particles, defect-free microstructure, superior mechanical, tribological and corrosive properties. The techniques implemented to manufacture MMC highly dominate the aforementioned characteristics. According to the physical state of the matrix, the techniques implemented for manufacturing MMC can be classified under two categories i.e. solid state processing and liquid state process. The present article attempts to review the current status of different manufacturing techniques covered under these two categories. The article elaborates on the working principles of state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, the effect of dominating process parameters and the resulting characteristic of composites. Apart from this, the article does provide data regarding the range of dominating process parameters and resulting mechanical properties of different grades of manufactured MMC. Using this data along with the comparative study, various industries and academicians will be able to select the appropriate techniques for manufacturing MMC.

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  • 8.
    von Brömssen, Kerstin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. c VID, Specialized University, Bergen (NOR); UiT, University of Tromsø, Campus Harstad (NOR).
    Werkander Harstäde, C.
    e Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Växjö (SWE).
    Space and place for health and care: Nationalist discourses in Swedish daily press during the first year of COVID-192024In: Heliyon, E-ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 10, no 7, article id e27858Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden’s strategy during COVID-19 with restrictions but no firm closure of the society surprised the rest of the world and was questioned, not least by neighbouring countries. This article analyses public discourses on space and place for health and care in the Swedish daily press during the first year of the pandemic, 2020. Critical discourse analysis was conducted on daily press newspaper articles to approach issues of space, place, health and care during the COVID-10 pandemic.

    The findings suggest three main discourses. First, a powerful discourse on unity against the threat is articulated, urging citizens in Sweden to be loyal in the national space. Secondly, an affirming national reconstructing discourse is manifested, related to constructions of borders of national space but also in relation to places of family life and social contacts to ‘flatten the curve’ and stay healthy. Thirdly, later in the period the overarching discourse of the nation and its loyal citizens was torn apart and increasing tensions were articulated due to, as it appeared, the uncertain actions from the government.

    This study adds to the literature on a theoretical and practical level. Raising awareness on nationalist discourses in relation to place, space, health, and care could prove important in combating inequalities in the local society as well as when cooperating on an international level.

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    Förlagets fulltext
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