Change search
Refine search result
1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Jenny
    et al.
    Region Västra Götaland, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Medicine Geriatrics and Emergency Medicine/Östra, Gothenburg (SWE): Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Rejnö, Åsa
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. Stroke unit, Department of Medicine, Skaraborg Hospital Skövde (SWE).
    Jakobsson, Sofie
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE); Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Hanson, Per-Olof
    Region Västra Götaland, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Medicine Geriatrics and Emergency Medicine/Östra, Gothenburg (SWE), Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Nielsen, Susanne
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (SWE), Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Björck, Lena
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE), Region Västra Götaland, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Medicine Geriatrics and Emergency Medicine/Östra, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Patient´s description of onset stroke symptoms: Oral Presentations. ESOC 2023 Abstract Book2023In: European Stroke Journal, ISSN 2396-9873, E-ISSN 2396-9881, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 427-427, article id 725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: Stroke symptoms vary and could be hard to recognize. In addition, stroke severity has decreased according to the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NISSH), with less pronounced symptoms expression. Knowledge on the patient’s description of stroke symptoms is therefore needed. The aim was to describe patient’s symptoms at stroke onset.

    Methods: A qualitative content analysis was used. Data were collected through individual interviews with 27 patients (16 men and 11 women, median age 70.4 years). All patients were hospitalized with a first-time stroke. The interviews were conducted within 4 weeks of symptoms onset and before hospital discharge.

    Results: All patients had symptoms that affected their daily life. Some patients described having multiple symptoms at the same time, others had symptoms that began insidiously and worsened over time. Symptoms such as overwhelming fatigue or nausea were described as Premonition of becoming ill, feeling unwell or that something was wrong. Motoric bodily changes were multifaceted as slurred speech or dizziness, balance difficulties and losing control of the body or motor dysfunction. But also, that the surroundings were distorted, and solid objects moved around. Symptoms of Dazed and affected senses included confusion and visual impairment or headache.

    Conclusions: Stroke is a complex disease with several different symptoms’ expressions and could be difficult to recognize, especially when symptoms are less typical or perceived as not serious. Increased awareness of stroke symptoms among caregivers and among members of the community is important and needed.

  • 2.
    Rejnö, Åsa
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. Stroke unit, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Berg, Linda
    University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Creating dignified encounters in unexpected sudden death by stroke: communication as the key2018In: European Stroke Journal, ISSN 2396-9873, E-ISSN 2396-9881, Vol. 3, no 1_suppl., p. -292, article id AS13-002Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims: Communication is present in all encounters in stroke care and of importance to create a caring relation. A good relation between patients, next of kin and health care staff is crucial, not least in unexpected sudden death by stroke. The aim of the study was to illuminate communication and its meaning in unexpected sudden death by stroke, as experienced by next of kin and stroke team members. Method: The design is a secondary analysis of qualitative data from a project on unexpected sudden death by stroke. Material from four interview studies from the project with all in all twelve next of kin of patients who had died due to the acute stroke during hospital stay and twentyseven stroke team members from stroke units were utilized. Data were analysed with qualitative content analysis. Results: The analysis reveals communication as the foundation for care and caring in acute stroke care. The overarching theme foundation for dignified encounters in care is built up by six themes illuminating the meaning of communication in unexpected sudden death by stroke. Conclusion: Communication and its meaning in unexpected sudden death by stroke as experienced by next of kin and stroke team members is one key to create dignified encounters in care when unexpected sudden death by stroke occurs. It gives ground for unanimity about care and possibility to maintain and uphold dignity in care when acknowledging the next of kin familiarity with the patient, giving ground for a person centeredness despite the patients sever illness.

1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf