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  • 1.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    et al.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham (USA).
    Zietz, Susannah
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham (USA).
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Department of Special Education, Hashemite University, Zarqa (JOR).
    Bacchini, Dario
    Department of Humanistic Studies, University of Naples “Federico II”,Naples (ITA).
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda (USA);UNICEF, New York (USA); Institute for Fiscal Studies, London (GBR) .
    Chang, Lei
    Department of Psychology, University of Macau, Macau (CHN).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst (USA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Department of Psychology, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Rome (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Liu, Qin
    Maternal and Child Health, School of Public Health and Management, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (USA).
    Long, Qian
    Global Health Research Center, Duke Kunshan University, Kunshan (CHN).
    Oburu, Paul
    Department of Psychology, Maseno University, Maseno (KEN).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Department of Psychology, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Rome (ITA).
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham (USA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Peace Culture Foundation, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Department of Psychology, Temple University, Philadelphia (USA);Department of Psychology, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (SAU) .
    Tirado, Liliana Mariana Uribe
    Department of Psychology, Universidad de San Buenaventura, Medellín (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Department of Psychology, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Department of Psychology, Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City (PHL).
    Culture and social change in mothers' and fathers' individualism, collectivism and parenting attitudes2021In: Social Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-0760, Vol. 10, no 12, article id 459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cultures and families are not static over time but evolve in response to social transformations, such as changing gender roles, urbanization, globalization, and technology uptake. Historically, individualism and collectivism have been widely used heuristics guiding cross-cultural comparisons, yet these orientations may evolve over time, and individuals within cultures and cultures themselves can have both individualist and collectivist orientations. Historical shifts in parents' attitudes also have occurred within families in several cultures. As a way of understanding mothers' and fathers' individualism, collectivism, and parenting attitudes at this point in history, we examined parents in nine countries that varied widely in country-level individualism rankings. Data included mothers' and fathers' reports (N = 1338 families) at three time points in China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States. More variance was accounted for by within-culture than between-culture factors for parents' individualism, collectivism, progressive parenting attitudes, and authoritarian parenting attitudes, which were predicted by a range of sociodemographic factors that were largely similar for mothers and fathers and across cultural groups. Social changes from the 20th to the 21st century may have contributed to some of the similarities between mothers and fathers and across the nine countries.

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    MDPI
  • 2.
    Ljung, Margareta
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Oudhuis, Margareta
    Safety on passenger ferries from catering staff’s perspective2016In: Social Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-0760, Vol. 5, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The majority of employees on passenger ferries consist of the catering staff: those who operate in restaurants, shops, and in the hotel on board. Research on this category is scant. The aim of this study is to investigate the catering staff’s experiences and perceptions of safety practice on board passenger ferries. The methods are semi-structured interviews and a qualitative content analysis of official documents and research articles. Results: Increased safety regulations and directives on an international and a national level have taken place after the major ferry disasters of late 1990s. Changes in the safety organization on the passenger ferries have resulted in more involvement of the catering crew in safety on board. Safety awareness and the way the catering staff think about safety have improved. The risk of terrorism has further reinforced safety awareness. A clear challenge for safety work on ferries is the reduction of catering crew. The transition to job flexibility for catering crew may constitute risk factors regarding safety and security. © 2016 by the author.

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    fulltext
  • 3.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    et al.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham (USA).
    Çiftçi, Leyla
    Institute for Psychotherapy, Medical School Berlin (DEU).
    Jones, Sierra
    Department of Psychology, Duke University, Durham (USA).
    Klotz, Eva
    Clinical Psychology, Utrecht University (NLD).
    Ondrušková, Tamara
    Division of Psychiatry, University College London (GBR).
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham (USA).
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Department of Psychology, Ateneo de Manila University (PHL).
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Department of Special Education, Hashemite University, Zarqa (JOR).
    Bacchini, Dario
    Department of Humanistic Studies, University of Naples “Federico II” (ITA).
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda; 0 UNICEF, New York (USA); Institute for Fiscal Studies, London (GBR).
    Chang, Lei
    Department of Psychology, University of Macau (CHN).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst (USA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Department of Psychology, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Rome (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Liu, Qin
    Maternal and Child Health, School of Public Health and Management, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (CHN).
    Long, Qian
    Global Health Research Center, Duke Kunshan University, Kunshan (CHN).
    Oburu, Paul
    Department of Psychology, Maseno University, Maseno (KEN).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Department of Psychology, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Rome (ITA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Peace Culture Foundation, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia (USA); King Abdulaziz University (SAU).
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Consultorio Psicológico Popular, Medellín, Colombia .
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Chiang Mai University, Suthep, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Adolescent Positivity and Future Orientation, Parental Psychological Control, and Young Adult Internalising Behaviours during COVID-19 in Nine Countries2022In: Social Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-0760, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 75-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted many young adults’ lives educationally, economically, and personally. This study investigated associations between COVID-19-related disruption and perception of increases in internalising symptoms among young adults and whether these associations were moderated by earlier measures of adolescent positivity and future orientation and parental psychological control. Participants included 1329 adolescents at Time 1, and 810 of those participants as young adults (M age = 20, 50.4% female) at Time 2 from 9 countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States). Drawing from a larger longitudinal study of adolescent risk taking and young adult competence, this study controlled for earlier levels of internalising symptoms during adolescence in examining these associations. Higher levels of adolescent positivity and future orientation as well as parent psychological control during late adolescence helped protect young adults from sharper perceived increases in anxiety and depression during the first nine months of widespread pandemic lockdowns in all nine countries. Findings are discussed in terms of how families in the 21st century can foster greater resilience during and after adolescence when faced with community-wide stressors, and the results provide new information about how psychological control may play a protective role during times of significant community-wide threats to personal health and welfare.

1 - 3 of 3
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
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