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  • 1.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Lindström, Berner
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Making collaboration work: Developing boundary work and boundary awareness in emergency exercises2017In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 286-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaboration in emergency work is challenging on many levels. The unforeseen and temporary nature of incidents presents basic challenges. Another important challenge is boundaries between specialized and autonomous emergency service organizations. We need to know more about how exercises are performed to increase the individuals and organizations preparedness for future joint response work. The aim of this study was to explore how boundary work is carried out at the incident site during exercises, and how boundary awareness is developed based on this boundary work. The analytic focus was on how boundaries were identified, negotiated and managed in the participants work. Empirically, full-scale exercises involving police, ambulance and rescue services and with repetition of practical scenarios and joint-reflection seminars are studied. Much of the work in the exercises was performed within distinct areas of expertise, in accordance with concrete routines, skills and responsibilities. Boundary work was often organized in the form of distribution of labour or creating chains of actions. The exercises shed light on challenges related to other aspects of emergency response,such as a lack of resources, diverging primary responsibilities, time-criticality and hazardous environments. The design allowed participants to explicate boundaries, test and discuss alternative solutions, and to visualize the effects of different solutions as the scenarios were repeated. The boundaries that were identified were often of institutional character, and were also related to the specific scenarios and to the actions taken in the activities. By integrating real-life experiences of collaborative work in the exercise, the exercise gained a certain meaning that was essential for the participants to develop boundary awareness.

  • 2.
    Arghavan Shahlaei, Charlotte
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Conceptualizing industrial workplace learning: an information systems perspective2022In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 35, no 9, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify the constituent parts of learning in the manufacturing work context and understand why these parts are key in the learning of the employees. Design/methodology/approach: The data was collected from two sources: a literature review of the Information Systems literature to establish an initial picture of what learning in relation to digital technologies entails and in-depth interviews with engineers in the automotive industry whose knowledge-intensive work is exposed to substantial digital transformation. Findings: The authors first identified three constituent parts for learning: change, reflection and deliberation. When the authors cross-checked the initial findings through in-depth interviews with the engineers, it was found that these three themes trigger learning through three different mechanisms, that is, balancing newness, finding point of reference and organizing actively. Thus, the findings of this paper extend beyond a categorical identification of what constitutes learning to also illustrate why learning entails these constituent parts. Research limitations/implications: This paper implies that progressive learning requires active organizing of learning stages. The data is limited to the review of the Information Systems field. The authors have also only focused on the automotive industry as the representative sector in the manufacturing industry. Practical implications: Applying the model of progressive learning can be a primary way to actively plan and organize learning opportunities for employees. This is key for supporting learning culture in organizations that are exposed to continuous and disruptive changes. Social implications: A significant part of social sustainability is based on sustainable employability and feelings of contentment at work. This paper is an attempt to highlight how sustainable employability can be achieved by providing effective learning opportunities at work. Originality/value: The originality of this paper emerges from two sources. First, the authors conducted the literature review and in-depth interviews by devising innovative methods because of the challenges of identifying when (informal) learning has occurred at work. Second, the authors owe the in-depth interviews to the first author’s extensive familiarity with the automotive industry and the knowledge and rapport acquired through her prior longitudinal research on the engineers’ work. It was this background that allowed the authors to find out when these engineers were about to leave the firm because of discontent about their competence development. 

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  • 3.
    Bernhard, Irene
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Olsson, Anna Karin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    One foot in academia and one in work-life: the case of Swedish industrial PhD students2023In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 506-523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this study is to explore the benefits and barriers for learning in industrial PhD education through the perspectives of industrial PhD students. A work-integrated learning (WIL) approach is applied to highlight key issues that university and industry need to consider promoting mutual learning.

    Design/methodology/approach – The empirical context is a Swedish university profiling WIL offering PhD programs in three disciplines for industrial PhD students from both the private and public sectors. Data was gathered using qualitative methods; 19 semistructured interviews with industrial PhD students.

    Findings – Findings show that industrial PhD students are developing practical and transferable skills, hence, contributing to research of interest for academia and work–life. Identified benefits for learning include proximity and access to data, project and networks and contextual understanding and tacit knowledge. Barriers for learning are the perceived limited understanding of employers, the dilemma of balancing and switching between different roles, lack of belonging and identity, deficient collaboration agreements and ethical dilemmas.

    Research limitations/implications – Contributes insights into an industrial PhD education transforming along with societal needs promoting a future workforce of researchers with skills, new work practices and learning capabilities applicable in the work–life of contemporary society.

    Originality/value – This study contributes to the emerging field of studies of alternative doctoral educations by identifying benefits and barriers for learning and providing recommendations for how university and industry may promote learning in a resilient industrial PhD education collaboration.

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  • 4.
    Carlsson, Sandra
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Willermark, Sara
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Forbidden and necessary: making sense of smartphones in vocational teaching2023In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 239-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The digitalization of schools has intensified in recent years. It is reflected in policy documents as well as in extensive investments in digital technology and professional development initiatives to promote digitalization. At the same time, attempts are being made to “tame” the same digitization sometimes by regulations banning smartphones in class. This study aims to examine how smartphones are interpreted by vocational teachers in Sweden using the theoretical lens of technological frames.

    Design/methodology/approach – The data consist of ten semi-structured interviews with vocational teachers, representing eight vocational programs in Sweden.

    Findings – The results show breadth in how teachers understand, interpret and relate to the smartphone in vocational education. The authors show how the smartphone often forms an integral part of professional work and is thus difficult to separate from vocational teaching and nurturing vocational competencies.

    Originality/value – The authors’ contributions include using technological frames to explore how smartphones are interpreted and understood by vocational teachers by demonstrating how they relate to the nature of the smartphone, the strategy for the smartphone and the smartphone in use. The theoretical framework is used to interpret restrictions on technology use, in this case a smartphone, in education. The results could be of interest to researchers as well as to teachers, school leaders and policymakers.

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  • 5.
    Cerna, Katarina
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Education, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Weilenmann, Alexandra
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Education, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Jonas
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Education, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rysedt, Hans
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Education, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Islind, Anna Sigridur
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lundin, Johan
    University of Gothenberg, Department of Applied IT, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nurses' work practices in design: managing the complexity of pain2020In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 135-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to understand the activities in nurses' work practices in relation to the design process of a self-monitoring application. Design/methodology/approach: A design ethnographic approach was applied in this study. Findings: To solve the problem of translating highly qualitative phenomena, such as pain, into the particular abstract features of a self-monitoring application, design participants had to balance these two aspects by managing complexity. In turn, the nurses'€™ work practices have changed because it now involves a new activity based on a different logic than the nurses’ traditional work practices. Originality/value: This study describes a new activity included in nurses’ work practices when the nurses became part of a design process. This study introduces a novel way on how to gain a deeper understanding of existing professional practice through a detailed study of activities taking place in a design process. This study explores the possible implications for nurses’ professional practices when they participate in a self-monitoring application design process. Â2020, Emerald Publishing Limited.

  • 6.
    Haj-Bolouri, Amir
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Master Östlund, Christian
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Rossi, Matti
    Aalto University, Helsinki (FIN).
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Action design research as a means for organizing workplace learning: case studies of e-learning platforms2021In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 405-425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Although there is a large body of literature available on the foundations of workplace learning (WPL), little is known about designated research methods that systematically combine intervention, design and learning at work. The purpose of this study is to propose action design research as an alternative method for organizing WPL in general and facilitating pedagogically rich activities in particular.

    Design/methodology/approach

    This research used a case study approach to focus the action design research method and exemplify its utility through two case studies that emphasize WPL in general and how the method can be used to facilitate pedagogically rich activities in particular.

    Findings

    The results of the case studies indicate that the action design research method had a significantly positive effect on organizing WPL in organizations systematically, as well as creating a narrative that structures the research process and its outcomes.

    Originality/value

    The findings help scholars that are in need of organizing WPL research in a systematic way. The findings do also help practitioners in organizations to solve real-world problems and develop new knowledge jointly together with scholars. Consequently, the findings contribute to the existing literature by exemplifying how to facilitate pedagogically rich activities and disseminate the outcomes of doing so in a formalized way.

  • 7.
    Högberg, Karin
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Real Estate, Economics and Society.
    Willermark, Sara
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    “Am I supposed to call them?”: Relearning interactions in the digital workplace2023In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 36, no 9, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This study aims to develop the understanding of learning processes related to the new ways of interacting in the enforced digital workplace over time.

    Design/methodology/approach – A multiple, longitudinal case study of knowledge-based workers in three firms located in Sweden has been conducted from March 2020 to March 2023. In total, 89 interviews with 32 employees in three knowledge-based firms have been collected.

    Findings – The study shows how the intricate interaction between rules and norms for interaction and work must be renegotiated as well as un- and relearned when the physical work environment no longer frames the work context. Furthermore, technology can be viewed as both an enable and a barrier, that is, technology has enhanced collaboration between organizational members yet also created social difficulties, for example, related to communication and interaction. The study emphasizes that individuals learned through trial and error. That is, they tried behaviors such as translating social interactions" to a digital arena, appraised the outcomes and modified the practices if the outcomes were poor.

    Research limitations/implications – The present study does have several limitations. First, it is based on interviews with respondents within three organizations in Sweden. To broaden and deepen the understanding of both organizational and learning, future studies can contribute by studying other contexts as well as using a mixed method approach in other countries.

    Practical implications – Results from the study can provide a practical understanding of how the rapid change from working at the office to working from home using digital technologies can be understood and managed.

    Originality/value – Contributions include combining interaction order and un- and relearning among organizational employees. This insight is important given that the rapid digital transformation of our society has changed how work is performed and how the future workplace will be both structured and organized.

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  • 8.
    Islind, Anna Sigridur
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Learning in home care: a digital artifact as a designated boundary object-in-use2017In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 29, no 7-8, p. 577-587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to understand how the role of an mHealth artifact plays out in home care settings. An mHealth artifact, in terms of a mobile app, was tested to see how the quality of home care work practice was enhanced and changed. The research question is: In what ways does an mHealth artifact re-shape a home care practice and how does this affect the interaction between caregivers and the elderly and learning opportunities for the caregivers? Design/methodology/approach: An action research approach was taken and the study was conducted in a home care organization in a Swedish municipality. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews and observations that were conducted during home visits. Concepts of learning and boundary objects were used to analyze and distinguish interactions and conversations with the mHealth artifact. Findings: The study shows how an mHealth artifact is re-shaping a home care practice and how this affects interactions and identifies learning opportunities. Views on the mHealth artifact as a designated boundary object as well as a boundary object-in-use must co-exist. Originality/value: The study provides qualitative descriptions from using an mHealth artifact for home care, which is an emerging area of concern for both research and practice. It focuses on the interactional and organizational values generated from the actual use of the designed mobile application. © 2017, © Emerald Publishing Limited.

  • 9.
    Islind, Anna Sigridur
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Learning in home care: a digital artifact as a designated boundary object-in-use2017In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 29, no 7/8, p. 577-587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeThe aim of this paper is to understand how the role of an mHealth artifact plays out in home care settings. An mHealth artifact, in terms of a mobile app, was tested to see how the quality of home care work practice was enhanced and changed. The research question is: In what ways does an mHealth artifact re-shape a home care practice and how does this affect the interaction between caregivers and the elderly and learning opportunities for the caregivers?Design/methodology/approachAn action research approach was taken and the study was conducted in a home care organization in a Swedish municipality. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews and observations that were conducted during home visits. Concepts of learning and boundary objects were used to analyze and distinguish interactions and conversations with the mHealth artifact.FindingsThe study shows how an mHealth artifact is re-shaping a home care practice and how this affects interactions and identifies learning opportunities. Views on the mHealth artifact as a designated boundary object as well as a boundary object-in-use must co-exist.Originality/valueThe study provides qualitative descriptions from using an mHealth artifact for home care, which is an emerging area of concern for both research and practice. It focuses on the interactional and organizational values generated from the actual use of the designed mobile application

  • 10.
    Johansson Bunting, Leona
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages. Göteborgs universitet.
    Herrman, Margaretha
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture.
    Johanson, Marita
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture. University West, Administration .
    Learning film production2014In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 296-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this study is to contribute knowledge about learning linked to the film industry by investigating how film producers reason about learning for and in the profession. 

    Design/methodology/approach – This study is based on semi-structured interviews with twenty film producers, both university and workplace trained (UWT) and workplace trained (WT). The content analysis is based on the transcribed dialogues. The study is empirical, explorative and qualitative.

    Findings – The interviewees consider networks to be of utmost importance for gaining entrance to and continuously finding work in the film industry. They also reason about required knowing and what learning practices are available. Although formal education is not advocated by all, it can hold intrinsic value for the individual. Traditions of learning are being scrutinized and critical reflection is replacing naivety and emotionality.

    Practical implications – Different aims regarding learning in the formal education system and film industry result in a gap which needs to be bridged in order to challenge conserving and reproducing patterns of learning. Collaboration is suggested as a solution benefiting both the individual learner and the film industry. The resulting knowledge from this study can be used by the formal education system and the film industry when developing forms for collaboration surrounding learners of film production. 

    Originality/value – The focus presented in this paper of learning in and for film production has been sparingly addressed in previous research.

  • 11.
    Samuelson, Sarah
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics. Research, Education, Development and Innovation, Primary Health Care, Region Västra Götaland, Vänersborg (SWE).
    Svensson, Ann
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Svenningsson, Irene
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE); Research, Education, Development and Innovation, Primary Health Care, Region Västra Götaland, Vänersborg (SWE).
    Pennbrant, Sandra
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Learning in living lab collaboration in primary care: a qualitative study2023In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 35, no 9, p. 218-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    To meet future healthcare needs, primary care is undergoing a transformation in which innovations and new ways of working play an important role. However, successful innovations depend on joint learning and rewarding collaborations between healthcare and other stakeholders. This study aims to explore how learning develops when entrepreneurs, healthcare professionals and older people collaborate in a primary care living lab.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The study had an action research design and was conducted at a clinically embedded living lab at a primary care centre on the west coast of Sweden. Data consisted of e-mail conversations, recordings from design meetings and three group interviews with each party (entrepreneurs, healthcare professionals and older people). Data were analysed with inductive qualitative content analysis.

    Findings

    An overarching theme, “To share each other’s worlds in an arranged space for learning”, was found, followed by three categories, “Prerequisites for learning”, “Strategies to achieve learning” and “To learn from and with each other”. These three categories comprise eight subcategories.

    Originality/value

    This research contributes to knowledge regarding the need for arranged spaces for learning and innovation in primary care and how collaborative learning can contribute to the development of practice.

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  • 12.
    Spante, Maria
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Varga, Anita
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Carlsson, Linnea
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Triggering sustainable professional agency: using change laboratory to tackle unequal access to educational success collectively2021In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 162-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose This study aims to depict how a change laboratory (CL) promotes sustainable professional practice at the workplace to tackle unequal access to educational success.

    Design/methodology/approach The empirical findings are from a CL focusing on school professionals’ agency and a follow-up study one year after the CL.

    Findings The study shows how the staff gained insight that professional agency is a collective and relational practice. Furthermore, the staff explored how to make a difference with viable means to create new workplace models for students’ success despite experiencing a conundrum.

    Research limitations/implications This study examined participants’ perspectives in workplace change and provided support for further research examining how professionally and collectively designed models gain sustainability in schools.

    Practical implications This study provides empirical data of how professional agency for change driven by collective visions can be accelerated with the interventionist method CL among school professionals.

    Social implications This study emphasizes the value of professional collective learning at the workplace, driven by several professional groups in school, and the need to follow up to detect sustainable change.

    Originality/value This study emphasizes the value of professional collective learning at the workplace, driven by several professional groups in school, and the need to follow up to detect sustainable change.

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  • 13.
    Sunnemark, Fredrik
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Urban Planing and Development.
    Gahnström, Emil
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Urban Planing and Development.
    Rudström, Hedvig
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Urban Planing and Development.
    Karlsson, Erika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Urban Planing and Development.
    Assmo, Per
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Urban Planing and Development. Political Studies Department, Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Bellville (ZAF).
    Social sustainability for whom?: Developing an analytical approach through a tripartite collaboration2023In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 524-539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Social sustainability is a concept frequently referred to in public debates concerning how to construct the governance of future societies. The interpretations of its meaning, however, are ambiguous, and practices often dubious. Confronting top-down technocratic governance structures, this paper aims to argue for for tripartite collaborations between residents, higher education institutions (HEIs) and local government, as an approach toward social sustainability that involves residents’ interests in local governance. Design/methodology/approach: This study argues that a specific time-spatial method of analysis can benefit the co-creation of knowledge as it passes through the spectrum of resident–HEI–local government. It provides a way for resident perceptions to become structured knowledge that originates from the residents, effectively engendering a bottom-up governance structure. Findings: This study shows how to include residents in policymaking and implementation processes as co-creators of knowledge, and thereby displays the possibility of examining knowledge and competence within municipal projects for social sustainability. Originality/value: The model developed in this study can be used as a methodological instrument to analyze and expand resident participation in local social sustainability work. It thereby provides a toolbox for inclusive policymaking and strategies. © 2023, Fredrik Sunnemark, Emil Gahnström, Hedvig Rudström, Erika Karlsson and Per Assmo.

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  • 14.
    Svensson, Ann
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Gustavsson, Linn
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Urban Planing and Development.
    Svenningsson, Irene
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE); Department of Primary Health Care, Region Västra Götaland, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Karlsson, Christina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Karlsson, Tina
    Primary Health Care, Färgelanda (SWE).
    Healthcare professionals learning when implementing a digital artefact identifying patients’ cognitive impairment2023In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 490-505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeThis paper presents findings from a qualitative study of healthcare professionals’ practice, where learning is taking place when a digital artefact is implemented for identification of patients’ cognitive impairment. The use of digital artefacts is increasing in various workplaces, to include professionals in healthcare. This paper aims to explore the following research question: How is the professional learning unfolding in patient-based work when a digital artefact transforms the practice?

    Design/methodology/approachVarious data collection methods are used for this study, consisting of dialogue meetings, interviews and a reference-group meeting. Thematic analysis is used to inductively bring forth the themes of the collected data.

    FindingsProfessionals’ knowledge and experience are of vital importance in learning and changing work practices. Together with their ability to reflect on changes, their knowledge and experience constitute the prefiguration when the introduction of a digital application brings about indeterminacy in the work practice.Originality/valueThis paper makes a contribution to practice-based research as it consolidates previous research and identifies professionals knowledge and learning in a healthcare context. This can be used to further explore and advance the field, as well as to establish the evidence-based importance of transforming practices based on implementation of digital artefacts.

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  • 15.
    Svensson, Ann
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Guest editorial: Learning capabilities for future work practices2023In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 465-469Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Svensson, Ann
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Bernhard, Iréne
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Guest editorial: Learning capabilities for future work practices: part two2023In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 35, no 8, p. 665-669Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Willermark, Sara
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Islind, Anna Sigridur
    Reykjavik University, Reykjavik (ISL).
    Adopting to the virtual workplace: identifying leadership affordances in virtual schools2023In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, no 9, p. 22-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This study aims to explore virtual leadership work within educational settings in the light of social disruption. In 2020, a global pandemic changed the way we work. For school leaders, that involved running a virtual school overnight. Although there is a stream of research that explores leadership in solely virtual communities, there is a gap in the literature regarding practices that transition from analog to virtual practices and the changes in leadership in those types of work practices.

    Design/methodology/approach – The data gathering method constitutes a questionnaire to explore school leaders’ experiences of virtual work and virtual leadership in light of social disruption. One hundred and five Swedish school leaders answered the questionnaire covering both fixed and open questions.

    Findings – The results show that school leaders’ general experiences of transition to virtual school have worked relatively well. We show how the work changes and shift the focus in the virtual workplace.

    Originality/value – The author’s contributions include theorizing about leadership affordances in virtual schools and providing implications for practice. The authors summarize our main contribution in five affordances that characterize virtual leadership, including a focus on core activities, trust-based government, 1:1 communication with staff, structure and clarity and active outreach activities. The results could be interesting for understanding the radical digitalization of leadership in the digital workplace.

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