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  • 1.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Lindström, Berner
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Making collaboration work: Developing boundary work and boundary awareness in emergency exercises2017In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 286-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaboration in emergency work is challenging on many levels. The unforeseen and temporary nature of incidents presents basic challenges. Another important challenge is boundaries between specialized and autonomous emergency service organizations. We need to know more about how exercises are performed to increase the individuals and organizations preparedness for future joint response work. The aim of this study was to explore how boundary work is carried out at the incident site during exercises, and how boundary awareness is developed based on this boundary work. The analytic focus was on how boundaries were identified, negotiated and managed in the participants work. Empirically, full-scale exercises involving police, ambulance and rescue services and with repetition of practical scenarios and joint-reflection seminars are studied. Much of the work in the exercises was performed within distinct areas of expertise, in accordance with concrete routines, skills and responsibilities. Boundary work was often organized in the form of distribution of labour or creating chains of actions. The exercises shed light on challenges related to other aspects of emergency response,such as a lack of resources, diverging primary responsibilities, time-criticality and hazardous environments. The design allowed participants to explicate boundaries, test and discuss alternative solutions, and to visualize the effects of different solutions as the scenarios were repeated. The boundaries that were identified were often of institutional character, and were also related to the specific scenarios and to the actions taken in the activities. By integrating real-life experiences of collaborative work in the exercise, the exercise gained a certain meaning that was essential for the participants to develop boundary awareness.

  • 2.
    Islind, Anna Sigridur
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Learning in home care: a digital artifact as a designated boundary object-in-use2017In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 29, no 7-8, p. 577-587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to understand how the role of an mHealth artifact plays out in home care settings. An mHealth artifact, in terms of a mobile app, was tested to see how the quality of home care work practice was enhanced and changed. The research question is: In what ways does an mHealth artifact re-shape a home care practice and how does this affect the interaction between caregivers and the elderly and learning opportunities for the caregivers? Design/methodology/approach: An action research approach was taken and the study was conducted in a home care organization in a Swedish municipality. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews and observations that were conducted during home visits. Concepts of learning and boundary objects were used to analyze and distinguish interactions and conversations with the mHealth artifact. Findings: The study shows how an mHealth artifact is re-shaping a home care practice and how this affects interactions and identifies learning opportunities. Views on the mHealth artifact as a designated boundary object as well as a boundary object-in-use must co-exist. Originality/value: The study provides qualitative descriptions from using an mHealth artifact for home care, which is an emerging area of concern for both research and practice. It focuses on the interactional and organizational values generated from the actual use of the designed mobile application. © 2017, © Emerald Publishing Limited.

  • 3.
    Johansson Bunting, Leona
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages. Göteborgs universitet.
    Herrman, Margaretha
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture.
    Johanson, Marita
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture.
    Learning film production2014In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 296-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this study is to contribute knowledge about learning linked to the film industry by investigating how film producers reason about learning for and in the profession. 

    Design/methodology/approach – This study is based on semi-structured interviews with twenty film producers, both university and workplace trained (UWT) and workplace trained (WT). The content analysis is based on the transcribed dialogues. The study is empirical, explorative and qualitative.

    Findings – The interviewees consider networks to be of utmost importance for gaining entrance to and continuously finding work in the film industry. They also reason about required knowing and what learning practices are available. Although formal education is not advocated by all, it can hold intrinsic value for the individual. Traditions of learning are being scrutinized and critical reflection is replacing naivety and emotionality.

    Practical implications – Different aims regarding learning in the formal education system and film industry result in a gap which needs to be bridged in order to challenge conserving and reproducing patterns of learning. Collaboration is suggested as a solution benefiting both the individual learner and the film industry. The resulting knowledge from this study can be used by the formal education system and the film industry when developing forms for collaboration surrounding learners of film production. 

    Originality/value – The focus presented in this paper of learning in and for film production has been sparingly addressed in previous research.

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