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  • 1.
    Isaksson, Charlotta
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Learning for lower energy consumption2014In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 12-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy-efficient technologies are not just objects that might enable households to carry out more sustainable practices; they are tools, and using them effectively requires certain skills and knowledge. Households' difficulties in handling home heating and hot water technologies in particular have been highlighted as an obstacle to meeting energy conservation objectives. This has given rise to calls for improved support based on how the households define their activities and handle these technologies. By deploying a socio-cultural theory of learning and using in-depth interviews with households that have recently purchased renewable heating systems, this paper examines various situations in which people have learnt to use the technologies, and it discusses lessons learnt that may be useful for developing support. The results demonstrate three common learning approaches and identify situations where the learning process runs smoothly and where it does not. The conclusions suggest strategies for helping households overcome the resistance embedded in the interaction with the technologies, and they highlight the importance, when developing support, of starting with what creates meaning in various situations.

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