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  • 1.
    Bolelli, G.
    et al.
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria 'Enzo Ferrari', Via P. Vivarelli 10/1, Modena, MO, Italy .
    Berger, L.-M.
    Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik (IWS), Winterbergstr. 28, Dresden, Germany.
    Börner, T.
    Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik (IWS), Winterbergstr. 28, Dresden, Germany.
    Koivuluoto, H.
    Tampere University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, Korkeakoulunkatu 6, Tampere, Finland .
    Matikainen, V.
    Tampere University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, Korkeakoulunkatu 6, Tampere, Finland .
    Lusvarghi, L.
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria 'Enzo Ferrari', Via P. Vivarelli 10/1, Modena, MO, Italy .
    Lyphout, Christophe
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Sassatelli, P.
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria 'Enzo Ferrari', Via P. Vivarelli 10/1, Modena, MO, Italy .
    Trache, R.
    Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik (IWS), Winterbergstr. 28, Dresden, Germany .
    Vuoristo, P.c
    Tampere University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, Korkeakoulunkatu 6, Tampere, Finlan.
    Sliding and abrasive wear behaviour of HVOF- and HVAF-sprayed Cr3C2-NiCr hardmetal coatings2016In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 358-359, p. 32-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides a comprehensive characterisation of HVOF- and HVAF-sprayed Cr3C2–25 wt.% NiCr hardmetal coatings. One commercial powder composition with two different particle size distributions was processed using five HVOF and HVAF thermal spray systems.All coatings contain less Cr3C2 than the feedstock powder, possibly due to the rebound of some Cr3C2-rich particles during high-velocity impact onto the substrate.Dry sand-rubber wheel abrasive wear testing causes both grooving and pull-out of splat fragments. Mass losses depend on inter- and intra-lamellar cohesion, being higher (≥70 mg after a wear distance of 5904 m) for the coatings deposited with the coarser feedstock powder or with one type of HVAF torch.Sliding wear at room temperature against alumina involves shallower abrasive grooving, small-scale delamination and carbide pull-outs, and it is controlled by intra-lamellar cohesion. The coatings obtained from the fine feedstock powder exhibit the lowest wear rates (≈5x10−6 mm3/(Nm)). At 400 °C, abrasive grooving dominates the sliding wear behaviour; wear rates increase by one order of magnitude but friction coefficients decrease from ≈0.7 to ≈0.5. The thermal expansion coefficient of the coatings (11.08x10−6 °C−1 in the 30–400 °C range) is sufficiently close to that of the steel substrate (14.23x10−6 °C−1) to avoid macro-cracking

  • 2.
    Tamil Alagan, Nageswaran
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Hoier, Philipp
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Industrial and Materials Science, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Zeman, Pavel
    Department of Production Machines and Equipment, Faculty of Mechanica lEngineering, Center of Advanced AerospaceTechnology, CzechTechnical University in Prague, Czech Republic.
    Klement, Uta
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Industrial and Materials Science, Gothenburg, Swede.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Wretland, Anders
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB,Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Effects of high pressure cooling in the flank and rake faces of WC tool on the tool wear mechanism and process conditions in turning of alloy 7182019In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 434-435, article id 102922Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The exceptional properties of Heat Resistant Super Alloys (HRSA) justify the search for advanced technologiesthat can improve the capability of machining these materials. One such advanced technology is the applicationof a coolant at high pressure while machining, a strategic solution known for at least six decades. The aim is toachieve extended tool life, better chip control and improved surface finish. Another aim is to control the temperature in the workpiece/tool interface targeting for optimum cutting conditions. In most of the existing applications with high-pressure coolant media, the nozzles are positioned on the rake face side of the insert andthey are directed towards the cutting edge (the high-temperature area). The coolant is applied at high-pressureto improve the penetration of the cooling media along the cutting edge in the interface between the insert andworkpiece material (chip) as well as to increase chip breakability. However, the corresponding infusion ofcoolant media in the interface between the flank face of the insert and the work material (tertiary shear zone) hasbeen previously only scarcely addressed, as is the combined effect of coolant applications on rake and clearancesides of the insert. The present work addresses the influence of different pressure conditions in (flank: 0, 4 and8 MPa; rake: 8 and 16 MPa) on maximum flank wear, flank wear area, tool wear mechanism, and overall processperformance. Round uncoated inserts are used in a set of face turning experiments, conducted on the widely usedHRSA "Alloy 718" and run in two condition tests with respect to cutting speed (45 (low) and 90 (high) m/min).The results show that an increase in rake pressure from 8 to 16 MPa has certainly a positive impact on tool life.Furthermore, at higher vc of 90 m/min, cutting edge deterioration: due to an extensive abrasion and crack in thewear zone were the dominant wear mechanism. Nevertheless, the increase in coolant pressure condition to16 MPa reduced the amount of abrasion on the tool compared to 8 MPa. At the lower cutting speed, no crack orplastic deformation or extensive abrasion were found. When using 8 MPa pressure of coolant media on the flank,the wear was reduced by 20% compared to flood cooling conditions. Application of high-pressure cooling on theflank face has a positive effect on tool life and overall machining performance of Alloy 718.

  • 3.
    Venkatesh, L.
    et al.
    International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur, Hyderabad 500005, India. .
    Pitchuka, Suresh Babu
    International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur, Hyderabad 500005, India.
    Sivakumar, G.
    International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur, Hyderabad 500005, India.
    Gundakaram, Ravi C.
    International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur, Hyderabad 500005, India.
    Joshi, Shrikant V.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Samajdar, I.
    Department of Metallurgical Engineering & Materials Science, IIT Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076, India.
    Microstructural response of various chromium carbide based coatings to erosion and nano impact testing2017In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 386-387, p. 72-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we demonstrate the microstructure dependency of erosion behaviour of laser clad, detonation sprayed and atmospheric plasma sprayed chromium carbide based coatings. The final chromium carbide content in all the coatings was a strong function of rapid solidification rate associated with the processes. In the laser clad coating majority of the chromium carbides re-solidified while in the thermally sprayed coatings chromium carbide re-solidification was hindered to a large extent. Hence, the final chromium carbide content in the thermally sprayed coating decreased with increased extent of particle melting during spraying. Decarburisation and oxidation during thermal spraying lead to the formation of chromium carbides with lower carbon content and chromium oxide(s). Laser clad and detonation sprayed coatings, with higher chromium carbide content, showed lower erosion rates and exhibited fewer brittle erosion events. Embrittlement due to excessive dissolution of chromium carbides into the matrix and poor splat bonding were found to be the reasons for higher erosion rate of the plasma sprayed coating. Scanning electron microscopy and quantification of single erodent impact events clearly established ductile material removal in the laser clad and detonation sprayed coating and brittle material removal in the plasma sprayed coating as the dominant mechanism(s). A good agreement was found between solid particle erosion testing and nano impact testing results.

  • 4.
    Venkatesh, Lakshmi Narayanan
    et al.
    International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur, Hyderabad 500005, India; Department of Metallurgical Engineering & Materials Science, IIT Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076, India.
    Venkataraman, B.
    Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL), Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500058, India.
    Tak, Manish
    International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur, Hyderabad 500005, India.
    Sivakumar, Ganapathy S.
    International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur, Hyderabad 500005, India.
    Gundakaram, Ravi C.
    International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur, Hyderabad 500005, India.
    Joshi, Shrikant V.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Samajdar, Indradev S.
    Department of Metallurgical Engineering & Materials Science, IIT Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076, India.
    Room temperature and 600 °C erosion behaviour of various chromium carbide composite coatings2019In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 422-423, p. 44-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the erosion behaviour of laser clad chromium carbide-Ni rich alloy composite coatings with a wide range of carbide contents at room temperature and 600 °C were investigated. The variation in carbide content of the coatings was due to dilution from the substrate and the high cooling rate in the laser cladding process preventing re-solidification of the molten carbides. Erosion rate was observed to be a function of carbide content alone and was significantly higher at 600 °C as compared to room temperature. Erosion wear ratio (E90/E30) was also dependent on carbide content but decreased at higher temperature and higher carbide contents. A comparison of erosion behaviour with detonation and plasma sprayed counterparts showed the superior performance of laser clad coatings at 600 °C. The poor erosion performance of the detonation and plasma sprayed coatings was due to weak splat bonding. Thick oxide layer formed on the steel substrate after pre-oxidation resulted in its poor erosion performance.

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