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  • 1.
    Andersson, Joel
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes. Department of Materials Technology, GKN Aerospace Engine Systems, Trollhättan, Sweden och Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, G.
    Department of Materials Technology, GKN Aerospace Engine Systems, Trollhättan, Sweden och Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Viskari, L.
    Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Chaturvedi, M. C.
    Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
    Effect of Different Solution Heat Treatments on the Hot Ductility of Superalloys: Part 3 - Waspaloy2013In: Materials Science and Technology, ISSN 0267-0836, E-ISSN 1743-2847, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 43-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The susceptibility to heat affected zone cracking of Waspaloy has been investigated in terms of its hot ductility, measured as the reduction of area (RA). Gleeble testing with on-heating as well as on-cooling test cycles was carried out to illuminate the influence of different 4 h solution heat treatments between 996 and 1080°C. A ductility maximum of between 80 and 90%RA was found at 1050–1100°C for all conditions in the on-heating tests. Although the different heat treatment conditions showed similar macrohardness, the particle size and distribution of the γ′ and M23C6 phases differed, which significantly affected the on-heating ductility in the lower temperature test region. The ductile to brittle transition was initiated at 1100°C in the on-heating testing with indications of grain boundary liquation at the higher test temperatures. Ductility recovery, as measured in the on-cooling tests from 1240°C, was very limited with <30%RA for all conditions and test temperatures except for the 1080°C/4 h treatment, which exhibited 60%RA at 980°C.

  • 2. DAS, D.K.
    et al.
    Singh, Vakil
    Joshi, Shrikant V.
    High temperature oxidation behaviour of directionally solidified nickel base superalloy CM–247LC2003In: Materials Science and Technology, ISSN 0267-0836, E-ISSN 1743-2847, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 695-708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper describes the isothermal and cyclic oxidation behaviour of the technologically important nickel base directionally solidified superalloy CM-247LC in air in the temperature range 1000-1200°C. This superalloy behaves as a transition nickel base alloy under isothermal oxidation conditions and exhibits a fairly long transient oxidation period (~20 h at 1100°C). Irrespective of the temperature of exposure and nature of oxidation (isothermal or cyclic), a composite oxide scale develops on CM-247LC. While the outer portion of the oxide scale consists of either spinel (NiAl2O4) or a mixture of spinel and NiO, depending on oxidation temperature, the inner portion is always constituted of alumina. Beyond the transient period, the alloy is found to follow parabolic oxidation kinetics. The oxide layer that forms is invariably very non-uniform in thickness, and is dispersed with two types of oxide particles. While tantalum rich oxide particles are found scattered in the outer zone of the oxide layer, hafnium rich oxide particles lie close to the oxide/metal interface. Results also reveal that the nature of oxidation associated with the CM-247LC superalloy causes entrapment of metal islands in the oxide layer.

  • 3.
    Kumara, Chamara
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Deng, Dunyong
    Linköping University, Division of Engineering Materials, Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping, Sweden.
    Moverare, Johan
    Linköping University, Division of Engineering Materials, Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping, Sweden.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Modelling of anisotropic elastic properties in alloy 718 built by electron beam melting2018In: Materials Science and Technology, ISSN 0267-0836, E-ISSN 1743-2847, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 529-537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Owing to the inherent nature of the process, typically material produced via electron beam melting (EBM) has a columnar microstructure. As a result of that, the material will have anisotropic mechanical properties. In this work, anisotropic elastic properties of EBM built Alloy 718 samples at room temperature were investigated by using experiments and modelling work. Electron backscatter diffraction data from the sample microstructure was used to predict the Young’s modulus. The results showed that the model developed in the finite element software OOF2 was able to capture the anisotropy in the Young’s modulus. The samples showed transversely isotropic elastic properties having lowest Young’s modulus along build direction. In addition to that, complete transversely isotropic stiffness tensor of the sample was also calculated. © 2018 Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining.

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