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  • 1.
    Siverbo, Sven
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    Cäker, Mikael
    Trondheim Business School, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway; University of Gothenburg, School of Business, Economics and Law, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Åkesson, Johan
    University of Gothenburg, School of Business, Economics and Law, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Conceptualizing dysfunctional consequences of performance measurement in the public sector2019In: Public Management Review, ISSN 1471-9037, E-ISSN 1471-9045, Vol. 21, no 12, p. 1801-1823Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Performance measurement (PM) has become increasingly popular in the management of public sector organizations (PSOs). This is somewhat paradoxical considering that PM has been criticized for having dysfunctional consequences. Although there are reasons to believe that PM may have dysfunctional consequences, when they occur has not been clarified. The aim of this research is to conceptualize the dysfunctional consequences of PM in PSOs. Based on complementarity theory and contingency theory we conclude that dysfunctional consequences of PM are a matter of interactions between PM design and PM use, between control practices in the control system and between PM and context. © 2019, © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

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