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  • 1.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Ingelgård, Anders
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Mölnlycke Health Care .
    Koopmans, Linda
    Sustainable Productivity & Employability, Leiden, The Netherlands (NLD).
    Cross-cultural adaptation, from Dutch to Swedish language, of the Individual Work Performance Questionnaire2020In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 97-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: There is a need for a short, self-rated, validated and reliable instrument for individual work performance suitable for generic use in the Swedish work and organizational context. The Individual Work Performance Questionnaire (IWPQ), comprising originally 47 items, was initially developed in the Netherlands, based on a four-dimensional conceptual framework, in which individual work performance consisted of task performance, contextual performance, adaptive performance, and counterproductive work behavior. During the development process, IWPQ was shortened to 18 items with three scales formally labeled as Task performance, Contextual performance, and Counterproductive work behavior (CWB), capturing three work performance types. The current version of the IWPQ, consisting of 18 items and three scales, was then translated as well as cross-culturally adapted to American-English and Indonesian contexts.

    OBJECTIVES: To translate and adapt the current IWPQ version, consisting of 18 items, from the Dutch to the Swedish context, to assess its content validity through cognitive interviews, to apply it to a pilot group to present descriptive statistics, to calculate the questionnaire’s internal consistency, as well as to clarify whether the translated items capture three or four performance types.

    METHODS: The Dutch version of the IWPQ, consisting of 18 items, was translated into Swedish. A six-stage translation and adaptation process was used: forward translation, synthesis, back translation, harmonization, cognitive interviews, revision, and sampling and analyses of pilot data for 206 managers (149 women) from five Swedish municipalities.

    RESULTS: IWPQ instructions, wording of a few items and one response form were slightly modified. The pilot testing showed Cronbach’s alphas similar to the Dutch version of the IWPQ, ranging between 0.73 and 0.82, good mean-inter-item correlations (all above 0.36). In deciding how many factors to retain, we employed both parallel analysis (PA), and Velicer’s minimum average partial (MAP) test. The number of factors to retain was, as indicated by PA, four, and by MAP, three or four. Exploratory factor analysis (principal axis factoring) revealed clearly separate factors, corresponding to four, rather than three, performance types. A new factor, roughly representing adaptive performance, comprised in the original, longer version of the IWPQ, emerged.

    CONCLUSIONS: The Swedish version of the IWPQ was successfully translated and adapted in a pilot group of managers. Before it is used, it should be validated in a larger group of managers and in more heterogeneous groups of both white- and blue-collar workers.

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  • 2.
    Eklund, Annika
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Department of Individual and Behavioral studies, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Sterner, Anders
    Department of Work Life and Social Welfare, Faculty of Caring Sciences, University of Borås, Borås (SWE).
    Skyvell Nilsson, Maria
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Larsman, Pernilla
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE).
    The impact of transition programs on well-being, experiences of work environment and turnover intention among early career hospital nurses2024In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Transition programs for newly graduated nurses in hospital settings are reported to provide learning opportunities, strengthening confidence, workplace integration and skills, retention and job satisfaction. Still, our knowledge of long-term effects is scarce and few studies have used control groups.

    OBJECTIVE:

    To explore the long-term impact of having attended a transition program on the nurses’ experiences of the first years of practice. More specifically, ideology-infused psychological contract, ethical stress, perceived organizational support, job satisfaction, opportunities for learning, and intention to stay in the nursing profession, were explored as outcome variables.

    METHODS:

    A questionnaire survey was carried out among registered nurses from November 2019 to January 2020, with a 54% response rate. The analysis was based on 149 nurses who had attended a transition program, and 72 who had not attended. The nurses had seniority between one and three years. Independent samples t-test were used to investigate differences between the groups.

    RESULTS:

    The two groups showed small and non-significant differences in the outcome variables. However, regarding the frequency of ethical value conflicts induced by insufficient resources, as well as experiences of ethical value conflict distress, the group of nurses who had attended a transition program showed statistically significantly higher mean values, although the effect sizes were small.

    CONCLUSION:

    Newly graduated nurses need more than transition programs and skills training to progress in their nursing role and develop competence, increase job satisfaction, and reduce stress. Achieving these goals requires a long-term supportive learning environment that is integrated into everyday work.

  • 3.
    Haraldsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Occupational Safety and Health Care, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping (SWE); School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping (SWE).
    Nylander, Elisabeth
    Jönköping University Library, Jönköping University, Jönköping (SWE).
    Jonker, Dirk
    Occupational Safety and Health Care, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping (SWE); School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping (SWE).
    Ros, Axel
    School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping (SWE); Futurum –Academy for Healthcare, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping (SWE).
    Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences. School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping (SWE); Department of Behavioural Science, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo (NOR).
    Workplace interventions focusing on how to plan, organize and design the work environment in hospital settings: A systematic review2024In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Occupational Health Service (OHS) is a service that should support employers and employees with theirwork environment. Previous research indicates the need for deeper knowledge about the effect of workplace interventionswith a focus on planning, organizing and designing the workplace to improve work conditions in hospital settings.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim was to evaluate the outcomes, workplace interventions and intervention strategies in hospital settings.

    METHODS: A systematic literature review was conducted. CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycInfo, Scopus, and Web of ScienceCore Collection were searched in September 2021. The Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool was used to evaluate the quality ofthe included studies. Study results are presented through a narrative synthesis. A protocol for this study was registered onthe Open Science Framework.

    RESULTS: Twenty-six studies, published between 2010 and 2021, were included. These included randomized controlledtrials (RCTs), non-RCTs, and mixed methods reports with moderate to good quality. The results support the use of workplaceinterventions to improve work conditions, health, and well-being in hospital settings. Combinations of different interventions,tailored to the specific organization, were used. Important intervention strategies commonly used in the start-up, evaluation,and intervention of successful workplace interventions, were identified. Using a pragmatist complexity approach in workplaceinterventions can improve outcomes by providing clear intervention strategies and combinations of tailored interventions,related to context specific problems.

    CONCLUSION: OHS support in workplace interventions with clear intervention strategies will contribute to improve workconditions, health and well-being in hospital settings.

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    fulltext
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