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  • 1.
    Dale, Björg
    et al.
    University of Agder.
    Sævereid, Hans Inge
    Kirkevold, Marit
    Söderhamn, Olle
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Advanced Nursing.
    Formal and informal care in relation to activities of daily living and self-perceived health among older care-dependent individuals in Norway.2008In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 194-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Research about formal care of older home-dwelling people in the Nordic countries is comprehensive, while research on informal care has been less inclusive.

    Aim. To describe self-reported activities of daily living and perceived health, and to relate them to amount and types of formal and informal care received by a group of care-dependent, home-dwelling older individuals in Norway.

    Design and methods. A sample consisting of 242 persons aged 75+ years receiving home nursing services. Data were collected by means of structured interviews with questions about activities of daily living (ADL), amount and types of formal and informal care and demographic variables. Descriptive statistics, chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U-test and multiple stepwise regression were used in the analyses.

    Results. ADL dependency was the only predictor for explaining quantity of home nursing received. Those who received a generous amount of formal care also received a lot of care and support from informal networks. The type of care from the two sources differed. The home nurses performed PADL tasks. While the informal caregivers offered help with IADL tasks.

    Conclusion. This study of receiving help in this group of older people in Norway shows that formal and informal care resources complement one another.

  • 2.
    Elfstrand Corlin, Tinna
    et al.
    School of Health and Education, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Kajonius, Petri
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. School of Health and Education, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Kazemi, Ali
    School of Health and Education, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    The impact of personality on person-centred care: a study of care staff in Swedish nursing homes2017In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 12, no 2, article id e12132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim and objective

    In this study, we explore how personal and situational factors relate to the provision of person-centred care (PCC) in nursing homes. Specifically, we focus on the relationship between the care staff's personality traits and provision of PCC and to what extent perceptions of the working environment influences this relationship.

    Background

    The ultimate goal of elderly care is to meet the older person's needs and individual preferences (PCC). Interpersonal aspects of care and the quality of relationship between the care staff and the older person are therefore central in PCC.

    Design and methods

    A cross-sectional Swedish sample of elderly care staff (= 322) completed an electronic survey including measures of personality (Mini-IPIP) and person-centred care (Individualized Care Inventory, ICI). A principal component analysis was conducted on the ICI-data to separate the user orientation (process quality) of PCC from the preconditions (structure quality) of PCC.

    Results

    Among the five factors of personality, neuroticism was the strongest predictor of ICI user orientation. ICI preconditions significantly mediated this relationship, indicating the importance of a supportive working environment. In addition, stress was introduced as a potential explanation and was shown to mediate the impact of neuroticism on ICI preconditions.

    Conclusions

    Personality traits have a significant impact on user orientation, and the perception of a supportive and stress free working environment is an important prerequisite for achieving high-quality person-centred elderly care.

    Implications for practice

    Understanding how personality is linked to the way care staff interacts with the older person adds a new perspective on provision of person-centred elderly care.

  • 3.
    Isaksson, Ulf
    et al.
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing.
    Åström, Sture
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, postgraduate level.
    Graneheim, Ulla H.
    Umeå University, Department of Nursing.
    Being flexible and tuning in: Professional caregivers’ reflections on management of violent behaviour in nursing homes2013In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 290-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: This qualitative, descriptive study aimed to illuminate professional caregivers’ reflections on managing residents’ violent behaviour in nursing homes. Background: Violence towards caregivers in the care of older people is a challenge attracting increasing attention in nursing research. However, studies that focus on the approaches caregivers in nursing homes resort to and how they manage everyday care situations involving threats and violent situations are relatively few. Methods: The study was based on 41 interviews in which the caregivers reflected on their own courses of action in violent situations. The interviews were subjected to qualitative content analysis. Results: This study showed that caregivers were flexible and in tune with the resident by averting and defusing threatening and violent situations. The caregivers tried to give care in line with the residents’ condition, control their own spontaneous reactions and interpret the residents’ reactions as communicative signs indicating how they should interact with the resident in the situation. As a last resort, when previous approaches had been unsuccessful, the caregivers took a firm stand, confronted the resident and the violent behaviour more directly, but with respect and with the residents’ best interests in mind. Conclusions: These findings illuminate how caregivers successfully can manage threatening and violent behavior in nursing homes by being flexible and tuning in with the resident but also by taking a firm stand with the residents’ best interests in mind. To be flexible and in tune with residents, it is important to know the residents’ personal histories. This may mean involving stakeholders, such as family members and friends, in the care of residents with violent behaviour. Implications for practice: We believe that it is important to involve stakeholders in the care of threatening and violent residents in nursing homes as it is important to get information on the residents’ personal history. However, there are risks when interpreting residents’ behaviour in light of their personal histories as relatives experiences may be subjective and the information may give the caregivers preconceived ideas about the resident. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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