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  • 1.
    Duell, Natasha
    et al.
    Temple University, Department of Psychology,Philadelphia, USA.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University,Department of Psychology, Philadelphia, PA, USA and King Abdulaziz University.
    Icenogle, Grace
    Temple University, Department of Psychology,Philadelphia, USA.
    Chein, Jason
    Temple University, Department of Psychology,Philadelphia, USA.
    Chaudhary, Nandita
    University of Delhi, Department of Human Development and Childhood Studies, Lady Irwin College, New Delhi, India..
    Di Giunta, Laura
    La Sapienza University of Rome, Interuniversity Centre for Research in the Genesis and Development of Prosocial and Antisocial Motivations, Rome, Italy.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA..
    Fanti, Kostas A.
    University of Cyprus, Department of Psychology, Kallipoleos, Cyprus..
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA..
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Department of Educational Psychology, Maseno, Kenya.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma, La Sapienza, Department of Psychology, Roma, RM, Italy.
    Skinner, Anne T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand..
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Consultorio Psicológico Popular, Medellín, Colombia .
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Department of Psychology, Metro Manila, Philippines.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University and Emirates College for Advanced Education, Al Zafranah, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.
    Takash, Hanan M. S.
    Hashemite University, Queen Rania Faculty for Childhood, Zarqa, Jordan..
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Department of Psychology, Caserta, CE, Italy .
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Department of Psychology,Zhuhai Shi, China..
    Age patterns in risk taking across the world2018In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 1052-1072Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epidemiological data indicate that risk behaviors are among the leading causes of adolescent morbidity and mortality worldwide. Consistent with this, laboratory-based studies of age differences in risk behavior allude to a peak in adolescence, suggesting that adolescents demonstrate a heightened propensity, or inherent inclination, to take risks. Unlike epidemiological reports, studies of risk taking propensity have been limited to Western samples, leaving questions about the extent to which heightened risk taking propensity is an inherent or culturally constructed aspect of adolescence. In the present study, age patterns in risk-taking propensity (using two laboratory tasks: the Stoplight and the BART) and real-world risk taking (using self-reports of health and antisocial risk taking) were examined in a sample of 5,227 individuals (50.7% female) ages 10-30 (M = 17.05 years, SD = 5.91) from 11 Western and non-Western countries (China, Colombia, Cyprus, India, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the US). Two hypotheses were tested: (1) risk taking follows an inverted-U pattern across age groups, peaking earlier on measures of risk taking propensity than on measures of real-world risk taking, and (2) age patterns in risk taking propensity are more consistent across countries than age patterns in real-world risk taking. Overall, risk taking followed the hypothesized inverted-U pattern across age groups, with health risk taking evincing the latest peak. Age patterns in risk taking propensity were more consistent across countries than age patterns in real-world risk taking. Results suggest that although the association between age and risk taking is sensitive to measurement and culture, around the world, risk taking is generally highest among late adolescents

  • 2.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Boele, Savannah
    Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherland.
    Skoog, Therése
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Parent-Adolescent Communication and Adolescent Delinquency: Unraveling Within-Family Processes from Between-Family Differences.2019In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 48, no 9, p. 1707-1723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the factors that predict adolescent delinquency is a key topic in parenting research. An open question is whether prior results indicating relative differences between families reflect the dynamic processes occurring within families. Therefore, this study investigated concurrent and lagged associations among parental behavioral control, parental solicitation, adolescent disclosure, and adolescent delinquency by separating between-family and within-family effects in three-wave annual data (N = 1515; Mage = 13.01 years at T1; 50.6% girls). At the within-family level, parental behavioral control negatively predicted adolescent delinquency. Adolescent disclosure and delinquency, and adolescent disclosure and parental solicitation, reciprocally predicted each other. Parental solicitation negatively predicted parental behavioral control. The findings indicate a prominent role of adolescent disclosure in within-family processes concerning parental-adolescent communication and adolescent delinquency.

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