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  • 1.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Skog, Therése
    Jönköping University, Jönköping; Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Norwegian University of Science and technology, Norway.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Gerdner, Arne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Does one Size Fit All?: Linking Parenting With Adolescent Substance Use and Adolescent Temperament2020In: Journal of research on adolescence, ISSN 1050-8392, E-ISSN 1532-7795, Vol. 30, no suppl 2, p. 443-457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using longitudinal Swedish data from 1,373 early‐adolescent youths, this study aims to answer the question of whether the previously established protective function of parental knowledge and its sources — adolescent disclosure, parental solicitation, and parental control—on substance use among early‐adolescents is moderated by the adolescent's temperament. Adolescent temperament moderated several links between parental knowledge and its sources and adolescent substance use. The most pronounced moderating results were found for those adolescents with fearless, socially detached and thrill‐seeking tendencies. For these "detached thrill‐seekers", bidirectional links between adolescent disclosure and substance use, and negative links between parental solicitation and substance use were found. We recommend, therefore, that adolescent temperament is considered when designing parenting programs.

  • 2.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    et al.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Rothenberg, W. Andrew
    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA.
    Jensen, Todd M.
    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA.
    Lippold, Melissa A.
    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA.
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples “Federico II”, Department of Psychology, Italy.
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Department of Psychology, China.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, USA.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    La Sapienza University of Rome, Interuniversity Centre for Research in the Genesis and Development of Prosocial and Antisocial Motivations, Rome, Italy.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Maseno, Kenya.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA ; King Abdulaziz University.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Consultorio Psicológico Popular, Medellín, Colombia .
    Peña Alampay, Liana
    Ateneo de Manila University, Department of Psychology, 1000 Metro Manila National Capital Region, Philippin.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University and Emirates College for Advanced Education, Zarqa, Jordan.
    Bidirectional Relations Between Parenting and Behavior Problems From Age 8 to 13 in Nine Countries2018In: Journal of research on adolescence, ISSN 1050-8392, E-ISSN 1532-7795, Vol. 28, no 3, SI, p. 571-590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study used data from 12 cultural groups in nine countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States; N=1,298) to understand the cross-cultural generalizability of how parental warmth and control are bidirectionally related to externalizing and internalizing behaviors from childhood to early adolescence. Mothers, fathers, and children completed measures when children were ages 8-13. Multiple-group autoregressive, cross-lagged structural equationmodels revealed that child effects rather than parent effects may better characterize how warmth and control are related to child externalizing and internalizing behaviors over time, and that parent effects may be more characteristic of relations between parental warmth and control and child externalizing and internalizing behavior during childhood than early adolescence.

  • 3.
    Syed, Moin
    et al.
    University of Minnesota, USA.
    Juang, Linda P.
    University of Potsdam, Germany.
    Svensson, Ylva
    Gothenburg university, Sweden.
    Toward a new understanding of ethnic/racial settings for ethnic/racial identity development2018In: Journal of research on adolescence, ISSN 1050-8392, E-ISSN 1532-7795, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 262-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this conceptual article is to advance theory and research on one critical aspect of the context of ethnic–racial identity (ERI) development: ethnic–racial settings, or the objective and subjective nature of group representationwithin an individual's context. We present a new conceptual framework that consists of four dimensions: (1) perspective(that settings can be understood in both objective and subjective terms); (2) differentiation (how groups are defined in asetting); (3) heterogeneity (the range of groups in a setting); and (4) proximity (the distance between the individual andthe setting). Clarifying this complexity is crucial for advancing a more coherent understanding of how ethnic–racial set-tings are related to ERI development.

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