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  • 1.
    Bornstein, Marc H
    et al.
    Child and Family Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, Bethesda, MD, USA..
    Putnick, Diane L
    Child and Family Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, Bethesda, MD, USA..
    Lansford, Jennifer E
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M
    Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan..
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy.
    Bombi, Anna Silvia
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Pschology, Italy..
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Macau, China.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Amherst, MA, USA..
    Di Giunta, Laura
    La Sapienza University of Rome, Interuniversity Centre for Research in the Genesis and Development of Prosocial and Antisocial Motivations, Rome, Italy.
    Dodge, Kenneth A
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA..
    Malone, Patrick S
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA..
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Maseno, Kenya..
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Skinner, Ann T
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA..
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand..
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Rome University La Sapienza, Rome, Italy..
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    University of Rome Foro Italico, Italy..
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Mixed blessings: parental religiousness, parenting, and child adjustment in global perspective.2017In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, ISSN 0021-9630, E-ISSN 1469-7610, Vol. 58, no 8, p. 880-892Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Most studies of the effects of parental religiousness on parenting and child development focus on a particular religion or cultural group, which limits generalizations that can be made about the effects of parental religiousness on family life.

    METHODS: We assessed the associations among parental religiousness, parenting, and children's adjustment in a 3-year longitudinal investigation of 1,198 families from nine countries. We included four religions (Catholicism, Protestantism, Buddhism, and Islam) plus unaffiliated parents, two positive (efficacy and warmth) and two negative (control and rejection) parenting practices, and two positive (social competence and school performance) and two negative (internalizing and externalizing) child outcomes. Parents and children were informants.

    RESULTS: Greater parent religiousness had both positive and negative associations with parenting and child adjustment. Greater parent religiousness when children were age 8 was associated with higher parental efficacy at age 9 and, in turn, children's better social competence and school performance and fewer child internalizing and externalizing problems at age 10. However, greater parent religiousness at age 8 was also associated with more parental control at age 9, which in turn was associated with more child internalizing and externalizing problems at age 10. Parental warmth and rejection had inconsistent relations with parental religiousness and child outcomes depending on the informant. With a few exceptions, similar patterns of results held for all four religions and the unaffiliated, nine sites, mothers and fathers, girls and boys, and controlling for demographic covariates.

    CONCLUSIONS: Parents and children agree that parental religiousness is associated with more controlling parenting and, in turn, increased child problem behaviors. However, children see religiousness as related to parental rejection, whereas parents see religiousness as related to parental efficacy and warmth, which have different associations with child functioning. Studying both parent and child views of religiousness and parenting are important to understand the effects of parental religiousness on parents and children.

  • 2.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    et al.
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Luengo Kanacri, Bernadette Paula
    Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Psychology,, Rome, Italy.
    Malone, Patrick S.
    University of South Carolina, Department of Psychology, Columbia, SC, USA.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    La Sapienza University of Rome, Interuniversity Centre for Research in the Genesis and Development of Prosocial and Antisocial Motivations, Rome, Italy.
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples, Department of Psychology, , Caserta, Italy.
    Bombi, Anna Silvia
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Pschology, Italy..
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    University of Rome Foro Italico, Italy..
    Miranda, Maria Concetta
    Second University of Naples, Department of Psychology, , Caserta, Italy.
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Facultad de Psicologia, Medellin, Colombia.
    Alampay, Liane Pena
    Ateneo de Manila University, Department of Psychology, Metropolitan Manila, Philippines.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Department of Special Education, Zarqa, Jordan.
    Chang, Lei
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Educational Psychology, Hong Kong, China.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Virginia Tech, Department of Psychology, Blacksburg, VA, USA.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Department of Educational Psychology, Maseno, Kenya.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Positive parenting and children’s prosocial behavior in eight countries2016In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, ISSN 0021-9630, E-ISSN 1469-7610, Vol. 57, no 7, p. 824-834Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Research supports the beneficial role of prosocial behaviors on children’s adjustment and successful youth development. Empirical studies point to reciprocal relations between negative parenting and children’s maladjustment, but reciprocal relations between positive parenting and children’s prosocial behavior are understudied. In this study reciprocal relations between two different dimensions of positive parenting (quality of the mother–child relationship and the use of balanced positive discipline) and children’s prosocial behavior were examined in Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States. Methods Mother–child dyads (N = 1105) provided data over 2 years in two waves (Mage of child in wave 1 = 9.31 years, SD = 0.73; 50% female). Results A model of reciprocal relations between parenting dimensions, but not among parenting and children’s prosocial behavior, emerged. In particular, children with higher levels of prosocial behavior at age 9 elicited higher levels of mother–child relationship quality in the following year. Conclusions Findings yielded similar relations across countries, evidencing that being prosocial in late childhood contributes to some degree to the enhancement of a nurturing and involved mother–child relationship in countries that vary widely on sociodemographic profiles and psychological characteristics. Policy and intervention implications of this study are discussed.

  • 3.
    Putnick, Diane L.
    et al.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Child and Family Research, Bethesda.
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Child and Family Research, Bethesda.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC.
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailan.
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    La Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Psychology.
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    University of Rome Foro Italico, Italy..
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, Metro Manila, Philippines.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan.
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples.
    Bombi, Anna Silvia
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Pschology, Italy..
    Chang, Lei
    Chinese University of Hong Kong.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    La Sapienza University of Rome, Interuniversity Centre for Research in the Genesis and Development of Prosocial and Antisocial Motivations, Rome, Italy.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Maseno, Kenya.
    Perceived mother and father acceptance-rejection predict four unique aspects of child adjustment across nine countries2015In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, ISSN 0021-9630, E-ISSN 1469-7610, Vol. 56, no 8, p. 923-932Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background It is generally believed that parental rejection of children leads to child maladaptation. However, the specific effects of perceived parental acceptance-rejection on diverse domains of child adjustment and development have been incompletely documented, and whether these effects hold across diverse populations and for mothers and fathers are still open questions. Methods This study assessed children’s perceptions of mother and father acceptance-rejection in 1,247 families from China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States as antecedent predictors of later internalizing and externalizing behavior problems, school performance, prosocial behavior, and social competence. Results Higher perceived parental rejection predicted increases in internalizing and externalizing behavior problems and decreases in school performance and prosocial behavior across 3 years controlling for within-wave relations, stability across waves, and parental age, education, and social desirability bias. Patterns of relations were similar across mothers and fathers and, with a few exceptions, all nine countries. Conclusions Children’s perceptions of maternal and paternal acceptance-rejection have small but nearly universal effects on multiple aspects of their adjustment and development regardless of the family’s country of origin.

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