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  • 1.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    et al.
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, USA.
    Godwin, Jennifer
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples, Caserta, Italy.
    Bombi, Anna Silvia
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Pschology, Italy..
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, China.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    La Sapienza University of Rome, Interuniversity Centre for Research in the Genesis and Development of Prosocial and Antisocial Motivations, Rome, Italy.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Maseno, Kenya.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Medellín, Colombia.
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    University of Rome Foro Italico, Italy..
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan.
    Within- and between-person and group variance in behavior and beliefs in cross-cultural longitudinal data2018In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 62, p. 207-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract This study grapples with what it means to be part of a cultural group, from a statistical modeling perspective. The method we present compares within- and between-cultural group variability, in behaviors in families. We demonstrate the method using a cross-cultural study of adolescent development and parenting, involving three biennial waves of longitudinal data from 1296 eight-year-olds and their parents (multiple cultures in nine countries). Family members completed surveys about parental negativity and positivity, child academic and social-emotional adjustment, and attitudes about parenting and adolescent behavior. Variance estimates were computed at the cultural group, person, and within-person level using multilevel models. Of the longitudinally consistent variance, most was within and not between cultural groups—although there was a wide range of between-group differences. This approach to quantifying cultural group variability may prove valuable when applied to quantitative studies of acculturation.

  • 2.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Marshall, Sheila K.
    University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Svensson, Ylva
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Depressive symptoms and non-suicidal self-injury during adolescence: Latent patterns of short-term stability and change2019In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 75, p. 163-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction:

    Depressive symptoms and non-suicidal self-injury not only increase in prevalenceduring adolescence, but they can also occur together. Both psychological problems seem to have similar precipitating conditions, suggesting they have transdiagnostic conditions—personal or contextual characteristics that contribute to co-occurrence. We sought to understand when these two problems co-occur and what is related to their co-occurrence.

    Methods:

    Using a pattern-centered approach and two waves of longitudinal data collected an-nually, we examined latent profiles of depressive symptoms and self-injury among a Swedish sample of adolescents aged 12 to 16 (MageT1= 13.65 years,SD= 0.64), 53.7% boys and 47.3% girls. Most of the adolescents were Swedish (89%), with parents who were married or cohabitating (68%). We also examined the transitions between profiles over time.

    Results:

    Our results suggest that during this time frame, depressive symptoms and self-injury tend to emerge and stabilize or abate together. We also examined a broad array of predictors, including individual characteristics, emotion dysregulation, experiences with friends, parents' negative reactions to behavior, and school stress. The significant unique predictors suggest that adolescents who reported being subjected to relational aggression, having negative experienceswhile drinking, and low self-esteem had a greater probability of moving from moderate to high levels or maintaining high levels of depressive symptoms and self-injury, compared to adolescents classified in the other statuses.

    Conclusions:

    Focusing on negative interpersonal experiences and selfesteem as transdiagnostic conditions may guide research and aid clinicians in supporting adolescents who feel depressed and engage in self-injury. Symptoms of depression increase during adolescence (Hankin et al., 1998;Lewinsohn, Rohde, Seeley, Klein, & Gotlib, 2000) as doself-injurious behaviors (Hilt, Nock, Lloyd-Richardson, & Prinstein, 2008; Lloyd-Richardson, Perrine, Dierker, & Kelley, 2007; Ross &Heath, 2002). Defined as direct and intentional destruction of one's own body tissue without suicidal intent, non-suicidal self-injury(NSSI) includes cutting, hitting, burning, and scratching (Nock, 2010). Although rates of NSSI are typically lower than those of depressive symptoms, they often covary (Auerbach et al., 2014; Lloyd-Richardson et al., 2007; Nock, Joiner, Gordon, Lloyd-Richardson, & Prinstein, 2006; Zetterqvist, Lundh, Dahlström, & Svedin, 2013). In this study, we focused on the co-occurrence of depressive symptoms and NSSI. We aimed to understand when these problems occurred together, in comparison to when adolescents exhibit only one problem or none and to explore how co-occurrence arises.https://doi.org/10.1016/j.adolescence.2019.07.013

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