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  • 1.
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    et al.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Child and Family Research, Bethesda.
    Putnick, Diane L.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Child and Family Research, Bethesda.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC,.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC,.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Thailand.
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Rome University ‘La Sapienza’, Faculty of Psychology, Italy.
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    University of Rome Foro Italico, Italy..
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Department of Psychology, Quezon, Philippines.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Queen Rania Faculty for Childhood, Jordan.
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples, Department of Psychology, Italy.
    Bombi, Anna Silvia
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Pschology, Italy..
    Chang, Lei
    Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Educational Psychology, China.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Psychology, Blacksburg, VA, USA.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    La Sapienza University of Rome, Interuniversity Centre for Research in the Genesis and Development of Prosocial and Antisocial Motivations, Rome, Italy.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC,.
    Malone, Patrick S.
    University of South Carolina, Department of Psychology, Columbia, SC, USA.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Department of Psychology, Kenya.
    Mother and father socially desirable responding in nine countries: Two kinds of agreement and relations to parenting self-reports2015In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 174-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We assessed 2 forms of agreement between mothers’ and fathers’ socially desirable responding in China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand and the United States (N = 1110 families). Mothers and fathers in all 9 countries reported socially desirable responding in the upper half of the distribution, and countries varied minimally (but China was higher than the cross-country grand mean and Sweden lower). Mothers and fathers did not differ in reported levels of socially desirable responding, and mothers’ and fathers’ socially desirable responding were largely uncorrelated. With one exception, mothers’ and fathers’ socially desirable responding were similarly correlated with self-perceptions of parenting, and correlations varied somewhat across countries. These findings are set in a discussion of socially desirable responding, cultural psychology and family systems.

  • 2.
    Lansford, Jennifer E
    et al.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Godwin, Jennifer
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Department of Psychology, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana Maria
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Consultorio Psicológico Popular, Medellín, Colombia.
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    University of Rome Foro Italico, Italy..
    Al-Hassan, Suha M
    Emirates College for Advanced Education. Queen Rania Faculty for Childhood, Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan, and Health and Special Education Division, , Abu Dhabi, UAE.
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples, Department of Psychology, Caserta, Italy.
    Bombi, Anna Silvia
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Pschology, Italy..
    Bornstein, Marc H
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Child and Family Research Program in Developmental Neuroscience, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Chang, Lei
    Hong Kong Institute of Education, Department of Psychological Studies, Hong Kong, China.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Psychology, Blacksburg, VA, USA.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    La Sapienza University of Rome, Interuniversity Centre for Research in the Genesis and Development of Prosocial and Antisocial Motivations, Rome, Italy.
    Dodge, Kenneth A
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Malone, Patrick S
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Department of Education Psychology, Maseno, Kenya.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Skinner, Ann T
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Mothers', fathers' and children's perceptions of parents' expectations about children's family obligations in nine countries.2016In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 51, no 5, p. 366-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children's family obligations involve assistance and respect that children are expected to provide to immediate and extended family members and reflect beliefs related to family life that may differ across cultural groups. Mothers, fathers and children (N = 1432 families) in 13 cultural groups in 9 countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Sweden, Thailand and United States) reported on their expectations regarding children's family obligations and parenting attitudes and behaviours. Within families, mothers and fathers had more concordant expectations regarding children's family obligations than did parents and children. Parenting behaviours that were warmer, less neglectful and more controlling as well as parenting attitudes that were more authoritarian were related to higher expectations regarding children's family obligations between families within cultures as well as between cultures. These international findings advance understanding of children's family obligations by contextualising them both within families and across a number of diverse cultural groups in 9 countries.

  • 3.
    Mac Giolla, Erik
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Psychology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kajonius, Petri
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. University of Skövde, Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Skövde, Sweden.
    Sex differences in personality are larger in gender equal countries: Replicating and extending a surprising finding.2019In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 54, no 6, p. 705-711Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sex differences in personality have been shown to be larger in more gender equal countries. We advance this research by using an extensive personality measure, the IPIP-NEO-120, with large country samples (N > 1000), from 22 countries. Furthermore, to capture the multidimensionality of personality we measure sex differences with a multivariate effect size (Mahalanobis distance D). Results indicate that past research, using univariate measures of effect size, have underestimated the size of between-country sex differences in personality. Confirming past research, there was a strong correlation (r = .69) between a country's sex differences in personality and their Gender Equality Index. Additional analyses showed that women typically score higher than men on all five trait factors (Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness and Conscientiousness), and that these relative differences are larger in more gender equal countries. We speculate that as gender equality increases both men and women gravitate towards their traditional gender roles.

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