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  • 1.
    Alampay, Liane Pena
    et al.
    Ateneo de Manila University, Philippines..
    Godwin, Jennifer
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, USA..
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, USA..
    Bombi, Anna Silvia
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Pschology, Italy..
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, MD, USA..
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, China..
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA..
    Di Giunta, Laura
    La Sapienza University of Rome, Interuniversity Centre for Research in the Genesis and Development of Prosocial and Antisocial Motivations, Rome, Italy.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, USA..
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, USA..
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Kenya..
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Thailand..
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana M.
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Colombia..
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    University of Rome Foro Italico, Italy..
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Jordan, and Emirates College for Advanced Education, UAE..
    Bacchini, Dario
    Second University of Naples, Italy..
    Severity and justness do not moderate the relation between corporal punishment and negative child outcomes: A multicultural and longitudinal study2017In: International Journal of Behavioral Development, ISSN 0165-0254, E-ISSN 1464-0651, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 491-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is strong evidence of a positive association between corporal punishment and negative child outcomes, but previous studies have suggested that the manner in which parents implement corporal punishment moderates the effects of its use. This study investigated whether severity and justness in the use of corporal punishment moderate the associations between frequency of corporal punishment and child externalizing and internalizing behaviors. This question was examined using a multicultural sample from eight countries and two waves of data collected one year apart. Interviews were conducted with 998 children aged 7–10 years, and their mothers and fathers, from China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Thailand, and the United States. Mothers and fathers responded to questions on the frequency, severity, and justness of their use of corporal punishment; they also reported on the externalizing and internalizing behavior of their child. Children reported on their aggression. Multigroup path models revealed that across cultural groups, and as reported by mothers and fathers, there is a positive relation between the frequency of corporal punishment and externalizing child behaviors. Mother-reported severity and father-reported justness were associated with child-reported aggression. Neither severity nor justness moderated the relation between frequency of corporal punishment and child problem behavior. The null result suggests that more use of corporal punishment is harmful to children regardless of how it is implemented, but requires further substantiation as the study is unable to definitively conclude that there is no true interaction effect.

  • 2.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    et al.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Medellín, Colombia.
    Zelli, Arnaldo
    University of Rome Foro Italico, Italy..
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan and Emirates College for Advanced Education.
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples “Federico II”, Department of Psychology, Italy.
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Department of Psychology, China.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, USA.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    La Sapienza University of Rome, Interuniversity Centre for Research in the Genesis and Development of Prosocial and Antisocial Motivations, Rome, Italy.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Maseno, Kenya.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology, Rome, Italy.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA ; King Abdulaziz University.
    Household income predicts trajectories of child internalizing and externalizing behavior in high-, middle-, and low-income countries2019In: International Journal of Behavioral Development, ISSN 0165-0254, E-ISSN 1464-0651, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 74-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined longitudinal links between household income and parents' education and children's trajectories of internalizing and externalizing behaviors from age 8 to 10 reported by mothers, fathers, and children. Longitudinal data from 1,190 families in 11 cultural groups in eight countries (Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and United States) were included. Multigroup structural equation models revealed that household income, but not maternal or paternal education, was related to trajectories of mother-, father-, and child-reported internalizing and externalizing problems in each of the 11 cultural groups. Our findings highlight that in low-, middle-, and high-income countries, socioeconomic risk is related to children's internalizing and externalizing problems, extending the international focus beyond children's physical health to their emotional and behavioral development.

  • 3.
    Stattin, Håkan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Svensson, Ylva
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Korol, Liliia
    National University of Ostroh Academy, Ukraine.
    Schools can be supporting environments in disadvantaged neighborhoods2019In: International Journal of Behavioral Development, ISSN 0165-0254, E-ISSN 1464-0651, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 383-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, as in many other European countries, poor neighborhoods with ethnically diverse inhabitants and high crime rates have grown up around big cities in the last decades. We hypothesized that, compared with adolescents in advantaged neighborhoods, adolescents in disadvantaged neighborhoods would perceive their schools as relatively safe, due to their contrast with the more threatening and dangerous neighborhoods they lived in. Also, they would perceive their schools as relatively more open to their influence, due to the contrast with a lack of influence in their families. More broadly, they would experience their schools as supporting environments to a greater extent than adolescents in advantaged neighborhoods. We tested these ideas using a sample of 1390 adolescents (M age = 14.34, SD = 1.01) in a Swedish city. The hypotheses were supported, and the findings were most salient for immigrant adolescents in disadvantaged neighborhoods. Thus, particularly for immigrant adolescents in disadvantaged neighborhoods, schools can be supporting environments, which should have implications for local policies regarding resource allocation to schools and student influence. Overall, schools seem to be able to play an important role in students€™ lives by functioning as a positive contrast to negative out-of-school experiences in disadvantaged neighborhoods. © The Author(s) 2019.

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