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  • 1.
    Boson, Karin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Department of Behavioral SDepartment of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg (SWE) ;Department of Psychology, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Lillehammer (NOR).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Claesdotter-Knutsson, Emma
    Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund (SWE); Region Skåne, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Regional Outpatient Care, Lund University Hospital, Lund (SWE).
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (SWE).
    Adolescent gaming and parent–child emotional closeness: bivariate relationships in a longitudinal perspective2024In: Current Psychology, ISSN 1046-1310, E-ISSN 1936-4733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to add knowledge of the longitudinal associations between gaming and emotional closeness between parents and their children. We hypothesized that parent–child emotional closeness was linked to less gaming activity over time and that more gaming activity was linked to less parent–child emotional closeness over time. We also tested the moderating efect of child gender on these anticipated links. This study involved a sample of Swedish adolescents, spanning the developmental years from age 12.5 to 17, and included data from two time points (T1; year 2013 and T2; years 2017/2018) with N=782 participants (T1 Mage=12.10, SD=0.40; 49.6% girls). Utilizing a series of Cross-Lagged Panel Models, we found that emotional closeness to both mother and father predicted less time spent on gaming over time. More time spent on gaming predicted less emotional closeness to mother over time. Additionally, gaming activity among girls was specifcally related to less emotional closeness to their father over time. Strengthening parent–child relationships and emotional bonds may be crucial in safeguarding adolescents from developing habits of excessive gaming that could potentially pose problems for their psychosocial development.

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  • 2.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Kajonius, Petri
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Department of Psychology, Lund University, Lund (SWE).
    Hallberg, Angela
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Skog, Sandra
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies.
    Hellström, Åke
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (SWE).
    Leading with a cool head and a warm heart: trait-based leadership resources linked to task performance, perceived stress, and work engagement2023In: Current Psychology, ISSN 1046-1310, E-ISSN 1936-4733, Vol. 42, p. 299559-29580Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leaders of today need to achieve well in terms of task performance, perceiving low stress, and having high levels of work engagement. One may ask whether trait-based leadership resource factors can be identified and how such resource factors might relate to task performance, perceived stress, and work engagement. Our aim was to test the hypothesis, derived from Hobfoll’s motivational Conservation of Resources (COR) theory, that there are trait-based leadership resource factors, which are differentially correlated to the leaders’ task performance, perceived stress, and work engagement. Leaders (N = 344) aged from 23 to 65 years (M = 49, SD = 8.6; 58% women) completed an online questionnaire including measures of task performance, perceived stress, work engagement, personality traits, trait emotional intelligence, empathy, performance-related self-esteem, compassionate and rational leadership competence, and coping resources for stress. Using exploratory factor analysis, we identified four trait-based leadership resource factors. With Bonferroni adjustment, and controlling for sex, age, number of years in the current managerial position, self-deceptive enhancement, and impression management, only Rational Mastery was significantly positively correlated with task performance. Rational Mastery, Efficient Coping, and Modesty were negatively correlated with perceived stress, and all factors except Modesty, but including the fourth (Good-Heartedness) were positively correlated with work engagement. Organizations striving for sustainable work conditions should support trait-based leadership, which depends not only on a task-oriented resource such as rational mastery, but also on human-oriented resources such as efficient coping, modesty, and good-heartedness, all of them being differentially related to task performance, perceived stress, and work engagement.  

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  • 3.
    Hjalmarsson, Annica K. V.
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Relationship between emotional intelligence, personality, and self-perceived individual work performance: A cross-sectional study on the Swedish version of TEIQue-SF2022In: Current Psychology, ISSN 1046-1310, E-ISSN 1936-4733, Vol. 41, p. 2558-2573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People with high emotional intelligence (EI) understand themselves and others well, and perform well at work. Trait EI has been described as “a constellation of emotion-related self-perceptions and dispositions” (Petrides and Furnham 2006), and can be measured by the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire Short Form (TEIQue-SF). The aims were to validate the Swedish version of TEIQue-SF by (1) investigating its internal consistency; (2) exploring its relationships with “Big Six” and “Dark Triad” personality traits as well as with self-perceived individual work performance; and (3) identifying which personality traits best explain variations in Trait EI, and whether this trait can predict variations in work performance over and above personality traits. Multi-occupational employees in Sweden (N = 228; M = 34 years, SD = 12.6, range 16-71 years, 66% women) with an average work experience of 14 years (SD = 11.5) were surveyed. In line with past research, internal consistency of TEIQue-SF was good, for the global Trait EI scale score (.86), and for one of its subdimensions (Well-Being) (.81). Global trait EI scale score and its subscales correlated negatively with Neuroticism and Machiavellianism, and positively with Extraversion, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Openness to Experience, and Narcissism. Sociability and Self-Control had, however, almost zero correlations with Machiavellianism. All subscales of global trait EI scale score correlated positively with Task Performance and Contextual Performance. On separate regression analyses, Big Six traits explained 48%, and Narcissism 14%, of the variation in global trait EI scale score. Trait EI accounted for a significantly larger proportion of the variation in Contextual Performance than any of the Big Six traits, and an additional 6% of the variation in Task Performance when controlling for gender, age, Neuroticism and Conscientiousness. The Swedish version of TEIQue-SF has good reliability as a global trait EI scale, reasonably theoretically and empirically grounded relationships with relevant variables for the workplace, and incremental validity over and above Big Six traits in predicting work performance in younger people with relatively high educational levels. Its reliability on the subscale level and its item functioning need to be further investigated in more heterogeneous samples.

  • 4.
    Kajonius, Petri
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. University of Gothenburg, Department of Psychology, Göteborg, Sweden. University of Skövde,Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Skövde, Sweden.
    Björkman, Therese
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Dark malevolent traits and everyday perceived stress2020In: Current Psychology, ISSN 1046-1310, E-ISSN 1936-4733, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 2351-2356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stress is a factor that greatly impacts our lives. Previous research has examined individual differences in relation to stress. However, research regarding malevolent personality traits in relation to how stress is perceived is limited. The purpose of the present study was to investigate relationships between dark malevolent personality traits; psychopathy (EPA), Machiavellianism (MACH-IV), vulnerable narcissism (HSNS), grandiose narcissism (NPI-13), and perceived stress (PSS-10) in a community sample (N = 346). The results showed a strong positive relationship between vulnerable narcissism and perceived stress, while grandiose narcissism and psychopathy showed a small negative relationship with perceived stress. The discussion centers on that narcissism should be treated as two separate traits, and that psychopathy and Machiavellianism overlap in relation to the experience of stress in everyday life.

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  • 5.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (SWE).
    Andersson, Lisa
    Department of Social Work, Malmö University, Malmö (SWE).
    Svensson, Robert
    Department of Criminology, Malmö University (SWE).
    Johnson, Björn
    School of Social Work, Lund University, Lund (SWE).
    Validation of the Super-Brief Pathological Narcissism Inventory (SB-PNI) among Swedish adolescents2024In: Current Psychology, ISSN 1046-1310, E-ISSN 1936-4733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the psychometric structure and properties of the Swedish version of the Super-Brief Pathological Narcissism Inventory (SB-PNI) among adolescents. In order to ensure the validity and feasibility of the measure, we examined the factor structure, measurement invariance across gender, age and ethnicity, and construct validity in relation to a number of correlates of narcissism in adolescence. Data were drawn from a large cross-sectional survey conducted in 35 schools in southern Sweden. The sample consisted of N = 5313 adolescents (Mage = 16.10 SD = 1.55) with 52.2% girls, 45.9% boys and 1.8% adolescents with unspecified gender, from compulsory and upper secondary schools in southern Sweden. The results showed that the measure holds a two-factor structure, suggesting the use of the subscales grandiosity and vulnerability separately, rather than as a unidimensional measure. The correlated factors grandiosity and vulnerability yielded full configural and metric invariance across gender, age, and ethnicity. Both grandiosity and vulnerability were correlated with externalizing and internalizing symptoms, as well as with low self-esteem. The study provides evidence for the utility of the SB-PNI among Swedish adolescents and indicates that the measure can be used across male and female adolescents of different ages and ethnic groups. 

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  • 6.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Jönköping University, Jönköping, 553 18, Sweden.
    Boson, Karin
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Psychology,Gothenburg.
    Discrepancies in parents' and adolescents' reports on parent-adolescent communication and associations to adolescents' psychological health2020In: Current Psychology, ISSN 1046-1310, E-ISSN 1936-4733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parental knowledge of adolescents’ whereabouts is central for healthy adolescent development. However, parents and their adolescent children often perceive parenting practices differently. Using data from matching parent and adolescent dyads (n = 477) from the longitudinal research program LoRDIA, we investigated in what way disagreement between parents’ and adolescents’ reports on parental knowledge, solicitation and behavioral control and adolescent disclosure, is longitudinally related to girls’ and boys’ psychological problems (internalizing and externalizing) and well-being. The adolescents’ mean age was 13.0 years (SD = .56) at T1 and 14.30 years (SD = .61) at T2, evenly distributed between boys (52.6%) and (47.4%) girls at baseline. The discrepancy scores were calculated by subtracting the adolescent’s scores from the parent’s scores. Parent-adolescent discrepancies had somewhat different patterns of associations with boys’ and girls’ psychological problems and well-being. Parental knowledge discrepancy was related to higher levels of girls’ externalizing problems while parental solicitation discrepancy was related to higher levels of boys’ externalizing problems and lower levels of girls’ wellbeing. Adolescent disclosure discrepancy was related to higher levels of girls’ internalizing problems and lower levels of well-being. Negative concurrent associations were shown between parental control discrepancy and adolescents’ internalizing problems. Parents’ overestimating the level of parent-adolescent communication, including adolescent disclosure, and parental solicitation in particular, is disadvantageous for adolescent psychological health. © 2020, The Author(s).

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1 - 6 of 6
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