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  • 1.
    Augustsson, Jens
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Holm, Alexis
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Framtidens konsumtion av digitala tjänster: En studie kring bruk av digitala tjänster på mobila enheter, baserat på ett Smart City-perspektiv.2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to find out how mobile user habits can provide a basis for applications and services based on a Smart City perspective, this by using two scientific methods, interviews and user diaries. The study will also analyze and develop the method for further studies in this subject. The cell phone has in recent years evolved into a unit where the original phone functions and features have become secondary. Even though its main purpose is still to communicate with others, it’s now done primarily through other types of services. Today the development goes from a use of digital services where each unit has a specific purpose, to a practise where they work together and share a common purpose. As a result of the fact that our use and our habits of these devices are changing, the nature of the services provided by these devices are also changing. Due to this, there is an ongoing evolution towards, and a demand for, new services that can take advantage of new technologies to dissolve the border between the digital and the physical reality. Which, from a Smart City perspective, could have great potential in several areas of social and organizational development.

    One can also se that the way we consume digital services is changing. We have gone from having a device centerd focus, were every unit has a specific purpose to a serviced centerd focus, were the units work as a collaborative ecosystem. These units share a collective pupose, to act as a window towards the internet.

  • 2.
    Broeren, Jurgen
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Jalminger, J
    Västra Götaland County.
    Johansson, L-Å
    Alkit Communications, Mölndal.
    Parmerud,, A
    Alkit Communications, Mölndal.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Rydmark, Martin
    Gothenburg University.
    Information and communication technology: a person-centered approach to stroke care2012In: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Disability, Virtual Reality and Associated Technologies / [ed] P M Sharkey, E Klinger, Readings: University of Readings , 2012, p. 329-335Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report describes the possibilities of information and communication technology (ICT) in stroke care, addressing a person-centered care (PCC) approach. Attention is paid to user involvement, design, videogames, and communication between health care professionals mutually as well as with patients, and how to share performance data with an electronic health record. This is the first step towards a supportive ICT system that facilitates interoperability, making healthcare information and services available to citizen’s across organizational boundaries. 

  • 3.
    Gustavsson Christiernin, Linn
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production System.
    Augustsson, Svante
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production System.
    Interacting with Industrial Robots: A Motion-based Interface2016In: AVI '16 Proceedings of the International Working Conference on Advanced Visual Interfaces / [ed] Paolo Buono, Rosa Lanzilotti, Maristella Matera, New York: ACM Digital Library, 2016, p. 310-311Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative industrial robot cells are becoming more and more interesting for industry through the new Industrie 4.0 initiative. In this paper we report early work on motion-based interaction with industrial robots. Human motion is tracked by a Kinect camera and translated into robot code. A group of tests subjects are asked to interact with the system and their activities are observed. Lessons learned on interaction challenges in a robot cell are reported.

  • 4.
    Hussain, Dena
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Computer, Electrical and Surveying Engineering.
    ICTs and sustainable management in cases of special need children: An early research case study2016In: 2016 IEEE Global Engineering Education Conference (EDUCON), IEEE, 2016, p. 997-1002Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As modern information and communication technologies (ICT) offer new possibilities for improving different aspect of healthcare, their implementation is a very relevant and is a fast accelerating process. The objective of this research is to identify the relationship between the use of Information and Communication Technologies for sustainable communication in the healthcare sector and examining the impact of using ICTs tool in a sustainable healthcare environment. This research is motivated by the need to develop better approaches in regards to healthcare services, creating optimized action plans for the development of sustainable processes in the healthcare sector in relation to process involving caretakers of disabled children in Sweden.

  • 5.
    Jobe, William
    et al.
    Stocholm Universitet, DSV.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Designing the CloudBoard: an innovative tool for collaborative e-learning environments using HTML52011In: Proceedings of IRIS 2011: TUCS Lecture Notes No 15, October 2011. / [ed] Leino, Timo, Turku: Turku Centre for Computer Science , 2011, p. 327-338Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to summarize the concepts of e-learning, LMS/VLE and cloud-based computing and present how the use of these technologies trends towards collaboration and interactive multimedia. Another purpose is to define and explain this trend in e-learning environments and technologies by presenting research grounded in constructivist learning theory. Subsequently, this paper summarizes the current situation of online whiteboard tools and the new HTML5 standard and key attributes. Next, this paper outlines how an open HTML5 solution for a collaborative, cloud-based, online whiteboard can improve accessibility, performance, collaboration, and security plus offer enhanced multimedia opportunities. Finally, this paper concludes with a presentation of an early prototype of an open, cloud-based online whiteboard, an e-learning cloudboard, which utilizes the advancements found in HTML5 and modern JavaScript libraries such as JQuery.

  • 6.
    Jobe, William
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Designing the CloudBoard: an innovative tool for collaborative e-learning environments using HTML52011In: Proceedings of 24th ICDE World Conference 2011, Universitas Terbuka , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to summarize the concepts of e-learning, LMS/VLE and cloud-based computing and present how the use of these technologies trends towards collaboration and interactive multimedia. Another purpose is to define and explain this trend in e-learning environments and technologies by presenting research grounded in constructivist learning theory. Subsequently, this paper summarizes the current situation of online whiteboard tools and the new HTML5 standard and key attributes. Next, this paper outlines how an open HTML5 solution for a collaborative, cloud-based, online whiteboard can improve accessibility, performance, collaboration, and security plus offer enhanced multimedia opportunities. Finally, this paper concludes with a presentation of an early prototype of an open, cloud-based online whiteboard, an e-learning cloudboard, which utilizes the advancements found in HTML5 and modern JavaScript libraries such as JQuery. 

  • 7.
    Johansson, Lars-Olof
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    A Boundary Practice Perspective on Co-creation of ICT Innovations2016In: Nordic Contributions in IS Research: 7th Scandinavian Conference on Information Systems, SCIS 2016 and IFIP8.6 2016, Ljungskile, Sweden, August 7-10, 2016, Proceedings / [ed] Ulrika Lundh Snis, Springer Publishing Company, 2016, Vol. 259, p. 100-115Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has shown that collaboration and co-creation among different groups of stakeholders add complexity and challenges to the innovation process. In this paper a study of co-creation in a multi-stakeholder innovation process is presented. The co-creation is explored and described from a boundary practice perspective. The empirical data presented in the study is based on a user-centric innovation project, Free2Ride, where researchers, developers and members of two equestrian clubs co-created a piece of ICT safety equipment consisting of a transmitter (on the horse) and a receiver (application on a smartphone) to be used by equestrian club members during their everyday riding activities. Three episodes were extracted from the empirical data and presented in the paper. From these episodes the researchers have identified four characteristics of the spanning of boundaries in co-creation from a boundary practice perspective. One of the contributions in the papers is a description of boundary practice-spanning. The research approach adopted in the study is the action case approach.

  • 8.
    Ljungdahl Eriksson, Martin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Sound Bubbles for Productive Office Work2016In: Nordic Contributions in IS Research: 7th Scandinavian Conference on Information Systems, SCIS 2016 and IFIP8.6 2016, Ljungskile, Sweden, August 7-10, 2016, Proceedings / [ed] Ulrika Lundh Snis, Cham: Springer International Publishing , 2016, Vol. 259, p. 29-42Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing number of organizations are moving towards more open and collaborative workplaces. In these offices workers share a common open space, often with flexible seating based on activities, so called activity-based offices. Most problems in these workplaces are related to sound. Thus, the question of how to design suitable acoustic environments, supporting both collaborative and individual work, has emerged. Noise-reduction approaches do not suffice. In this study we explored the possibility of adding context-sensitive, activity-based sound environments to enhance the office workplace. For this purpose, we developed the “sound bubble,” a prototype for individual work, sonically immersing the listener and generating a sensation of an encapsulating sonic environment. A total of 43 test subjects participated in an experience-based test using the sound bubble prototype while conducting self-selected, ordinary work tasks in their office landscape. Their behaviors during the test were observed and documented. All participants took a post-experience questionnaire about experiences working in the sound bubble, and two subjects were interviewed. The responses show that the sound bubble can enhance auditory work conditions for individual work that demands concentration.

  • 9.
    Ljungdahl Eriksson, Martin
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Atienza, Ricardo
    Konstfack, University College of Arts, Crafts and Design 126 27 Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Sound Bubble: An Aesthetic Additive Design Approach to Actively Enhance Acoustic Office Environments2016In: Proceedings of 13th conference on Sound and Music Computing, Hamburg 2016, 2016, p. 253-260Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Moving towards more open and collaborative workplaces has been an emerging trend in the last decades. This change has led to workers sharing a common open space, with seating’s based on current activity, so called activity-based offices. Consequently, it becomes difficult to design sonic environments that cater to different needs in the same space. In this study we explored the possibility of adding site-specific but location-adaptive sound environments to enhance the experience of an activity-based office workplace. For this purpose, we developed the concept of the “sound bubble,” a micro-space in which the user is embedded by a semi-transparent sound environment. The purpose of the bubble is to help the user ignore irrelevant and disturbing noise while working in an open landscape. The sound bubble supports the user to stay in “everyday listening” mode, i.e., not focusing on anything particular in the surrounding environment while being able to keep a link with it. The sound bubble was evaluated by a total of 43 test subjects participating in an experience-based test, conducting their usual work tasks in an office landscape. Our results show that the sound bubble can enhance auditory work conditions for individual work requiring concentration.

  • 10.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Hattinger, Monika
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Bernhardsson, Lennarth
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Pongolini, Malin
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Designing the CloudBoard: an ICT Tool for Online Tutoring in Higher Education2011In: Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2011 / [ed] Matthew Koehler & Punya Mishra, Chesapeake, VA: AACE , 2011, p. 589-592Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper concerns online tutoring in higher education. Observation studies of online tutoring sessions in two masters level engineering courses were conducted where teachers on campus tutored students located at different manufacturing plants doing their masters project. The tutoring regarded problems surrounding the construction of advanced 3D-models for manufacturing and required the shared view of the 3D-models as well as synchronous voice communication, e-mail and image sharing using a flora of different services. While advanced screen sharing applications like WebEX and TeamViewer were central in the tutoring sessions, the research presented here focus on the tools that supplemented the use of the screen sharing applications. Addressing issues such as the need to record historical data to be able for teachers to follow the progression of the project, sharing media files between participants and discussing the results, we here present a system to support online tutoring in higher education.

  • 11.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    A Teachable Agent Game Engaging Primary School Children to Learn Arithmetic Concepts and Reasoning2014In: International Journal of Artificial Intelligence in Education, ISSN 1560-4292, E-ISSN 1560-4306, ISSN 1560-4292, 1560-4306, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 251-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we will describe a learning environment designed to foster conceptual understanding and reasoning in mathematics among younger school children. The learning environment consists of 48 2-player game variants based on a graphical model of arithmetic where the mathematical content is intrinsically interwoven with the game idea. The environment also features teachable agents, which are computer programs that can be taught and behave according to their knowledge. Thus, the environment provides both learning-by-doing (playing the game) and learning-by-teaching (teaching the agent to play). It differs from other learning-by-teaching systems 1) by targeting basic mathematics and primary grade students; 2) by using teachable agents as an extension to educational games in order to leverage engagement, reflection and learning; and 3) by using an agent-driven question dialogue to challenge students’ mathematical thinking, to role-model learner behaviour and to transfer game knowledge to out-of-game mathematics. The teachable agent game is described and evaluated in an authentic classroom study enrolling 443 students from 22 classes in 9 schools. Students range from 2nd to 6th grade of mainstream classes and 7th to 8th grade for students with difficulties in mathematics. Part of the study was designed as a quasiexperimental study with controls; part was designed to examine students’ change in mental models of arithmetic before and after game play. All students took pre- and post mathematics tests. The 314 playing students used the game and taught their agents during regular math-classes for three months, whereas the control classes attended standard instruction and took the tests. A questionnaire was distributed at the end of the study to investigate students’ perceptions and performances of the agent-tutoring task. Results show that 1) there is a significant learning gain for playing students compared to controls, 2) the learning environment can engage children in advanced mathematical thinking in early education, 3) young primary students can act as successful tutors. Thus, we conclude that teachable agents in educational games can help achieve deeper levels of learning that transfer outside the game. This idea combines the motivational power of games with the reflective power of a teachable agent asking thought-provoking, deep questions on the learning material during game play.

  • 12.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Mathematical literacy for everyone using arithmetic games2012In: In Proceedings of the 9th International Confernce on Disability, Virtual Reality and Associated Technologies / [ed] P M Sharkey, E Klinger, Readings: University of Readings , 2012, p. 87-96Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An innovative mathematics game shown to be effective for low-achieving mainstream students is tested in special education for learners with intellectual disabilities. The game relies on a graphical, intuitive representation for numbers and arithmetic operations to foster conceptual understanding and numbers sense, and provides a set of 2-player games to develop strategic thinking and reasoning skills.  The game runs on computers and interactive white boards, and as an augmented reality application at a science centre. We compare its use in special education and mainstream education with respect to usage, performance levels and learning gain. The game has been used by teachers in special educations, with gains in mathematical understanding, strategic thinking and communication skills as effects.

  • 13.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Mathematical Literacy for Everyone using Arithmetic Games2014In: International Journal of Child Health and Human Development, ISSN 1939-5965, ISSN 1939-5965, Vol. 7, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An innovative mathematics game shown to be effective for low-achieving mainstream students is tested in special education for learners with moderate or severe intellectual disabilities in Sweden, to investigate if the game also can be effective for this group of students. The game relies on a graphical, intuitive representation for numbers and arithmetic operations to foster conceptual understanding and numbers sense, and provides a set of 2-player games to develop strategic thinking and reasoning skills.  The game runs on computers and interactive white boards, and as an augmented reality application at a science centre. The study enrolled 3 teachers and 8 students in 5th to 8th grade with intellectual disabilities who played the game between 4 months and 2 years, one student with Asperger syndrome, and over 300 students in mainstream education as comparison. We compare the use of the game in special education and mainstream education with respect to usage, performance levels and learning gains. Collected data include game playing logs for all students where playing behaviour, performance and progression data was analysed; class room and science centre observations where interaction, collaboration and communication was analysed, and on in-depth interviews with the teachers. Conclusion is that the game in combination with dedicated teachers can be very effective for students with intellectual disabilities, and can result in substantial gains in mathematical understanding and strategic thinking as well as in communication skills, given time and proper support.

  • 14.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Robot As Tutee2017In: Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing, ISSN 2194-5357, E-ISSN 2194-5365, Vol. 457, p. 271-277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the possible advantages of substituting teachable agents in a learning environment, with a humanoid robot as the non-human tutee. Teachable agents are used as an extension to educational games in order to leverage engagement, reflection and learning. The learning environment is engaging and shown to be effective for learning and promote self-efficacy in experimental studies in authentic classroom settings. Features beneficial for learning which are further enhanced by a robot compared to an agent are identified. These include embodiment of the robot; a social, empathic behaviour, better conversational abilities which together provide a better role model of an ideal learner for the student to identify with.

  • 15.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Sharkey, Paul M.School of Systems Engineering, University of Reading, United Kingdom.Merrick, JoavNational Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Technology, Rehabilitation and Empowerment of People with Special Needs2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Sharkey, PaulSchool of Systems Engineering, University of Reading, United Kingdom.Merrick, JoavNational Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Jerusalem, Israel.
    International Journal of Journal of Child Development: Special Issue: Using technology to enhance rehabilitation and empower people with special needs2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Sharkey, Paul
    University of Reading, School of Systems Engineering, United Kingdom.
    Merrick, Joav
    National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Introduction: Using technology to enhance rehabilitation and empower people with special needs2015In: Technology, Rehabilitation and Empowerment of People with Special Needs, Nova Science Publishers, Inc. , 2015, p. xi-xiiiChapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Sharkey, PaulSchool of Systems Engineering, University of Reading, United Kingdom.Merrick, JoavNational Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Journal of Pain Management: Special issue: Using virtual reality technologies to support everyday rehabilitation2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Spante, Maria
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Willermark, Sara
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Challenges of Implementing Interactivity in the Classroom2014In: IRIS  Proceedings: Proceedings of the 37th Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia (IRIS 37) / [ed] Ahmad Ghazawneh, Jacob Nørbjerg and Jan Pries-Heje, Ringsted, Denmark,, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitalization of schools has been on the agenda for decades and has resulted in new demands on teachers' skills in order to implememt technology into teaching. Despite political reforms, investments in technology and continuing professional development (CPD) initiatives for teachers, research often shows slow changes and unequal implementation. This paper addresses the challenges teachers are facing when participating in a 2-year CPD project using a highly interactive technology in classroom settings. The study is based on 18 in-depth interviwes and 6 video recalled observation sessions. The results show how the actual classroom situation is being very intense for the teacher in their everyday work. We conclude that for teachers to transform their teaching practices using highly interactive ICT-based learning is associated with several challenges related to planning and execution, for the part of the teachers, at the same time as it can be beneficial for student learning.

  • 20.
    Rawshani, Araz
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Medicine, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Rawshani, Nina
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Medicine, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Gelang, Carita
    The Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Jan-Otto
    The Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Larsson, Anna
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Medicine, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Bång, Angela
    University College of Borås, The Pre-hospital Research Centre of Western Sweden, Prehospen, Borås, Sweden.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University College of Borås, The Pre-hospital Research Centre of Western Sweden, Prehospen, Borås, Sweden.
    Gellerstedt, Martin
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Emergency medical dispatch priority in chest pain patients due to life threatening conditions: A cohort study examining circadian variations and impact of the education2017In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 236, no I June, p. 43-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: We examined the accuracy in assessments of emergency dispatchers according to their education and time of the day. We examined this in chest pain patients who were diagnosed with a potentially life-threatening condition (LTC) or died within 30 days. Methods: Among 2205 persons, 482 died, 1631 experienced an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), 1914 had a LTC.Multivariable logistic regression was used to study how time of the call and the dispatcher's education were associated with the risk of missing to give priority 1 (the highest). Results: Among patients who died, a 7-fold increase in odds of missing to give priority 1 was noted at 1.00 pm, as compared with midnight. Compared with assistant nurses, odds ratio for dispatchers with no (medical) training was 0.34 (95% CI 0.14 to 0.77). Among patients with an ACS, odds ratio for calls arriving before lunch was 2.02 (95% CI 1.22 to 3.43), compared with midnight. Compared with assistant nurses, odds ratio for operators with no training was 0.23 (95% CI 0.13 to 0.40). Similar associations were noted for those with any LTC. Dispatcher's education was not associated with the patient's survival. Conclusions: In this group of patients, which experience substantial mortality and morbidity, the risk of not obtaining highest dispatch priority was increased up to 7-fold during lunchtime. Dispatch operators without medical education had the lowest risk, compared with nurses and assistant nurses, of missing to give priority 1, at the expense of lower positive predictive value. Key messages: What is already known about this subject? Use of the emergency medical service (EMS) increases survival among patients with acute coronary syndromes. It is unknown whether the efficiency – as judged by the ability to identify life-threatening cases among patients with chest pain – varies according to the dispatcher's educational level and the time of day.What does this study add? We provide evidence that the dispatcher's education does not influence survival among patients calling the EMS due to chest discomfort. However, medically educated dispatchers are at greatest risk of missing to identify life threatening cases, which is explained by more parsimonious use of the highest dispatch priority. We also show that the risk of missing life-threatening cases is at highest around lunch time.How might this impact on clinical practice? Dispatch centers are operated differently all over the world and chest discomfort is one of the most frequent symptoms encountered; we provide evidence that it is safe to operate a dispatch center without medically trained personnel, who actually miss fewer cases of acute coronary syndromes. However, non-medically trained dispatchers consume more pre-hospital resources.

  • 21.
    Sofkova Hashemi, Sylvana
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Wiki-mediated Writing: design, media, writing strategies and feedback in online text production2013In: Acta Didactica Norge - tidsskrift for fagdidaktisk forsknings- og utviklingsarbeid i Norge, ISSN 1504-9922, E-ISSN 1504-9922, Vol. 7, no 1, p. Art. 8 : 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bringing social media arenas, such as wikis, into the classroom invites teaching approaches that engage students in authentic, participatory and creative writing processes. This case study examines the online text production of primary school students in a wiki environment and how the key functionalities for commentary, discussion, logging skills of text and multimodal expression are utilized in practice to develop writing. Exploring the design of assignments and analysing the nature of final texts, writing strategies and feedback reveals an iterative process of writing dominated by strategies of expanding texts with new information and occasional surface editing. The students composed individual narratives on selected themes augmented by drawings, images, speaking avatars and video clips. Feedback was mainly provided by the teachers in the form of encouraging comments and corrective revisions directly in the students’ texts. Peer response was rare, in one project taking the form of discussion posts. Revising indicating increased language awareness was observed among second language learners. Overall, the study demonstrates a tension between instructional design, the affordances of the writing arena and the space for creativity when engaging students in advanced, participatory and reflective composing and revising of texts. 

  • 22.
    Willermark, Sara
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Challenges of Achieving ICT Competent Teachers through Continuing Professional Development: Teachers' perspectives2013In: Proceedings IRIS36: August 11-14 2013 at Gran, Norway, University of Oslo, department of informatics / [ed] Tone Bratteteig, Margunn Aanestad & Espen Skorve, Oslo: Akademika forlag, 2013, no 4, p. 103-117Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the problem of how to reach an Information and Communication Technology (ICT) competent teaching faculty in Swedish compulsory school.  Continuing professional development (CPD) is often used as a mean to increase competence in general among teachers, and is used for ICT initiatives as well. However, numerous studies have shown that previous ICT initiatives have not achieved sustainable change in teaching practices to the extend desired by policymakers. This study addresses the problem by investigating how such change initiatives can affect teachers in their every-day work. Therefore, we explore challenges and experiences, as perceived by teachers, related to CPD as a mean to achieve ICT competence into their profession. 17 teachers have been interviewed. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analysed by learning theories suitable for professional practices. Teachers’ expressed needs were well aligned with CPD methods advocated in research literature, but less aligned with previous CPD initiatives. Their expressed needs were diverse, reflecting their individual competence, length of teaching experience, personal motivation and learning preferences. 

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