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  • 1.
    Assmo, Per
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    A Time-geographic Appraisal for Local Sustainable Development2015In: International Journal of Environmental, Cultural, Economic and Social Sustainability, ISSN 1832-2077, Vol. 10, p. 15-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable development is often described as including ecological, social and economic dimensions. The conventional view of "sustainable" development is largely based on ideas of economic growth, which promotes expansion in space and compression in time – what we call a global market economy. Furthermore, the dominant conventional view also enhances a technical-economic approach that results in a rather narrow subject specific research focus on specific problems. Thereto connected strategies thereby use general technological and institutional policies and solutions that tend to conceal the reality of how people act and respond in relation to resources and constraints in a time-spatial context. So, the conventional development perspective seems in many ways to be unsustainable in ecological, social and thereby also economic terms. This article is of a conceptual character and focuses on local development in a time-space context. The article is inspired by Hägerstrand's time-geographical approach, and explores an approach that contextualizes processes of change in time and space. This time-spatial approach thereby enhances an alternative view for integrated local social-, economic- and ecological sustainable development processes. In so doing, this approach has the potential to enhance a more all-embracing sustainable development approach applicable to design local policy instruments and strategies.This article is of a conceptual character and focuses on local development in a time-space context. The article is inspired by Hägerstrand's time-geographical approach, and explores an approach that contextualizes processes of change in time and space. This time-spatial approach thereby enhances an alternative view for integrated local social-, economic- and ecological sustainable development processes. In so doing, this approach has the potential to enhance a more all-embracing sustainable development approach applicable to design local policy instruments and strategies.

  • 2.
    Assmo, Per
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Law, Politics and Economics.
    Creative Industry Cluster Growth for Regional Development: Illustrations from Sweden2008In: Uddevalla Symposium 2008: Spatial Dispersed Production and Network Governance : Revised papers presented at the 11th Uddevalla Symposium, 15-17 May, 2008, Kyoto, Japan  / [ed] Iréne Bernhard, Trollhättan: University West , 2008, p. 99-113Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To survive and thrive in market economy, actors seek for continuous increased productivity and effectiveness. To do so, there is a dominant argument that concentration or clustering of economic activities might enhance economic performance and growth. In an increasingly global market, knowledge and creativity are often highlighted as increasingly important factors for economic growth in post-industrial societies. Changes in the economic landscape mean that the location of human capacity becomees a key aspect for knowledge creation and regional economic growth, especially for the development of the creative industry. In many EU countries, political institutions at various levels strive to assist the growth of, or even develop creative economic clusters. But is it possible, through political means, to actually construct a flourishing and sustainable creative industry clusters? And if so, is it possible to attract and/or develop the creative capital, the essential element for the development and growth of the creative industry. The article aims to critically discuss and further develop the conceptual discussion of creative capital, its relation in time and space, and thereby impact on regional economic growth. In an attempt to take the theoretical discussion a step forward, the creative capital theory will be critically analysed, where the author apply comparative studies to examine the impact of creative capital at national, regional and local level in a time-spatial context.  

  • 3.
    Assmo, Per
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Fox, Roddy
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    International collaboration for pedagogical innovation: Understanding multiracial interaction through a time-geographic appraisal2015In: Knowledge for a sustainable world: A southern African–Nordic contribution / [ed] Tor Halvorsen, Hilde Ibsen and Vyvienne RP M’kumbuzi, Cape Town: African Minds, 2015, p. 207-226Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Assmo, Per
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Wihlborg, Elin
    Linköping University.
    An Alternative Time-Spatial Approach Towards Post-Monetarism2011In: Uddevalla Symposium 2010. Innovation and Multidimensional Entrepreneurship - Economic, Social and Academic Aspects : Revised papers presented at the 13th Uddevalla Symposium, 19-22 August, 2010, Jönköping, Sweden  / [ed] Irene Bernhard, Trollhättan: University West , 2011, p. 71-84Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Assmo, Per
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Law, Politics and Economics.
    Wihlborg, Elin
    Linköping University.
    Home: The Arena for Sustainable Development: A Conceptual Discussion2009In: Uddevalla Symposium 2009: The Geography of Innovation and Entrepreneurship: Revised papers presented at the 12th Uddevalla Symposium, 11-13 June, 2009, Bari, Italy / [ed] Iréne Bernhard, Trollhättan: University West , 2009, p. 91-105Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In contemporary society, environmental problems are most often regarded as global phenomena that require international attention and solutions. However, global environmental problems can be regarded as symptoms and results of people´s daily activities at a local level where, the focus is on the household, defined as a space where individuals live together, where everyday life is organised and takes place. Interpretations and analyses of households and everyday life vary in different academic disciplinary contexts. Even in everyday language, different meanings are attributed to the term. The aim of this paper is to distinguish between, and discuss, understandings of the household as a physical dwelling, as a node of economic resource management, and finally as a social and emotional space. These three dimensions of everyday life are related to the three dimensions of sustainable development and an analysis that can indentify and integrate these dimensions can provide openings to enhance sustainable development processes combining the local and the global.

  • 6.
    Assmo, Per
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Wihlborg, Elin
    Local alternative development through a time-spatial lens: A case study of Ydre inspired by Hägerstrand2012In: Entrepreneurship, Social Capital And Governance: Directions for the Sustainable Development and Competitiveness of Regions / [ed] Charlie Karlsson, Börje Johansson, Roger R Stough, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2012, p. 378-391Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the contemporary market-oriented society, we seem to be more globally interdependent. The market economy system enhances large-scale production where search for increased productivity strives to 'compress' time. At the same time, the market economy tends to expand in space, for example sells products over longer distances. A result of this 'space expansion' and 'time compression' through the conventional economic market system is that local small-scale production and trade have increasing difficulty in competing and surviving (Assmo and Wihlborg, 2007). Even so, conventional economic growth (valued in monetary terms) is commonly seen as the only way to cure any development problem arising from poverty, unemployment, crime, pollution and depletion of natural resources. In a provocative manner similar to Daly (1992), one can argue that this conventional monetary valued growth perspective is trapped in a terminal state of 'growthmania'. People's organization of daily activities to improve or sustain their livelihood is much more than what is generally calculated and thereby shown in monetary values.

  • 7.
    Assmo, Per
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Wihlborg, Elin
    Political entrepreneurship and sustainable growth in rural areas2016In: Political Entrepreneurship: Regional Growth and Entrepreneurial Diversity in Sweden / [ed] Charlie Karlsson, Charlotte Silander and Daniel Silander, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016, p. 83-98Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Political entrepreneurs in local rural settings play a partly different, but still crucial role for local development. Here the prospects for development are more constrained: there are fewer resources and people, but mainly because of a limited local market and transportation constraints. Thus, political entrepreneurs have to use specific time-spatial power strategies to make changes. However, the concept of political entrepreneur includes a variety of roles, actions and characteristics. We will thus elaborate on the meaning of political entrepreneurs in their local time-spatial setting of rural communities. If local political entrepreneurs are to become crucial actors in policy-making and local development, we have to get to know them and no longer consider them as anomalies in the policy process and use them for improved local development. This chapter contributes in three ways to the general aim of the book to show the role that the political entrepreneur might play in promoting entrepreneurship, enterprise and entrepreneurial diversity. First, we will show the importance of the time-spatial setting of the political entrepreneur by using a time-geographical approach. Second, we elaborate on different types of political entrepreneurs. Finally, we will show how differently political entrepreneurs can promote local development by presenting three illustrations based on extensive bottom-up qualitative field studies.

  • 8.
    Assmo, Per
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Law, Politics and Economics.
    Wihlborg, Elin
    Linköping University.
    Turning Time-Spatial Modes: An Alternative Perspective to Integrate Environmental-economic Processes of Change2008In: Uddevalla Symposium 2008: Spatial Dispersed Production and Network Governance : Revised papers presented at the 11th Uddevalla Symposium, 15-17 May, 2008, Kyoto, Japan  / [ed] Iréne Bernhard, Trollhättan: University West , 2008, p. 115-128Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global market economy is built on a political institutional arrangement promoting free and open trade. The existing natural and human resources make up the basis for all productive activities. The dominating economy strive to reach efficient use of human and natural resources, by enhancing processes of spatial expansion and time-compression.   The conceptual argument in this paper takes its starting point in Hägerstrand´s traditional time-space model. It illustrates two conflicting perspectives the global market economic horizontal norm (expansion in space, compression in time) and the environmental sustainable vertical processes (expansion over time in limited spaces). These two norms head in different directions and environmental sustainability is therefore conflicting with the common meaning of economic development.   In a time-spatial perspective, a sustainable use of resources is spatially limited, and extended over time. A development process, in terms of environmental sustainability, relies on local resource use and extension in time, to limit the use of external input of energy. This process is the opposite to what today is seen as economic development (growth) that compresses time and expands in space, to reach the most favourable comparative advantages.    The monetary market economy is a political construction. What activities and resources that are given a price on the market depend on the istitutional arrangements of property rights, prices and legal structures. Our conceptual conclusion is that the current political construction of the economy is "in-complete" and thus creates and fosters a mis-match with environmental pre-conditions. The political system can have the capacity to use the tools and power to harmonise economic development with environmental sustainability, locally, nationally and globally.

  • 9.
    Assmo, Per
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Wilhborg, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering.
    Local Policy Entrepreneurs and Sustainable Development in Rural Areas2015In: Uddevalla Symposium 2015. Regional Development in an International Context. Regional, National, Cross Border and International Factors for Growth and Development: Revised papers presented at the 18th Uddevalla Symposium, 11-13 June, Sönderborg, Denmark / [ed] Iréne Bernhard, Trollhättan: University West , 2015, p. 59-74Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Balalia, Alina
    et al.
    Academy of Economic Studies in Bucharest.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan.
    Assessing TerritorialImpact Assessment: the Case of Services of General Interest2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Humer, Alois
    et al.
    University of Vienna, Dept. of Geography.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan.
    Marques da Costa, Nuno
    University of Lisbon, Centre for Geographical Studies.
    Towards a Welfare Typology in the ESPON Space.2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Iosif, Alina Elena
    et al.
    Economic University of Bucharest, Romania.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Assessing Territorial Impact Assessment: The Case Of Services Of General Interest2013In: Romanian Journal of Regional Science, ISSN 1843-8520, E-ISSN 1843-8520, Vol. 7, no June 15, p. 66-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    No single or common definition, or even a shared basic understanding, of Territorial Impact Assessment (TIA) currently exists. The conceptual background of TIA is focused on Territorial Cohesion (TC), which, in turn, also lacks a single definition. TC has a strong connection to Services of General Interest (SGI) as these services are a crucial element of the Cohesion Policy. This paper is a spin-off from the ESPON SeGI project and aims to discuss the applicability of TIA on SGI. The analysis is focused on an ex ante evaluation of TIA and on the methodology of critical evaluation. The findings suggest a rather limited applicability as an undefined concept (TIA) is based on another undefined concept (TC) to measure the impact on a third vaguely defined concept (SGI). Moreover, the particularities of each SGI may be related to economic and social changes that themselves may or may not be territorially reflected.

  • 13.
    Johansson, Mats
    et al.
    Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan.
    Young Women on the Run?: A Snapshot from Rural Sweden.2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Kompaniets, Olga
    et al.
    Moscow State University of Economics, Statistics and Informatics (MESI).
    Rauhut, Daniel
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    The Place Marketing Concept of Rural Municipalities in Northern Sweden: a Content Analysis of the Municipals' Homepages2013In: Romanian Journal of Regional Science, ISSN 1843-8520, E-ISSN 1843-8520, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 11-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The place marketing concept is one of the most popular concepts used in the analysis and promotion of countries, regions, cities and towns. The intensification of competition for investment, tourism and human resources among European cities and towns has increased the importance of being unique. Most studies on place marketing focus on unique selling points and thus on brands of already extensively 'marketed' countries, national capitals and other large metropolitan areas, while the rural towns that need more marketing attention, given their need to overcome their lack of material and non-material resources, are often ignored. This is based on the idea of the promotion to target markets of the unique selling points of the town in question. This paper aims to discuss the extent to which the place marketing concept can be viewed as an essential tool in the effective promotion of 75 rural towns in the seven northernmost regions of Sweden. The paper outlines the reasons why rural towns in Northern Sweden should use place marketing. The article also highlights the basic features of the place marketing concept and its key elements for rural towns as well as describing the target audience for rural towns while identifying their specific needs and wants.

  • 15.
    Kompaniets, Olga
    et al.
    Moscow State University of Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    The Place Marketing Conceptof Rural Towns in Northern Sweden: what is the Unique Selling Point?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The place marketing concept is one of the popular concepts to analyze and promote countries, regions, cities and towns. The intensification of competition for investment, tourism and human resources among European cities and towns has increased the importance of being unique. Most of studies on place marketing however focus on the unique selling points and brands of countries, the capitals and the big cities, while rural towns need more marketing attention due to overcoming the lack of material and non-material resources in the towns. This is based on the idea of promotion to target markets of unique selling point of the town.

    This paper aims to discuss to what extent the place marketing concept as a necessary condition for an effective promotion of 75 rural towns in the seven northernmost regions in Sweden. The paper presents reasons for using the place marketing concept by rural towns in Northern Sweden. Also it contains features of the place marketing concept and its key elements for rural towns, describes the target audience for rural towns with their specific needs and wants.

  • 16.
    Littke, Helene
    et al.
    Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan.
    Foss, Olaf
    Norsk Institut for By- og Regionalforskning.
    Services of General Interest and Regional Development in the ESPON Space2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Littke, Hélène
    et al.
    Kungliga tekniska högskolan, avd. Urbana och regionala studier.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Foss, Olaf
    Norsk Institutt för By og Regionalforskning.
    Services of general interest and regional development in the European Union2013In: Romanian Journal of Regional Science, ISSN 1843-8520, E-ISSN 1843-8520, Vol. 7, no June 15, p. 88-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims at comparing the scientific literature and key EU policy documents on the impact of services of general interest on regional development. The study proposes to answer two questions: (1) how do the scientific literature and EU policy documents differ in terms of which services of general interest are seen to have an impact on regional development and (2) why do they identify different services of general interest as important for regional development? The method used is qualitative discourse analysis.

    The results indicate that services of general interest have a rather different assumed impact on regional development in the scientific literature and in the key EU policy documents. Eight out of the fourteen services of general interest analysed in this study are either not mentioned at all or are only indirectly touched upon in the studied EU policy documents. The EU policy documents consider the drivers for regional development to be transport, ICT and telecommunications, electricity, education and health.

  • 18.
    Marques da Costa, Eduarda
    et al.
    University of Lisbon, Centre for Geographical Studies.
    Palma, Pedro
    University of Lisbon, Centre for Geographical Studies.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan.
    Humer, Alois
    University of Vienna, Dept. of Geography.
    Consantin, Daniela
    Academiy of Economic Studies in Bucharest.
    Velasco, Xabier
    NASUVINSA, Pamplona.
    Indicators of Services of General Interest in EU regional context: between the need tomeasure and the lack of usefulness2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Marques da Costa, Eduarda
    et al.
    University of Lisbon, Portugal.
    Palma, Pedro
    University of Lisbon, Portugal.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Humer, Alois
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Constantin, Daniela
    Economic University of Bucharest, Romania.
    Echerarría Velasco, Xabier
    Nasuvinsa, Pamplona, Spain.
    What indicators to use when measuring services of general interest?2013In: Europe XXI, ISSN 1429-7132, Vol. 23, p. 7-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The services of general interest (SGI) have received increasing attention of the European Union, which considers them a key element of the European model of society. They not only play an important role in the ongoing competitiveness of the European economy, but are also essential for achieving the goal of promoting social and territorial cohesion. Their potential role in the pursuit of the objectives of European cohesion and convergence policies may be significant which calls for an appropriate measurement and analysis of territorial distribution. The indicators are assumed to be a key element in measuring and describing the SGI, however, it is necessary to make a serious reflection how such indicators should be selected. The selection of indicators can be conditioned by several factors, however, it is imperative to make a qualitative reflection on the adequacy and relevance of indicators to analyse the SGI. This reflection runs through the paper. The concept of indicators is addressed, and their strengths and weaknesses are discussed. The indicators are classified according to the role they play in the cause-effect relations in distinct territories. Three types of indicators are identified. Appraisal of indicators and review of literature render it possible to identify the most frequently used indicators and to see SGI analysis from several perspectives, thus verifying that indicators can present different meanings and relevance, based on a range of factors and the scale of analysis. Some of the uncertainties arising in the SGI territorial analysis, which can contribute to the success of the policy making process, are recognized through an example based on the ICT Telecommunication SGI sub-domain. Some procedures connected with the integration of different types of indicators are proposed in order to limit the emergent uncertainties resulting from their interpretation

  • 20.
    Niedomysl, Thomas
    et al.
    Lund University, Department of Human and Economic Geography, Lund SE-223 62, Sweden.
    Hall, Ola
    Lund University, Department of Human and Economic Geography, Lund SE-223 62, Sweden.
    Archila Bustos, Maria Francisca
    Lund University, Department of Human and Economic Geography, Lund SE-223 62, Sweden.
    Ernstson, Ulf
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mathematics, Computer and Surveying Engineering. University of Gothenburg, Department of Economy and Society, .
    Using Satellite Data on Nighttime Lights Intensity to Estimate Contemporary Human Migration Distances2017In: Annals of the American Association of Geographers, ISSN 2469-4452, Vol. 107, no 3, p. 591-605Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For well over a century, migration researchers have recognized the lack of adequate distance measures to be a key obstacle for advancing understanding of internal migration. The problem arises from the convention of spatially defining migration as the crossing of administrative borders. Because administrative regions vary in size, shape, and settlement patterns, it is difficult to tell how far movers go, raising doubts about the generalizability of research in the field. This article shows that satellite data on nighttime lights can be used to infer accurate measures of migration distance. We first use the intensity of nighttime lights to locate mean population centers that closely correspond to mean population centers calculated from actual population data. Until now, locating mean population centers accurately has been problematic, as it has required highly disaggregated population data, which are lacking in many countries. The nighttime lights data, which are freely available on a yearly basis, solve this challenge. We then show that this information can be used to accurately estimate migration distances. © 2017 by American Association of Geographers.

  • 21.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan.
    Arbetskraftsinvandring... men varifrån?2003In: Nyheter & Debatt, no 3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Humer, Alois
    University of Vienna.
    Smith, Christoffer
    Nordregio.
    Is there a European Welfare Model?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Kahila, Petri
    Nordregio.
    Unemployment and Labour Market Institutions: A Cross-Section Analysis of Regional Data for EU and Norway 2005-20072013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    et al.
    Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan.
    Ludlow, David
    University of the West of England, Bristol.
    Services of General Interest and Territorial Cohesion: what, how and by whom?2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Wiest, Karin
    et al.
    Institut für Länderkunde, Leipzig.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies.
    Rural development, female mobility and the provision of SGI – a target group oriented approach.2013In: Second ESPON Scientific Report, Luxembourg, 2013, p. 61-67Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 25 of 25
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