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  • 1.
    André, Frida
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund (SWE).
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Einarsson, Isak
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund (SWE); Region Skane, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Regional Outpatient Care, Lund University Hospital, Lund (SWE).
    Trebbin Harvard, Sunna
    Civic Centre Children and Youth, The Social Services Administration, Copenhagen (DNK).
    Franzén, Leonard
    Social Services, Malmö (SWE).
    Möttus, Annika
    Region Skane, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Regional Outpatient Care, Lund University Hospital, Lund (SWE).
    Håkansson, Anders
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, (SWE); Region Skåne, Malmö Addiction Centre, Gambling Disorder Unit, Malmö (SWE).
    Claesdotter-Knutsson, Emma
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund (SWE); Region Skane, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Regional Outpatient Care, Lund University Hospital, Lund (SWE).
    Relapse prevention therapy for internet gaming disorder in Swedish child and adolescent psychiatric clinics: a randomized controlled trial2023In: Frontiers in Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1664-0640, Vol. 14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of relapse prevention (RP) as a treatment for internet gaming disorder (IGD).

    Design: Randomized controlled trial.

    Setting: Three child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) units in Region Skåne, Sweden.

    Participants: Children aged 13-18 years, coming for their first visit to CAP during 2022, were screened for gaming behavior. Those who met the proposed DSM-5 criteria for IGD were offered participation in the trial, if they had the capacity to provide written informed consent and if they spoke Swedish. A total of 111 CAP patients agreed to participate. Out of those, 11 patients were excluded due to incorrect inclusion such as young age (n = 1), or due to the absence of responses to follow-up measures (n = 9). After exclusion, 102 participants remained (intervention = 47, control = 55).

    Interventions: The intervention, RP, is based on cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) and was provided individually, comprising of five to seven 45-min sessions over a period of 5 to 7 weeks versus treatment as usual.

    Outcome measures: Participants were assessed with Game Addiction Scale for Adolescents pre-treatment (GASA) (baseline), post-treatment (treatment group only), and 3 months after baseline (follow-up).

    Results: The repeated measures ANOVA showed a significant interaction effect between treatment and time. Both the control group and treatment group lowered their mean GASA score from baseline to follow-up significantly, but the improvement was greater in the treatment group (mean difference in control group -5.1, p < 0.001, 95% CI = - 3.390 to -6.755, mean difference in treatment group -9.9, p < 0.001, 95% CI = -11.746 to -8.105).

    Conclusion: RP was found to be superior to treatment as usual in terms of reduction of IGD symptoms. Future research should address which aspects within a given treatment are effective, who benefits from treatment, in what aspects, and why.

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  • 2.
    Axelsson, Malin
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Nursing.
    Personlighetens betydelse för uppnådd och upplevd astmakontroll2011In: Fagbladet Allergi i praksis, ISSN 0806-5462, ISSN 0806-5462, p. 12-15Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Bador, Kourosh
    et al.
    AGERA KBT AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kerekes, Nora
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Evaluation of an Integrated Intensive Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Treatment Within Addiction Care2020In: Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research, ISSN 1094-3412, E-ISSN 1556-3308, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 102-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study aimed to evaluate an integrated intensive cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) group treatment for people with substance-related syndrome in outpatient care and to identify eventual gender differences. The study population consisted of 35 outpatients (18 male, 17 female) at a clinic in Western Sweden. The patients completed a four-month period of intensive group therapy and participated in the data collection at admission and discharge. The data were collected using the following inventories: Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale,Hopelessness Scale, and Trait Hope Scale. Results showed decreases in anxiety, depression and experience of hopelessness, and increases in self-esteem and hope. In females, the most dramatic improvement was measured for the anxiety and depression attributes, while in males the strongest effect was measured for hope and self-esteem. This study provides clinical evidence of the positive effects of integrated intensive CBT in outpatient care of people with substance-related syndrome.

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  • 4.
    Basinska, Beata A.
    et al.
    Gdansk University of Technology, Faculty of Management and Economics, Poland.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies. University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Be fearless : Positive affect as a mediator between venturesomeness and self-efficacy in future entrepreneurs and managers: Être intrépide : affect positif agissant comme médiateur entre l’audace et la connaissance de ses propres capacités chez les futurs entrepreneurs et managers2018In: Revue Européenne de Psychologie Appliquée / European Review of Applied Psychology, ISSN 1162-9088, Vol. 68, no 4-5, p. 171-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction and objectives. – Self-efficacy, personality and different affect states in entrepreneurs and managers are important factors for effectiveness and well-being. The aim of the study was to examine in young adults during entrepreneurship-related education, the relationships between venturesomeness and self-efficacy, and the mediating effects of positive affect and positive emotions (joviality, self-assurance, attentiveness) on these relationships.

    Method. – One hundred and fifty-three participants (mean age 22 years) completed questionnaires that assessed venturesomeness, general self-efficacy, positive affect (measured as a state), and positive emotions. Bootstrapping analyses with simple and multiple mediators were conducted, controlled for gender, to estimate the indirect effects of positive affect and positive emotions on venturesomeness and general self-efficacy.

    Results. – Venturesomeness was significantly correlated with self-efficacy. Positive affect (model 1), joviality and self-assurance, but not attentiveness (model 2), were complete mediators in the relationship between venturesomeness and self-efficacy.

    Conclusion. – The present study provides new evidence that heightened venturesomeness is related to higher levels of positive affect, self-assurance and joviality. Venturesomeness, therefore, may strengthen self-efficacy in young people during entrepreneurship-related education, and positive emotions may lead to an aware use of resources, including self-efficacy. These results may stimulate young people to be braveand to try new experiences.

  • 5.
    Basinska, Beata Aleksandra
    et al.
    Faculty of Management and Economics, Gdansk University of Technology, Narutowicza 11/12, Gdańsk (POL).
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Psychometric properties of the Bern illegitimate tasks scale using classical test and item response theories2023In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 7211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Combining a classical test theory and an item response theory (IRT), this study aimed to investigate the psychometric properties of the Bern Illegitimate Tasks Scale (BITS) by measuring two conceptually separate dimensions capturing unnecessary tasks (perceived by employees as pointless) and unreasonable tasks (perceived as unfairly or inappropriately assigned). Data collected among Polish employees in two samples (N= 965 and N= 803) were analysed. Results from the classical test theory (parallel analysis, exploratory and confrmatory factor analyses) indicated two correlated factors with four items each, confrming the theory of illegitimate tasks. This study is the frst to report item and scale functioning using IRT analysis of each of the two dimensions of BITS. All items on each dimension had acceptable discrimination and difculty parameters. Moreover, items had measurement invariance between men and women. All levels of unnecessary and unreasonable tasks were reliably captured by BITS items. Convergent and discriminant validities of both dimensions of BITS were confrmed in relation to work overload, work performance and occupational wellbeing. We conclude that BITS, in the case of the Polish version, is psychometrically suitable to use with the working population.

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  • 6.
    Basińska, Beata A.
    et al.
    Gdansk University of Technology, Poland.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Work Values of Police Officers and their Relationship with Job Burnout and Work Engagement2019In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Values represent people’s highest priorities and are cognitive representations of basic motivations. Work values determine what is important for employees in their work and what they want to achieve in their work. Past research shows that levels of both aspects of job-related well-being, job burnout and work engagement, are related to work values. The policing profession is associated with high engagement and a risk of burnout. There is a gap in the literature regarding the hierarchy of work values in police officers, how work values are associated with job burnout and work engagement in this group, and whether work values in police officers are sensitive to different levels of job burnout and work engagement. Therefore, the aim of our study was to examine the relationships between work values and job burnout and work engagement, in a group of experienced police officers. We investigated: (a) the hierarchy of work values based on Super’s theory of career development, (b) relationships between work values and burnout and work engagement, and (c) differences between the work values in four groups (burned-out, strained, engaged, and relaxed). A group of 234 Polish police officers completed the Work Values Inventory (WVI) modeled upon Super’s theory, the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale. The results show that police officers gave the highest priority to extrinsic work values. Job burnout was negatively correlated with the cognitive intrinsic work values (Creativity, Challenge, and Variety), while work engagement was positively correlated with the largest group of intrinsic work values (Creativity, Challenge, Variety, Altruism, and Achievement), as well as with the extrinsic work values (Prestige and Co-workers). The police officers showed significant differences, between levels of job burnout and work engagement, for intrinsic work values such as Variety, Challenge, and Creativity (large effects), and for Altruism and Prestige (moderate effects). The findings are discussed within the context of the Conservation of Resources theory, which explains how people invest and protect their personal resources, and how this is connected with preferred work values. We conclude that intrinsic work values are sensitive to different levels of burnout and engagement.

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  • 7.
    Björkum, Klara
    et al.
    Campus Västervik, Västervik kommun (SWE).
    Henriksson, Gerd
    Barn- och utbildningsförvaltningen Västervik kommun (SWE).
    Bergnehr, Disa
    Linnéuniversitetet (SWE).
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Att motverka och förebygga problematisk skolfrånvaro2023In: Skolhälsan, ISSN 0284-284X, no 2, p. 28-30Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 8.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    "Häng med på fest vid Sipperödssjön om en kvart"2012In: Barnbladet : SHSTF:s rikssektion för sjuksköterskor i öppen och sluten barnavård och barnsjukvård, ISSN 0349-1994, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 6-9Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Bolin, Anette
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Social Work and Social Pedagogy.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Nyman, Johanna
    Trollhättans Stad, Trollhättan (SWE).
    Socialtjänstens brottsförebyggande arbete ur ungas perspektiv2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Sverige har en lång historia av brottsförebyggande initiativ för att tidigt upptäcka ungdomar som är involverade i brottslighet eller befinner sig i kriminella miljöer. På operativ nivå involverar samarbetet främst socialtjänst och polis. Socialtjänsten i Trollhättans Stad har under 2021–2022 genomfört brottsförebyggande insatser inom ramen för projektet Tidig upptäckt – tidig insats (TUTI). Den här rapporten redovisar den följeforskning som bedrivits i anslutning till arbetet.TUTI bygger på tidiga interventioner, delaktighet och samverkan, såväl övergripande som i det enskilda fallet. Ambitionen med projektet var att minska risken för att unga 9–17 år utvecklar en kriminell livsstil samt förebygga risk för kriminalitet, missbruk, psykisk ohälsa och utanförskap. Detta genom att systematisera det arbete med brottsförebyggande insatser gällande unga förstagångslagöverträdare som sker i samverkan mellan socialtjänst, polis, åklagare och civilsamhälle.Följeforskningen har kartlagt typ av och bakgrund till orosanmälningar för unga 9–17 år i Trollhättans Stad samt undersökt ungas egna erfarenheter och förståelse av socialtjänstens brottsförebyggande insatser (TUTI-insatser). I studien har både kvantitativa och kvalitativa datainsamlingsmetoder använts. Data har tagits fram dels på aggregerad nivå gällande orosanmälningar i Trollhättans Stad under perioden 2017–2022, dels gällande de 196 unga som under perioden 2021–2022 erbjöds socialtjänstens brottsförebyggande insatser. Orsaker till orosanmälan var främst ringa stöld (30%), misshandel/våld/hot (20%) samt ringa narkotikabrott (20%). Ungefär hälften av de som erbjöds brottsförebyggande insatser tackade ja till insats. 21 av dessa deltog i återkommande kvalitativa intervjuer. Totalt genomfördes 41 intervjuer.Majoriteten av de intervjuade uppger vid uppföljningen cirka ett år efter den första intervjun att de inte har haft någon ny kontakt med socialtjänsten och att TUTI-stödet har förstärkt deras kapacitet att inte begå någon ny lagöverträdelse. Alla vittnar om att de redan vid tidpunkten för händelsen bestämt sig för att det var dumt gjort, men för några av dem var rentav det väsentligt att de fick stöd att vidmakthålla beslutet. De unga berättar att de har lärt sig mer om sig själva och utvecklat sin förmåga att ta positiva snarare än negativa beslut.För att förstå unga som för första gången kommer i kontakt med samhällets representanter när de misstänks för ett brott, har materialet analyserats med hjälp av modellen för proceduriell rättvisa (Tyler & Blader, 2003). Resultaten visar att de unga har högt förtroende för samhällets reaktion och ger legitimitet till det stöd som ges i kedjan av insatser: polis, mottagningsgrupp och familjebehandlare. Sammantaget kan vi konstatera att unga som genomgått hela TUTI-kedjan upplever samhällets reaktion vid sin första lagöverträdelse som positiv.

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  • 10.
    Buchanan, Christy M.
    et al.
    Wake Forest Univ, Winston Salem (USA).
    Glatz, Terese
    Orebro Univ, Orebro (SWE).
    Selçuk, Şule
    Hacettepe Univ, Ankara (TUR).
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke Univ, Durham, NC (USA).
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke Univ, Durham, NC (USA).
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Abu Dhabi Early Childhood Authority, Abu Dhabi (ARE); Hashemite University, Zarqa (JOR).
    Bacchini, Dario
    Department of Humanistic Studies, University of Naples “Federico II” (ITA).
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda; 0 UNICEF, New York (USA); Institute for Fiscal Studies, London (GBR).
    Chang, Lei
    Department of Psychology, University of Macau (CHN).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst (USA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Department of Psychology, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Rome (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham (USA).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Liu, Qin
    Maternal and Child Health, School of Public Health and Management, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (CHN).
    Long, Qian
    Global Health Research Center, Duke Kunshan University, Kunshan (CHN).
    Oburu, Paul
    Department of Psychology, Maseno University, Maseno (KEN).
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Department of Psychology, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Rome (ITA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Peace Culture Foundation, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia (USA); King Abdulaziz University (SAU).
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Universidad de San Buenaventura, Medellín (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Chiang Mai University, Suthep, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Department of Psychology, Ateneo de Manila University (PHL).
    Developmental Trajectories of Parental Self-Efficacy as Children Transition to Adolescence in Nine Countries: Latent Growth Curve Analyses2023In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about the developmental trajectories of parental self-efficacy as children transition into adolescence. This study examined parental self-efficacy among mothers and fathers over 3 1/2 years representing this transition, and whether the level and developmental trajectory of parental self-efficacy varied by cultural group. Data were drawn from three waves of the Parenting Across Cultures (PAC) project, a large-scale longitudinal, cross-cultural study, and included 1178 mothers and 1041 fathers of children who averaged 9.72 years of age at T1 (51.2% girls). Parents were from nine countries (12 ethnic/cultural groups), which were categorized into those with a predominant collectivistic (i.e., China, Kenya, Philippines, Thailand, Colombia, and Jordan) or individualistic (i.e., Italy, Sweden, and USA) cultural orientation based on Hofstede's Individualism Index (Hofstede Insights, 2021). Latent growth curve analyses supported the hypothesis that parental self-efficacy would decline as children transition into adolescence only for parents from more individualistic countries; parental self-efficacy increased over the same years among parents from more collectivistic countries. Secondary exploratory analyses showed that some demographic characteristics predicted the level and trajectory of parental self-efficacy differently for parents in more individualistic and more collectivistic countries. Results suggest that declines in parental self-efficacy documented in previous research are culturally influenced.

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  • 11.
    Campbell, Cory
    et al.
    University of Washington, Seattle (USA).
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, (USA).
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, (USA).
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Amherst, MA, USA (USA).
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Rome University La Sapienza, Faculty of Psychology , Rome, Italy (ITA).
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Norham, NC (USA).
    Liu, Qin
    Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (CHN).
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Sapienza, University of Rome (ITA).
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia (USA).
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Private practice (THA).
    Uribe Tirado, Liliana
    Universidad de San Buenaventura, Bogota (COL).
    Yotanyamaneewong, Saengduean
    Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (THA).
    Pena Alampay, Liane
    Ateneo de Manila University, Manila (PHL).
    Al-Hassan, Suha
    The Hashemite University, Zarqa (JOR).
    Baccini, Dario
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Rockville (USA).
    Chang, Lei
    University of Macau, Macau (CHN).
    Parallel Growth of Children’s Internalizing Behaviors Predicted by Positive Parenting Behaviors2021In: SRCD 2021 Virtual Biennial Meeting, 2021Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The global outbreak of COVID-19 has impacted all systems essential to human life and wellbeing (Masten & Motto-Stefanidi, 2020). The complex combination of health and economic stressors together with difficulty accessing protective factors may impact the family system in particular. Families differ in their responses to stressors (Bonanno et al., 2010), and the way in which families adjust to events and transitions related to the pandemic may be related to the distress perceived by children and their long-term wellbeing (Felix et al., 2013).This symposium will examine whether and through which processes families adjust during the global outbreak of COVID-19. We explore 2 research questions: 1)What did families do during the pandemic to maintain resilience? 2)What are the main protective and risk factors within the family context that are related to children’s and adolescents’ adjustment during this stressful and potentially traumatic event?Three strengths characterize the symposium. First, longitudinal designs with pre- and post-onset measurements enabled us to capture the dynamic nature of changes impacted by the COVID-19 outbreak. Second, the global nature of the outbreak is represented in cross-cultural perspective to understand commonalities and specificities of the processes activated by the event in different countries from Europe, North America, and Asia. Finally, mechanisms of resiliency and vulnerability examining the adjustment of the family members are assessed through longitudinal moderation and mediation analyses.

  • 12.
    Dauman, Nicolas
    et al.
    University of Poitiers, Department of Psychology, Poitiers , France.
    Haza, Marion
    University of Poitiers, Department of Psychology, Poitiers , France.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Liberating parents from guilt: a grounded theory study of parents' internet communities for the recognition of ADHD2019In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 1564520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: This study presents a qualitative analysis of information posted on the Internet by two communities of French parents promoting the recognition of ADHD in the context of current health and school practices.

    METHOD: Grounded Theory (Strauss & Corbin's approach) was applied to the posted messages, with the aim to discover the main concern and common theme through a constant comparison analysis.

    RESULTS: Liberating parents from feeling responsible for their child's misconduct was found to be the core category. From this perspective, we account for the commitment of the digital communities to formalize the child's conduct as a consequence of a neurodevelopmental disorder. This approach helps to account for the promotion of behavioural expertise and conditioning strategies (e.g., positive reinforcement) for handling the child's so-called disorder as appropriate parental responses. Giving evidence for parenting struggles was the third main concern of the communities, in the face of perceived skepticism from professionals towards ADHD as a medical condition.

    CONCLUSIONS: By using examples from countries that are found to have a more pro-medical approach to ADHD, the communities aim at improving such medical practices in France. Issues surrounding the claim that ADHD would require a specific style of parenting are also discussed.

  • 13.
    Drysdale, Maureen
    et al.
    Faculty of Health, University of Waterloo Director, Well-Link Research Lab, St. Jerome’s University, Waterloo (CAN).
    Johansson, Kristina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Callaghan, Sarah
    Faculty of Health, University of Waterloo Lab Manager, Well-Link Research Lab St. Jerome’s University, Waterloo (CAN).
    Folger, Miriam
    Baden-Heidenheim Cooperative State University(DHBW), Heidenheim an der Brenz (DEU).
    Mahr, Andreas
    Faculty of Technology, Baden-Heidenheim Cooperative State University (DHBW), Heidenheim an det Brenz (DEU).
    Belongingness, peer support, social connections, and well-being of WIL students in Canada, Germany, and Sweden2022In: International Conference on Work Integrated Learning: Abstract Book, Trollhättan: University West , 2022, p. 30-31Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    WIL in the context of higher education is a model of experiential education as per Kolb’s theory (Kolb, 1984; Kolb & Kolb, 2012) - which intentionally integrates students’ theoretical academic studies within a workplace or practical environment The purposeful integration of theory with practice supports learning, with the workplace serving as the mechanism for the enhanced learning, and while students are the primary focus of WIL, the essential philosophy is an educational partnership between universities, employers, and communities with the aim of providing students with an enriched learning experience (Blom, 2013; Johnston, 2017).

    Students who participate in a work-integrated learning (WIL) program during their higher education studies are often better prepared for work after graduation compared to students who do not receive discipline specific practical experience (Mandal & Edwards, 2021; Smith et al., 2019; Weldon & Ngo, 2019). But does this better preparedness come with a price? Do these students - who often spend months away from their campus community – have adequate access to important support networks and/or do they struggle with their well-being? Research has shown that overall well-being, social and peer support, social connections, and establishing a strong sense of belonging are believed to be important in a successful school-to-work transition and achieving a strong career identity (Conely et al., 2014; Huegaerts et al., 2020; Ruschoff et al., 2018). Students who participate in WIL – however have less access to their peers and the university community due to being away for work terms (McBeath et al., 2018). It is unknown whether this influences their overall well-being and subsequent transition to full-time work after graduation. As such, they deserve attention in the research on participation in WIL programs and the subsequent transition to the labour market.

    Goal and Research Questions

    This study furthers our understanding of how support systems and sense of belonging impact student mental health and well-being during work-terms. The results can inform the design of a support intervention aimed at improving and maintaining health and well-being outcomes for WIL students. Results also contribute to the literature regarding WIL, sense of belonging, peer support, social connections, well-being, and preparedness for school-to-work transitions.

    The study involved developing and administering a quantitative measure to examine aspects of, and the importance of, peer support and sense of belonging on improved mental health and well-being for WIL students. We also examined the role that social media and social connections played in this relationship. More specifically, we addressed the following research questions:

    1. What perceptions do WIL students have about sense of belonging and peer support?

    2. What demographic factors impact sense of belonging and peer support?

    3. How does WIL influence peer support and sense of belonging?

    4. How are peer support and sense of belonging related to mental health, and other psychological and health related outcomes in our WIL students?5. What role does social media and in particular virtual social connections play in sense of belonging, peer support, and well-being?6. What is the relationship between sense of belonging, peer support, social connections, mental health, and preparedness for school-to-work transitions? 

    Methods

    Data was collected from three institutions of higher education, namely University of Waterloo in Ca nada, University West in Sweden, and Baden-Heidenheim Cooperative State University (DHBW) in Germany. Ethical clearance was secured at all three institutions prior to data collection. Participants (WIL students) completed an online survey addressing sense of belonging, social and peer support, school-to-work self-efficacy, social media use, and well-being during their WIL placements. In addition to demographic variables (sex, age, year of study, and number of WIL placements) and constructed items measuring school-to-work efficacy and social media use for support and belonging, the survey also contained the following published scales:

    • Sense of Belonging Instrument (SOBI: Hagerty & Patusky, 1995)
    •  Psychological Sense of School Membership (PSSM: Goodenow, 1993)
    •  Interpersonal Support Evaluation List (ISEL -shortened version: Cohen et al., 1985)
    • Self-Description Questionnaire III (SDQ-III: Marsh & O’Neill, 1984)
    • Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS: Diener et al., 1985)
    •  Well-Being Manifestation Measure Scale (WBMMS: Massé et al., 1998) 

    Consent to participate was indicated by the participant’s voluntary completion of the online survey. The survey took approximately 15 to 20 minutes to complete. After correcting for missing data, the final data set had a sample size of 480 (University of Waterloo, n=190; University West, n=112, DHBW, n=178).

    Data Analysis

    Descriptive analyses provided frequencies, percentages, means, and standard deviations for the demographic variables. A series of t-tests were run to determine significant differences on the dependent variables as a function of country and demographics. A series of ANOVAs followed by Tukeys’ HSD post hoc analysis, were run to determine significant main effects. Levene’s test was performed for the demographic independent variables and the assumption of homogeneity of variance was satisfied. Finally, correlational analysis was run to examine significant relationships between the dependent variables – Sense of Belonging, Peer Support, school-to-work efficacy, Mental Health, and Well-Being. Incomplete scales (i.e., missing data) were eliminated from the analysis.

    Results

    Results indicated that WIL students from the three institutions reported only moderate levels of sense of belonging, however they perceived high levels of support from their peers. Higher levels of sense of belonging to the university community and access to high quality peer support was strongly related to better overall mental health and well-being. Interestingly, while WIL students perceived social media and virtual social connections during work terms as playing an important role in supporting their sense of belonging to peers and the university community, they preferred face to face social interactions for promoting their well-being. Additional results and implications will be provided in the presentation.

  • 14.
    Duvander, Ann-Zofie
    et al.
    Stockholm universitet.
    Haas, Linda
    Indiana University.
    Hwang, Philip
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies. Göteborgs Universitet.
    Sweden Country Note2015Report (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Basinska, Beata A.
    Management and Economics, Gdansk University of Technology, Gdansk, Poland.
    Evolutionary benefits of personality traits when facing workplace bullying2021In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 177, article id 110849Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Facing workplace bullying negatively affects physical and mental health, and consequently quality of life and well-being. Personality traits that can help an individual survive and reproduce entail more benefits than costs. Building on  two evolutionary theories, Life History Theory and Costly Signaling Theory, this study aims to provide novel insights into how and why personality traits are associated with facing workplace bullying and health-related quality of life. A heterogeneous group of 324 employees in Sweden provided data on workplace bullying, perceived health-related quality of life, and personality traits, controlling for sex and age. We found that openness (HEXACO model) and Machiavellianism (Dark Triad model) served as moderators. Employees with high values of  these traits experienced significantly less affected health-related quality of  life  when facing workplace bullying. Our results indicate evolutionary origins of the personality traits openness and Machia-vellianism. A new finding is that possessing, exhibiting, and maintaining traits reflecting a more creative and competitive interpersonal style increases an employee’s ability to survive aversive environments.  

  • 16.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Basinska, Beata A.
    Gdansk University of Technology, Faculty of Management and Economics, Poland.
    Job Demands, Engagement, and Turnover Intentions in Polish Nurses: The Role of Work-Family Interface2018In: Psychosocial job dimensions and distress/well-being: issues and challenges in occupational health psychology / [ed] Renato Pisanti, James Campbell Quick, Montgomery Anthony, Frontiers Media S.A., 2018, 1, p. 91-104Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Poland has lower ratios of employed registered nurses per 1,000 inhabitants than the EU average. Polish nurses work under miserable conditions without assisting personnel, and they reconcile their professional demands with responsibilities for their families; 96% of them are women.

    Rationale/Aims:

    This study uses Hobfoll's conservation of resources (CORs) theory to explain the role of various resources in the improvement of work conditions in the nursing profession. Work-family conflict (WFC) and family work conflict (FWC) threaten to deplete nurses' resources. This paper set out to (1) examine the extent to which perceived job demands (workload and interpersonal conflicts at work) and engagement (vigor, dedication, and absorption) are associated with turnover intentions (the intention to leave the present workplace and the intention to leave the nursing profession); (2) attempt to determine whether levels of WFC and FWC moderate these associations.

    Design/Method:

    This study comprised 188 female registered nurses. The inclusion criterion was to live with a partner and/or have children.

    Results:

    WFC was moderately related to FWC. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that only high job demands and low vigor were significantly associated with turnover intentions. WFC was experienced more intensively than FWC. Job demands, vigor, dedication, and turnover intentions had a strong effect on WFC, while absorption had a strong effect on FWC. However, levels of WFC and FWC did not significantly moderate these associations.

    Originality/Conclusion:

    The study produces new knowledge by examining a constellation of job demands, work engagement and WFC, which reflect the management of personal resources. Results from such a constellation in nurses from countries with a post-transformational economic system have not previously been discussed in the light of COR theory. Most importantly, we conclude that WFC does not intensify turnover intentions.

  • 17.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Forensic Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutet.
    Hallberg, Angela
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Skog, Sandra
    Kajonius, Petri
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    A Leadership Meta-Resource Factor Explicates Task Performance, Work Engagement, and Perceived Stress2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Past research links emotional leadership resources (e.g., emotional intelligence) positively with important working life outcomes, such as health, job satisfaction, job performance, organizational commitment, and leadership effectiveness. However, no study has yet described emotional leadership resources based on traits linked with work motivation and stress resilience. The aim was to describe emotional leadership resources based on traits in a novel fashion (meta-traits, based on structural trait analysis). Our hypothesis was that an emotional leadership meta-resource factor would converge with motivation and stress resilience. Participants (N = 344) were leaders aged between 23 and 65 years (M = 49, SD = 8.6; 58% women) who completed an online questionnaire including measures of common traits (e.g., trait emotional intelligence, Big Six), and coping resources. We estimated work motivation by self-rated work engagement, and stress resilience by the level of perceived stress. We used an exploratory factor analysis approach to describe and structure our data, and structural equation modelling (SEM) to test whether an emotional leadership meta-resource factor would converge with work motivation and stress resilience. Our findings revealed that the investigated traits and resources could be described along four broad emotional leadership resource factors, namely (1) Externalizing, (2) Moral goodness, (3) “Destrudo”, and (4) Rational mastery. As expected, the emotional leadership meta-resource factor showed a strong convergence (~.80) with both work motivation and stress resilience. “Externalizing” and “Rational mastery” were the most important emotional resource factors. The findings are discussed using Hobfoll’s motivational Conservation of Resources (COR) theory. It is concluded that common traits, including personality traits, and coping resources comprise an emotional leadership meta-resource factor, which to a high degree converges with work motivation and stress resilience. The results imply that organizations may strengthen work motivation and reduce stress by recruiting leaders possessing valuable emotional leadership resources.

  • 18.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Karolinska Institutet.
    Hallberg, Angela
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Skog, Sandra
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Kajonius, Petri
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Emotional Leadership in Relation to Task Performance, Work Engagement, and Perceived Stress2019In: Working for the greater good: Inspiring people, designing jobs and leading organizations for a more inclusive society / [ed] Prof. Franco Fraccaroli, Turin, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To describe and explore emotional leadership meta-resources based on traits (self-esteem, emotional intelligence, leadership intelligence, empathy, Big Six, narcissism) and coping resources (e.g. cognitive), using Hobfoll’s motivational Conservation of Resources (COR). Our hypothesis was that leadership resources would be positively related to work engagement and negatively to perceived stress.

    Methodology: Participants (N = 344) were leaders aged between 23 and 65 years (M = 49, SD = 8.6; 58% women) who completed an online questionnaire including measures of common traits and coping resources. Work engagement was measured by Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES-9; Schaufeli & Bakker, 2004), and stress by Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10; Cohen & Williamson, 1988). We used an exploratory factor analysis approach to describe and structure our data, and structural equation modelling (SEM) to test whether an emotional leadership meta-resource factor would be positively related to work engagement and negatively to perceived stress.

    Results: The investigated traits and resources could be described along four broad emotional leadership resource factors: (1) Externalizing; (2) Moral goodness; (3) Destrudo; (4) Rational mastery. As expected, the emotional leadership meta-resource factor showed a strong convergence (~.80) with both work engagement (positively) and perceived stress (negatively). 

    Research/Practical Implications: The results imply that organizations may strengthen work engagement and reduce stress by recruiting leaders possessing valuable emotional leadership resources.

    Originality/Value: Our study is the first to describe emotional leadership resources based on traits linked with work engagement and perceived stress in a novel fashion (meta-traits, based on structural trait analysis).

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  • 19.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Hjalmarsson, Annica
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Relationship between emotional intelligence, personality and work performance: A cross-sectional study2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The background of this study is the observation that people with high emotional intelligence (EI) perform well at work. The aim of this study was to further validate the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire Short Form (TEIQue-SF) by (1) investigating its relationships with the Mini International Personality Item Pool-6 Inventory (Mini-IPIP6), the Short Dark Triad Assessment (SD3), and the Individual Work Performance Questionnaire (IWPQ), (2) identifying which personality traits best explain variations in trait EI, and (3) investigating whether trait EI can predict variations in each dimension (Task Performance, Contextual Performance, and Counterproductive Work Behavior, CWB) of self-perceived work performance. A cross-sectional study was done with 228 Swedish participants (M = 34 years, SD = 12.6, range 16-71 years, 66% women) with an average work experience of 14 years (SD = 11.5). One expected result was that all dimensions of trait EI correlated negatively with Neuroticism and Machiavellianism, and positively with Extraversion, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Openness to Experience, and Narcissism. Self-control and Sociability had, however, almost zero correlation with Machiavellianism. A positive correlation was found between all dimensions of EI and Task Performance and Contextual Performance. Standard regression analyses showed that 26% to 46% of the variation in the different dimensions of EI was explained by the “Big Six” personality traits. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that trait EI accounted for a significant proportion of the variation in Contextual Performance that was not explained by any of the “Big Six” personality traits, and that trait EI did not explain any variation in CWB above Neuroticism and Honesty-Humility. In addition, trait EI explained an additional 6% of the variation in Task Performance when controlling for gender, age, Neuroticism and Conscientiousness. It is concluded that the Swedish version of the TEIQue-SF has shown reasonable theoretically and empirically grounded relationships with relevant variables for the workplace.

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  • 20.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Ingelgård, Anders
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Mölnlycke Health Care .
    Koopmans, Linda
    Sustainable Productivity & Employability, Leiden, The Netherlands (NLD).
    Cross-cultural adaptation, from Dutch to Swedish language, of the Individual Work Performance Questionnaire2020In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 97-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: There is a need for a short, self-rated, validated and reliable instrument for individual work performance suitable for generic use in the Swedish work and organizational context. The Individual Work Performance Questionnaire (IWPQ), comprising originally 47 items, was initially developed in the Netherlands, based on a four-dimensional conceptual framework, in which individual work performance consisted of task performance, contextual performance, adaptive performance, and counterproductive work behavior. During the development process, IWPQ was shortened to 18 items with three scales formally labeled as Task performance, Contextual performance, and Counterproductive work behavior (CWB), capturing three work performance types. The current version of the IWPQ, consisting of 18 items and three scales, was then translated as well as cross-culturally adapted to American-English and Indonesian contexts.

    OBJECTIVES: To translate and adapt the current IWPQ version, consisting of 18 items, from the Dutch to the Swedish context, to assess its content validity through cognitive interviews, to apply it to a pilot group to present descriptive statistics, to calculate the questionnaire’s internal consistency, as well as to clarify whether the translated items capture three or four performance types.

    METHODS: The Dutch version of the IWPQ, consisting of 18 items, was translated into Swedish. A six-stage translation and adaptation process was used: forward translation, synthesis, back translation, harmonization, cognitive interviews, revision, and sampling and analyses of pilot data for 206 managers (149 women) from five Swedish municipalities.

    RESULTS: IWPQ instructions, wording of a few items and one response form were slightly modified. The pilot testing showed Cronbach’s alphas similar to the Dutch version of the IWPQ, ranging between 0.73 and 0.82, good mean-inter-item correlations (all above 0.36). In deciding how many factors to retain, we employed both parallel analysis (PA), and Velicer’s minimum average partial (MAP) test. The number of factors to retain was, as indicated by PA, four, and by MAP, three or four. Exploratory factor analysis (principal axis factoring) revealed clearly separate factors, corresponding to four, rather than three, performance types. A new factor, roughly representing adaptive performance, comprised in the original, longer version of the IWPQ, emerged.

    CONCLUSIONS: The Swedish version of the IWPQ was successfully translated and adapted in a pilot group of managers. Before it is used, it should be validated in a larger group of managers and in more heterogeneous groups of both white- and blue-collar workers.

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  • 21.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Kajonius, Petri
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology. Department of Psychology, Lund University, Lund (SWE).
    An item response theory analysis of the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire Short-Form (TEIQue-SF) in the workplace2022In: Heliyon, E-ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 8, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trait emotional intelligence (EI) predicts important outcomes in the workplace. This study is the first one that reports item and scale functioning in the workplace using item response theory (IRT) analysis of the global 30-item Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire Short-Form (TEIQue-SF). Past IRT research, performed mostly on undergraduate English-speaking students, showed that several items in TEIQue-SF were poorly informative. Data collected in Sweden from 972 employed persons were analyzed. IRT with a graded response model was utilized to analyze items of the global TEIQue-SF scale. As was found in past research, the lowest response category in all items had extreme difficulty threshold parameter values, and only low and moderate levels of latent trait EI were adequately captured, but most items had good values of the discrimination parameters, indicating adequate item informativeness. Four items, which in past research have also shown weak psychometric properties, were poorly informative. To effectively measure trait EI in today’s organizations, there is an advantage in using the most informative items to best represent this construct. 

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    Elsevier OA
  • 22.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Kajonius, Petri
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Gärningsmannaprofilering: personlighetens betydelse för utförandet av brott2022Book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Dåderman, Anna Maria
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Ragnestål-Impola, Carina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Workplace bullies, not their victims, score high on the Dark Triad and Extraversion, and low on Agreeableness and Honesty-Humility2019In: Heliyon, E-ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 5, no 10, article id e02609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most past research has focused mainly on the personality of the victims of bullying and not on the personality of workplace bullies. Some researchers have suggested that bullies and their victims may share bully-typifying personality traits. The aims of this study were to find out what characterizes the personalities of workplace bullies and their victims, and to investigate the relationship between the Dark Triad, HEXACO and workplace bullying. We tested three hypotheses. H1: Machiavellianism and Psychopathy, but not Narcissism, predict the use of bullying tactics (i.e., bullying perpetration). H2: (Low) Honesty-Humility, (low) Agreeableness and (high) Extraversion predict the use of bullying tactics. H3: Honesty-Humility moderates the association between Machiavellianism and the use of bullying tactics. Employees in southwestern Sweden (N = 172; 99 women) across various occupations and organizations were surveyed. Negative Acts Questionnaire-Perpetrators (NAQ-P) and Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised (NAQ-R) were used to assess the use of bullying tactics and victimization. NAQ-P was correlated with NAQ-R (r = .27), indicating some overlap between the use of bullying tactics and victimization. NAQ-P was correlated with Machiavellianism (.60), Psychopathy (.58), Narcissism (.54), Agreeableness (-.34), Honesty-Humility (-.29) and Extraversion (.28). The results of linear regressions confirmed H1, but only partially confirmed H2: Machiavellianism, Psychopathy, (low) Agreeableness and (high) Extraversion explained 32%, 25%, 27% and 19%, respectively, of the variation in the NAQ-P. Replicating past research, NAQ-R was correlated with Neuroticism (.27), Extraversion (-.22), Openness (-.19) and Conscientiousness (-.16). Neuroticism explained 25% and (low) Extraversion 17% of the variation in the NAQ-R. Confirming H3, Honesty-Humility moderated the relationship between the NAQ-P and Machiavellianism. We conclude that bullies, but not their victims, are callous, manipulative, extravert and disagreeable, and that dishonest Machiavellians are the biggest bullies of all. In practice, the victims of workplace bullying need strong and supportive leadership to protect them from bullies with exploitative and manipulative personality profiles.

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  • 24.
    Elfstrand Corlin, Tinna
    et al.
    School of Health and Education, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Kajonius, Petri
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Psychology and organization studies. School of Health and Education, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Kazemi, Ali
    School of Health and Education, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    The impact of personality on person-centred care: a study of care staff in Swedish nursing homes2017In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 12, no 2, article id e12132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim and objective

    In this study, we explore how personal and situational factors relate to the provision of person-centred care (PCC) in nursing homes. Specifically, we focus on the relationship between the care staff's personality traits and provision of PCC and to what extent perceptions of the working environment influences this relationship.

    Background

    The ultimate goal of elderly care is to meet the older person's needs and individual preferences (PCC). Interpersonal aspects of care and the quality of relationship between the care staff and the older person are therefore central in PCC.

    Design and methods

    A cross-sectional Swedish sample of elderly care staff (= 322) completed an electronic survey including measures of personality (Mini-IPIP) and person-centred care (Individualized Care Inventory, ICI). A principal component analysis was conducted on the ICI-data to separate the user orientation (process quality) of PCC from the preconditions (structure quality) of PCC.

    Results

    Among the five factors of personality, neuroticism was the strongest predictor of ICI user orientation. ICI preconditions significantly mediated this relationship, indicating the importance of a supportive working environment. In addition, stress was introduced as a potential explanation and was shown to mediate the impact of neuroticism on ICI preconditions.

    Conclusions

    Personality traits have a significant impact on user orientation, and the perception of a supportive and stress free working environment is an important prerequisite for achieving high-quality person-centred elderly care.

    Implications for practice

    Understanding how personality is linked to the way care staff interacts with the older person adds a new perspective on provision of person-centred elderly care.

  • 25.
    Elfstrand Corlin, Tinna
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Psychology, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Kazemi, Ali
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    The older person as a client, customer or service user?2019In: Working with Older People, ISSN 1366-3666, E-ISSN 2042-8790, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 9-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe three different approaches to work in elderly care (i.e. professional, market-oriented and person-centred) and examine whether these theoretically derived approaches can be confirmed empirically. Additional aims were to examine the endorsement of these approaches and whether there were differences in the endorsement of these approaches in nursing home vs home care and municipality vs privately run care units. Design/methodology/approach Data were collected using a cross-sectional survey study of frontline care staff (n=1,342). Exploratory factor analysis was used to investigate the empirical validity of the proposed approaches to work in elderly care. A series of paired and independent samples t-tests were conducted to analyse mean differences between the proposed approaches to work. Findings A principal axis factoring analysis yielded three theoretically meaningful factors as proposed. These results indicated that the respondents were able to differentiate between three distinct but related approaches to work with older persons. The results also showed that the professional care approach was the highest endorsed and the market-oriented the lowest endorsed approach. No notable differences in approaches to work were observed in nursing home vs home care and municipality vs privately run care units. Originality/value This is the first study to examine multiple approaches to work in elderly care as previous research studies mainly have investigated the person-centred care approach. Current findings indicate that these approaches to work often coexist in various combinations and that the care staff adopts all these approaches but to varying degrees. The approaches differ in several important respects (e.g. legitimacy and view of the older person) and most likely affect the way care staff treats the older person and how the older person perceives their relationship with the care staff. Knowledge about these differences facilitates management of the care staff’s work situation and helps to improve the quality of care.

  • 26.
    Eriksson, Sarah
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies.
    Svanberg, Linnea
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies.
    Hur framställs poliser av allmänheten i media?: En kvalitativ studie om polisers subjektiva upplevelser och åsikter2024Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    To work as a police in today’s modern society means to be more exposed, even though the duty of law enforcement is to protect members of society and keep them safe. Social media is used by police all around the country for the purpose of spreading information about the role of the police, but also to disseminate other information from which the public may benefit. One disadvantage with social media is that anyone can publish online. Individuals may capture video of police officers doing their job and publish that media out of context. As social media platforms spread news and events involving police, a consequence can be a biased view of police. Our study is grounded in George Gerbner Cultivation theory from 1976 and examined the experiences of individuals who work in law enforcement, to shed light on how the police themselves feel about their representation on social media. We used semi-structured interviews with eight employees within the police, and the transcribed material was examined using thematic analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2006). The result showed that comprehension for working as a police officer, hate against the police, fellowship and social media are important concepts among police’s perception about how they are portrayed. The study’s aim is to contribute to the understanding of the role of the police, according to the police themselves. The study is also about contributing to society’s feelings of safety, but also how social media can depict a distorted image of police officers.

  • 27.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    ADHD - Omsorg framför utredning2018In: Best Practice :Psykiatri/neurologi, Vol. 9, no 34, p. 17-19Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Varför har NPD-diagnoser för barn utvecklats till en epidemi?2023In: Abstracts för DecemberkonferensenInstitutionen för individ och samhälle 13 december 2023, Trollhättan, Sweden, Trollhättan: Högskolan Väst , 2023, p. 1-1Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den neuropsykiatriska diagnosmanualen är ett trubbigt verktyg och saknar dessutom – i de flesta fall – ett individuellt perspektiv på de drabbade barnens situation. Att inte erkänna att människors erfarenheter och upplevelser skiljer sig åt, riskerar att marginalisera barn och unga. Vi behöver förstå att unga som försöker leva upp till vuxensamhällets förväntningar äger förmågor och egenskaper som behöver vårt skydd.

    Tyvärr lägger psykologer inom barn- och ungdomspsykiatrin (BUP) och andra privata mottagningar för ADHD en stor del av sin tid på att utreda de lidande barnen, istället för att erbjuda terapi och stöd till både barn och vårdgivare. Föräldrar som i stället erbjuds hjälp att se sitt barn som en unik individ, utan den normativa bilden av önskvärt beteende, kan öka sin empatiska förmåga och sin tillit till barnet.

  • 29.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Dauman, Nicolas
    Department of Psychology, University of Poitiers, Poitiers (FRA).
    The Aftermath of Silencing the Trauma: A Narrative Case Study2023In: Narrative and Mental Health: Reimagining Theory and Practice / [ed] Mildorf, Jarmila, Punzi, Elisabeth, Singer, Christoph, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2023, p. 86-103Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The association between silence and powerlessness is one reason behind rape victims’ decision to remain silent about the assault. Rape victims, who most often are traumatized, face a wide array of negative experiences as a consequence of the violence. At the heart of this trauma narrative is the case of a female patient, 70 years old, suffering from tinnitus, for which she was offered psychotherapy. During one of the last therapy sessions the patient disclosed that she was raped at the age of 22 by a man she met when searching for a job. This case study explores the complex relationship between sensory fragments (i.e., hallucinations and tinnitus) and the disclosure of a hidden trauma that occurred half a century earlier. It also illustrates how establishing a confidential therapeutic alliance can contribute to a sustained integration of fragmented experiences of the trauma into a personal history.

  • 30.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Hornborg, Christoffer
    Department of Sociology and Work Science, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg (SWE), Campus Västervik, Västervik (SWE).
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Dauman, Nicolas
    Department of Psychology, Université de Poitiers, Univ Rennes, Univ Angers, Univ Brest, RPPSY, Poitiers (FRA).
    Is ADHD a way of conceptualizing long-term emotional stress and social disadvantage?2022In: Frontiers in Public Health, E-ISSN 2296-2565, Vol. 10, p. 1-14, article id 966900Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    The prevalent, neuropsychiatric, deficit perspective on childrenand youth diagnosed with ADHD prohibits a multidimensional approach wheresocio-economic status, family stress and relationships within the familiesare relevant factors to examine. Assessments of ADHD through the use ofrating scales and short-term interventions may lead not only to overdiagnosis but also to a reductionistic approach in the psychiatric field. This literaturereview aims to address research outside the prevailing discourse on ADHD as an organic brain dysfunction and broaden the perspectives on children’s behavioral difculties.

    Methods:

    The articles included in this applied, mixed-method, systematic review includes 26 peer-reviewed articles, both English and French, with a search focus on ADHD in children and youth related to Attachment stylesand relationships.

    Results:

    In the studies reported, researchers approached correlations between ADHD and attachment in different ways, and in most cases, there was a caution to address causality. The role of parents was found to be both buffering and aggravating for the appearance of ADHD. In the French case studies, the diagnosis was conceptualized as a relational phenomenon where the child’s behavior was inseparable from family member’s suffering.

    Discussion:

    This review article illustrates how children’s difficulties in terms of ADHD symptoms can be addressed through a paradigm where emotional and cognitive dysregulation is understood through psychosocial factors rather than as a neurological condition. In our view, to avoid an overly reductionistic and medicalized approach to children’s behavioral difficulties, it is time to reiterate the value of the biopsychosocial perspective.

    Conclusion:

    Professionals and researchers need to acknowledge that becoming diagnosed with ADHD has a strong connection to economic disadvantage, social status, and familial care. The academic discourse of addressing brain dysfunctions might serve the unintended purpose of masking emotional stress and social disadvantage that manifests across generations. A biopsychosocial approach to ADHD including family, emotional history, and socio-economic issues could imply a lesser focus on medical treatment as a first choice.

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  • 31.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Punzi, E.
    Department of Psychology, Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    A biased ADHD discourse ignores human uniqueness2017In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 12, article id 1319584Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 32.
    Forsberg, Louise
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies.
    Ohlsson, Matilda
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies.
    Sociala medier och självförtroende: Hur användandet av sociala medier samverkar med upplevt självförtroende2024Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    The presence on social media is high among the Swedish population, and previous research suggests that intensive use can have a negative effect on well-being. At the same time, self-confidence has been shown to be an important factor for individual well-being. Furthermore, there is limited research on how self-confidence correlates with social media use, indicating that there is much to explore in this area.

    Materials and Methods.

    To adress the aim and research question of how social media usage interacts with perceived self-confidence among the Swedish population, the national SOM survey from 2015 was utilized. 3400 individuals aged 16 to 85 were randomly selected from the population register. A total of 1685 respondents answered all questions, including control variables. Multiple regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between social media and self-confidence, taking into account background variables.

    Results.

    The results showed a weak negative correlation between social media and self-confidence, but this correlation did not persist when controlling for gender, education, and age.

    Conclusion.

    The degree of social media usage is one of the several factors that can have a negative impact on self-confidence. Additionally, the influence of gender, education, and age should be considered when examining the relationship between social media and self-confidence.

  • 33.
    Glatz, Terese
    et al.
    School of Behavioural, Social, and Legal sciences, Örebro University, Örebro (SWE).
    Alsarve, Jenny
    School of Humanities, Education, and Social sciences, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Daneback, Kristian
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    An examination of parents’ online activities and links to demographic characteristics among parents in Sweden2023In: Journal of Family Social Work, ISSN 1052-2158, E-ISSN 1540-4072, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we examined parents’ online activities and whether engagement in specific activities attracts certain parents. Additionally, we examined sub-groups of parents regarding their difficulties to interpret and deal with online information. We used a sample of 401 parents of children below the age of five living in Sweden. The results showed that most parents used the Internet frequently, but there were differences in what activities parents were involved in. In general, results suggested that mothers and parents of younger children used the Internet more to find information about parenting related issues compared to fathers and parents of older children. Mothers seemed to rely more on online information in their parenting role than did fathers, but at the same time, they reported more troubles dealing with the information they found online. Additionally, parents with higher education read parenting blogs whereas parents with lower education posted photos and information on Social Networking Sites (SNS). The results of this study offer important knowledge regarding variations in parents’ online use and might be used to develop support offered to different groups of parents. © 2023 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

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  • 34.
    Glatz, Terese
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro (SWE).
    Daneback, Kristian
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Alsarve, Jenny
    Örebro University, Örebro (SWE).
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Parents’ Feelings, Distress, and Self-Efficacy in Response to Social Comparisons on Social Media2023In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843, Vol. 32, no 8, p. 2453-2464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parents’ social comparisons on social networking sites (SNS) is a research area of growing interest. In this study, we examined parents’ positive and negative feelings when comparing with other parents and associations with self-reported distress (i.e., stress and depression) and self-efficacy. We used a sample of 422 Swedish parents of children below the age offive (Mage = 1.29 years). In a first step, we examined construct validity of two new measures on parents’ positive and negative feelings when doing comparisons on SNS. In a second step, we examined associations with self-reported parenting.

    Results showed that parents reported more positive feelings than negative feelings in relation to other parents on SNS.

    Further, negative feelings when doing social comparisons were linked to more distress and lower level of self-efficacy, where as positive feelings when doing social comparisons predicted higher level of self-efficacy, but not distress. These results suggest that negative feelings are related to lower actual levels of distress and self-efficacy, but positive feelings can have an instant positive effect on parents’ perceived competence, but not on their well-being. Practitioners can encourage parents to reflect on who they compare with on SNS and why, as it might enable evaluations that could lead to selfimprovement rather than weakening of oneself as a parent.

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  • 35.
    Grankvist, Gunne
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Persson, Anders
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Återinför muntliga examinationer för att motverka fusk: Debatt 16 september, 20232023In: Universitetsläraren, p. 1-1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    När det blir en sjukdom: en studie om hur olika yrkesprofessioners arbete påverkas då spelberoende, 'Internet Gaming Disorder', blir en diagnos.2018In: Nya vägar, nya perspektiv: Barn- och ungdoms nätverket i samarbete med Tema barn, Linkopings universitet, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2018, p. 8-8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Idag arbetar flera verksamheter på olika sätt med de diagnoser som finns och påverkar barn och ungdomar i skolan. Nya diagnoser tillkommer då och då, och sommaren 2018 informerade Världshälsoorganisationen (WHO) om att TV-spelberoende nu klassas som en diagnos, s.k. Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD). TV-spel av olika karaktär är frekvent använda av barn och ungdomar och i Sverige spelar 87 % av barn 9-12 år varje dag. Spelberoende är omdiskuterat och kan ses som ett eget problem eller en följd av andra problem. Avsaknaden av forskning inom området innebar att American Pyschiatric Association uppmanade till mer forskning om Internet Gaming Disorder och med en IGD-diagnos från WHO kommer mer kunskap inom området att behövas. Syftet med föreliggande studie är att följa hur elevhälsans, socialtjänstens och hälso- och sjukvårdens arbete förändras i och med en ny diagnos och vilket lärande som därigenom kommer till stånd. Vidare ska studien undersöka hur förhållningssättet till barns och ungdomars aktörskap ser ut vid ny diagnos.

  • 37.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Bacikova-Sleskova, Maria
    University of Pavol Jozef Šafárik, Košice (SVK).
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Community series in the consequences of COVID-19 on the mental well-being of parents, children and adolescents, volume II: Editorial2023In: Frontiers in Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1664-0640, Vol. 14, p. 1-2Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 38.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Kapetanovic, Sabina
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Einarsson, Isak
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund (SWE); Region Skåne, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Regional Outpatient Care, Lund University Hospital, Lund (SWE).
    Boson, Karin
    Department of Psychology, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences (NOR).
    Claesdotter-Knutsson, Emma
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund (SWE); Region Skåne, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Regional Outpatient Care, Lund University Hospital, Lund (SWE).
    Adolescents’ Perceptions of a Relapse Prevention Treatment for Problematic Gaming: A Qualitative Study2023In: Healthcare, E-ISSN 2227-9032, Vol. 11, no 17, p. 2366-2366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Given the increasing prevalence of problematic gaming, in 2013, the diagnosis “Internetgaming disorder (IGD)” was included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5) as a potential diagnosis. With a new diagnosis, it is important to determine treatment options. The importance of the parent–child relationship has been emphasised in problematic gaming and its treatment. This study aims to provide more knowledge about adolescents’ perceptions of a treatment for problematic gaming and understand whether such treatment may have a bearing on the parent–child relationship. We conducted individual interviews with nine adolescents who completed a treatment for problematic gaming. The interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. The analysis revealed three themes.

    Theme 1: adolescents’ experiences of the new treatment;

    Theme 2: adolescents’ perceptions of the effect of the treatment on their gaming behaviour; and

    Theme 3: adolescents’ perceptions of changes in their parent–child relationships.

    The adolescents viewed the treatment as a way of gaining control of their gaming, a process in which a therapist played an integral part. For the majority of the adolescents in our study, the main effects of treatment were gaining insight into how their gaming and gaming-related behaviours affected other parts of their lives. The participants felt that the treatment improved their relationship with their parents through reducing everyday conflicts. This new knowledge can be used for the development of future interventions involving children and adolescents.

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  • 39.
    Gurdal, Sevtap
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Cultural values, parenting and child adjustment in Sweden2024In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To examine whether mothers' and fathers' individualism, collectivism and conformity values are significantly related to parenting behaviours and child adjustment during middle childhood, mothers (n = 95), fathers (n = 72) and children (n = 98) in Sweden were interviewed when children were, on average, 10 years old. Mothers' collectivism was significantly correlated with mothers' and fathers' higher expectations for children's family obligations. Fathers' collectivism was significantly correlated with mothers' and fathers' higher warmth and with fathers' higher expectations for children's family obligations. Fathers' conformity values were significantly correlated with fewer child internalising problems. Fathers' higher collectivism was associated with more paternal warmth even after taking into account the other cultural values, child gender and fathers' education. Our findings indicate that individual-level cultural values are correlated with some aspects of parenting and child adjustment in Sweden.

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  • 40.
    Gyberg, Fanny
    et al.
    Department of Psychology University of Gothenburg Gothenburg (SWE).
    Svensson, Ylva
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Wängqvist, Maria
    Department of Psychology University of Gothenburg Gothenburg (SWE).
    Syed, Moin
    Department of Psychology University of Minnesota Twin Cities (USA).
    Discrimination and its relation to psychosocial well‐being among diverse youth in Sweden2021In: New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development, ISSN 1520-3247, E-ISSN 1534-8687, Vol. 176, p. 163-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experiences of discrimination and links to well-being have been examined extensively, but several gaps remain. The current study addresses four of those gaps by (1) examining both aggregated and source-specific forms of discrimination, (2) comparing the experiences of minority and majority group members, (3) expanding the range of outcomes to include socially and developmentally appropriate measures, and (4) conducting the study in Sweden, a context in which discrimination and well-being are not well understood. The sample consisted of 573 adolescents and emerging adults (71% women, Mage = 19.21 years) who completed survey measures of discrimination and psychosocial well-being (self-esteem, life satisfaction, school adjustment, and identity distress). Findings indicated that minority groups reported more frequent discrimination, and more often cited ethnicity as the source of discrimination, whereas majority groups most often cited gender. Experiencing discrimination was related to poorer psychosocial well-being similarly for all groups. Youth experiencing ethnic discrimination were more often subjected to multiple forms of discrimination compared with those subjected to other forms of discrimination. Taken together, this study brings important information on the complexity of discrimination among youth in the multicultural context of migration in Sweden.

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  • 41.
    Haas, Linda
    et al.
    Department of Sociology, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Hwang, Philip
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden ABSTRACT Paid parental leave for fathers is a promising social policy tool.
    Policy is not enough–the influence of the gendered workplace on fathers’ use of parental leave in Sweden2019In: Community, Work and Family, ISSN 1366-8803, E-ISSN 1469-3615, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 58-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Paid parental leave for fathers is a promising social policy tool for degendering the division of labor for childcare. Swedish fathers have had the right to paid parental leave since 1974, but they take only one-fourth of leave days parents take. There are strong cultural norms supporting involved fatherhood, so couples typically want to share leave more than they do. This article explores how workplaces can constrain Swedish fathers’ use of state leave policy, in ways that fathers can take for granted, a topic that has received less attention than individual or family-related obstacles. Based on interviews with 56 employees in five large private companies, we found that masculine workplace norms can make it difficult for fathers to choose to take much leave, while aspects of traditional workplace structure building on these norms can negatively affect fathers’ capabilities of taking much leave. Workplace culture and structure seemed to be based on assumptions that the ideal worker should prioritize work and has limited caregiving responsibilities, setting limits to fathers’ ability to share leave with mothers. Gender theorists suggest such assumptions persist because of male dominance at the workplace and the endurance of gendered assumptions about the roles of men and women. © 2018, © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 42.
    Hamideh, Daniala
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Svensson, Susanna
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Humor inom omvårdnad: En kvalitativ studie om hur undersköterskor använder humor i arbetet med äldre patienter2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Humor can be a significant element in the health care that contributes to the improvement of the relationship between the assistant nurse and the patient. Previous research indicates that humor can adversely impact health and well-being of patients and has a healing effect. The aim of the present study was to investigate the importance of humor and laughter in health care teams, and to explore how the nurses use humor in their work. The study was based on qualitative approaches, and the method of analysis used was thematic analysis. Data collection was done by interviewing six nurses from two nursing homes, four at one and two at the other. The results are reported by the three themes identified in the analysis. These themes are 1, Humor as a communicative tool 2, Humor for patient comfort 3, Humor as a balancing act. In conclusion, humor can have a positive impact and increase the well-being of the patients, provided that the caregivers use it for patient needs and in the right situation. Humor could also be used to avoid unpleasant and sensitive situations

  • 43.
    Hedlund, Rikard
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Förhållningssätt i konflikter: från teori till upplevelse2022In: Använd rummet: Högskolepedagogiska metoder för aktiva lärosalar / [ed] Alfredsson, V., Asker, N., Backman, C. & Uhnoo, S., Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2022, p. 203-211Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Henry, Alastair
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Davydenko, Sofia
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Thriving? Or Surviving?: An Approach-Avoidance Perspective on Adult Language Learners' Motivation2020In: The Modern language journal, ISSN 0026-7902, E-ISSN 1540-4781, Vol. 104, no 2, p. 363-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning a language is a long-term undertaking. In this endeavor, motivation is served by patterns of regulation that steer and control behavior. Regulation can be focused on possibilities and opportunities (an approach pattern), or the implications of failure (an avoidance pattern). Responding to calls for work with a focus on regulation (Papi et al., 2019), and with the aim of developing insights into second-language perseverance, this study explores the regulation profiles of highly motivated adult learners of Swedish. Using the directed motivational currents construct as a template, analyses of interview data from 18 participants revealed distinct patterns of approach- and avoidance-focused regulation. While approach orientations were associated with enjoyment and well-being, avoidance orientations were associated with worry and stress. The effects of regulatory orientations on motivational sustainability are discussed, and implications for theory and practice are considered. © National Federation of Modern Language Teachers Associations

  • 45.
    Hjalmarsson, Marie
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Home help work: balancing loyalties2015In: Makeshift Work in a Changing Labour Market: The Swedish Model in the Post-Financial Crisis Era / [ed] Garsten, Christina, Lindvert, Jessica & Thedvall, Renitha, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, p. 138-155Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the aftermath of the global financial crisis, people who had never before had cause to worry about losing their jobs entered the ranks of the unemployed for the first time. In Sweden, the welfare state has been radically challenged and mass unemployment has become a reality in what used to be viewed as a model case for a full employment society. With an emphasis on Sweden in the context of transnational regulatory change, Makeshift Work in a Changing Labour Market discusses how the market mediates employment and moves on to explore the ways in which employees adjust to a new labour market. Focusing on the legibility, measurability and responsibility of jobseekers, the expert contributors of this book bring together an analysis of activation policy and new ways of organizing the mediation of work, with implications for the individual jobseeker. Students and researchers of labour market policy, the organization of markets and work and society both in Sweden and abroad will find this book to be of interest. Policy makers will find the empirical examples of policy processes among employees an extremely useful and insightful tool.

  • 46.
    Holm, Anne Lise
    et al.
    Centre for Women’s, Family and Child Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Buskerud and Vestfold University College, Kongsberg.
    Lyberg, Anne
    Centre for Women’s, Family and Child Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Buskerud and Vestfold University College, Kongsberg.
    Berggren, Ingela
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Divison of Caring Sciences, undergraduate level. Centre for Women’s, Family and Child Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Buskerud and Vestfold University College, Kongsberg.
    Cutcliffe, John
    School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa .
    Severinsson, Elisabeth
    Centre for Women’s, Family and Child Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Buskerud and Vestfold University College, Kongsberg.
    Shadows from the past: The situated meaning of being suicidal among depressed older people living in the community2014In: Crisis, ISSN 0227-5910, E-ISSN 2151-2396, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 253-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Most depressed older people in a suicidal state have mixed feelings, where the wish to live and the wish to die wage a battle. Aims: To explore and describe depressed older people’s experiences of being suicidal and their search for meaning. Method: Data were collected from 29 participants resident in the Rogaland and Vestfold districts of Norway, by means of individual interviews, after which a thematic analysis was performed. Results: For the participants in this study, the lived experiences of the situated meaning of survival after being suicidal comprised a main theme—”shadows from the past”—and two themes—”feeling that something inside is broken” and ”a struggle to catch the light.” Conclusion: Mental health-care professionals might be able to reduce the risk of suicide and perturbation by helping depressed older people to explore, resolve, and ultimately come to terms with their unresolved historical issues. Additional valuable strategies in primary care settings include encountering patients frequently, monitoring adherence to care plans, and providing support to address the source of emotional pain and distress. 

  • 47.
    Hwang, Philip
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Förord2018In: Barn- och ungdomsvetenskap: grundläggande perspektiv / [ed] Johansson, Thomas & Sorbring, Emma, Stockholm: Liber, 2018, 1. uppl.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Hwang, Philip
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Förord2018In: Moderna familjer: barn och föräldrar i nya konstellationer, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 49. Hwang, Philip
    Informella arbetsplatskulturer: ett hinder för pappors familjeliv2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Hwang, Philip
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Frisén, Ann
    Göteborgs universitet, Psykologiska institutionen, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Nilsson, Björn
    Göteborgs universitet, Psykologiska institutionen, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Ungdomar och unga vuxna: utveckling och livsvillkor2018Book (Other academic)
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