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  • 1.
    Ellbin, Susanne
    et al.
    The Institute of Stress Medicine, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Lindegård, Agneta
    The Institute of Stress Medicine, Gothenburg (SWE); School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg (SWE); Department of Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Jonsdottir, Ingibjörg H
    The Institute of Stress Medicine, Gothenburg (SWE); School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg (SWE); Department of Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Dahlborg, Elisabeth
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Psychologists' involvement in and experiences of treating patients with stress-related exhaustion in primary care.2024In: BMC Primary Care, E-ISSN 2731-4553, Vol. 25, no 1, article id 56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Primary health care is the setting for most patients with stress-related mental health problems. Good care processes are important for patients with stress-related mental health problems and the complex needs of these patients has become a challenge for primary care settings which is traditionally designed to manage acute episodes of one illness. The care process of these patients is thus interesting to investigate. The aim of this study was to explore psychologists´ involvement and experiences regarding the organisation of the care process and treatment of patients seeking care for stress-related exhaustion.

    METHOD: Fifteen psychologists (14 women and 1 man, age range 27-72 years)c from fifteen different primary health care centres in the western part of Sweden, located in both rural and urban areas were included. Qualitative content analysis of individual semi-structured interviews was conducted.

    RESULTS: The analysis resulted in eight subcategories within the two main categories studied illuminating psychologists' involvement and experiences regarding the organisation of the care process and challenges regarding treatment of patients seeking care for stress-related exhaustion.

    CONCLUSION: The care process of patients with stress-related exhaustion is perceived to be ineffective and not congruent with the needs of the patients. A lack of holistic overview of the care process, a lack of collaboration and poor utilization of the health care professionals' competence leads to an unstructured process forcing the patients to be the carriers and coordinators of their own care.

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  • 2. Falkmer, S
    et al.
    Samuelson, Gösta
    Sjölin, S
    Penicillaminbehandling vid Wilsons sjukdom: [Penicillamine treatment of Wilson's disease].1969In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 66, no 20, p. 2097-105Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Falkmer, S
    et al.
    Samuelson, Gösta
    Sjölin, S
    Penicillamine-induced normalization of clinical signs, and liver morphology and histochemistry in a case of Wilson's disease.1970In: Pediatrics, ISSN 0031-4005, E-ISSN 1098-4275, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 260-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Holmgren, G
    et al.
    Jeppson, J O
    Samuelson, Gösta
    High-voltage electrophoresis in urinary amino acid screening1970In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 313-318Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Löyttynen, Jenny
    et al.
    Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå (SWE).
    Hällgren Graneheim, Ulla
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Hörnsten, Åsa
    Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå (SWE).
    District Nurses' Experiences of Practice in Caring for People with Mental Ill-Health in Swedish Primary Care.2023In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 396-405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mental ill-health is one of the greatest public health challenges in Sweden, and it is estimated that every third person seeking primary care in the country suffers from mental ill-health. Without proper treatment at an early stage, mental ill-health may lead to long-term illness and have a significant impact on functional ability. As district nurses are specialists in public health nursing, they have been pointed out as having a key role in the prevention and management of mental ill-health. The aim was to explore district nurses' practice in caring for people with mental ill-health within primary health care. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with district nurses (n = 18) and the transcribed text was subjected to qualitative content analysis. The result was formulated as several subthemes, eventually developed into three themes: Practicing within an organisation where traditional attitudes are impediments, Perceiving mental healthcare as not being an obvious part of district nursing, Working as fellow human beings rather than "professionals". The findings indicate that district nurses feel uncertainty in their practice in this area. Working independently with mental ill-health was not always considered socially acceptable among district nurses. Despite these challenges they tried to remain involved without becoming emotionally overwhelmed. They also strived to meet the needs of these patients with 'small things', that could be effective and a part of recovery-oriented practice, even if they might be defined as unprofessional, and their efficacy negated.

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  • 6. Melin, K
    et al.
    Samuelson, Gösta
    Gonadal dysgenesis with lymphocytic thyroiditis and deletion of the long arm of the X chromosome1969In: Acta paediatrica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-656X, Vol. 58, no 6, p. 625-31Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Rawshani, Nina
    et al.
    Varberg Hospital, Varberg, Halland County, Sweden.
    Rawshani, Araz
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Medicine, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Gelang, Carita
    University College of Borås, The Pre-hospital Research Centre of Western Sweden, Prehospen, Borås, Sweden.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Medicine, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Bång, Angela
    University of Borås, School of Health Science, Borås, Sweden.
    Andersson, Jan-Otto
    Ambulance Service, Skaraborg, Sweden.
    Gellerstedt, Martin
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Could ten questions asked by the dispatch center predict the outcome for patients with chest discomfort?2016In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 209, no April, p. 223-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: From 2009 to 2010, approximately 14,000 consecutive persons who called for the EMS due to chest discomfort were registered. From the seventh month, dispatchers ask 2285 patient ten pre-specified questions. We evaluate which of these questions was independently able to predict an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), life-threatening condition (LTC) and death.

    METHODS: The questions asked mainly dealt with previous history and type of symptoms, each with yes/no answers. The dispatcher took a decision on priority; 1) immediately with sirens/blue light; 2) EMS on the scene within 30min; 3) normal waiting time.We examined the relationship between the answers to these questions and subsequent dispatch priority, as well as outcome, in terms of ACS, LTC and all-cause mortality.

    RESULTS: 2285 patients (mean age 67years, 49% women) took part, of which 12% had a final diagnosis of ACS and 15% had a LTC. There was a significant relationship between all the ten questions and the priority given by dispatchers. Localisation of the discomfort to the center of the chest, more intensive pain, history of angina or myocardial infarction as well as experience of cold sweat were the most important predictors when evaluating the probability of ACS and LTC. Not breathing normally and having diabetes were related to 30-day mortality.

    CONCLUSIONS: Among individuals, who call for the EMS due to chest discomfort, the intensity and the localisation of the pain, as well as a history of ischemic heart disease, appeared to be the most strongly associated with outcome.

  • 8.
    Samuelson, Sarah
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics. Region Västra Götaland, Research, Education, Development & Innovation (REDI), Primary Health Care (SWE); General Practice, Family Medicine, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Pennbrant, Sandra
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Svensson, Ann
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Svenningsson, Irene
    Region Västra Götaland, Research, Education, Development & Innovation (REDI), Primary Health Care (SWE); General Practice, Family Medicine, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Standing together at the helm: how employees experience employee-driven innovation in primary car2024In: BMC Health Services Research, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Primary care needs to find strategies to deal with today’s societal challenges and continue to deliver efficient and high-quality care. Employee-driven innovation is increasingly gaining ground as an accessible pathway to developing successful and sustainable organisations. This type of innovation is characterised by employees being engaged in the innovation process, based on a bottom-up approach. This qualitative study explores employees’ experiences of employee-driven innovation at a primary care centre in Sweden. Data are collected by focus group interviews and analysed by inductive qualitative content analysis. The result is presented with the overarching theme “Standing together at the helm” followed by three categories: “Motivating factors for practising employee-driven innovation”, “Challenges in practising employee-driven innovation” and “Benefits of employee-driven innovation”, including nine subcategories. The study found that employee-driven innovation fosters organisational innovation, empowers employees, and enhances adaptability at personal and organisational levels. This enables individual and collective learning, and facilitates the shaping, development, and adaptation of working methods to meet internal and external requirements. However, new employees encountered difficulty grasping the concept of employee-driven innovation and recognising its long-term advantages. Additionally, the demanding and task-focused environment within primary care posed challenges in sustaining efforts in innovation work. The employees also experienced a lack of external support to drive and implement some innovative ideas.

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  • 9.
    Svensson, Ann
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Attitudes to Information Technology Among Healthcare Professions, 20092009In: 17th European Conference on Information Systems / [ed] Newell, S, Whitley, E A, Pouloudi, N, Wareham, J, Mathiassen, L, 2009, p. 2541-2554Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose is to explore attitudes towards IT among various categories of health care staff; health care professions. We will identify problem areas that may be the reasons for why different attitudes among different professions at a healthcare organisation exist, and subsequently we will analyse how this may have impact on how to understand and use IT. The research question is: What factors may explain differences regarding attitudes to IT among different professions in a health care organisation? The paper reports from a particular study of the “NU” healthcare organisation in west Sweden. The results reveal two main problem areas: the infrastructural and the socio-organisational, which are discussed as analytical implications for bridging the gaps between different professions in health care organisations.

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