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  • 1.
    Andersson, Jenny
    et al.
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg and Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Östra Hospital, Gothenburg (SWE) Region Västra Götaland, Department of Medicine Geriatrics and Emergency Medicine/Östra, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Rejnö, Åsa
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. Stroke unit, Department of Medicine, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde (SWE); Skaraborg institute for Research and Development, Skövde (SWE).
    Jakobsson, Sofie
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Hansson, Per-Olof
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg and Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Östra Hospital, Gothenburg (SWE) Region Västra Götaland, Department of Medicine Geriatrics and Emergency Medicine/Östra, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Nielsen, Susanne J
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg and Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Östra Hospital, Diagnosvägen 11, Gothenburg (SWE); Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Björck, Lena
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg and Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Östra Hospital, Gothenburg (SWE) Region Västra Götaland, Department of Medicine Geriatrics and Emergency Medicine/Östra, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (SWE); Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Symptoms at stroke onset as described by patients: a qualitative study2024In: BMC Neurology, E-ISSN 1471-2377, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Stroke is a common and severe disease that requires prompt care. Symptom expressions as one-sidedweakness and speech difficulties are common and included in public stroke campaigns. For some patients stroke canpresent with subtle and less common symptoms, difficult to interpret. The symptom severity assessed by the NationalInstitutes of Health Stroke Scale has decreased, and symptoms at onset may have changed. Therefore, we aimed toinvestigate how patients describe their symptoms at the onset of a first-time stroke.

    Methods:The study used a qualitative descriptive design and conventional content analysis. Data were collectedthrough recorded interviews with 27 patients aged 18 years and older hospitalised with a first-time stroke betweenOctober 2018 and April 2020. Data were analysed on a manifest level.

    Results: Symptoms at stroke onset were presented in two themes: Altered Reality and Discomfort and Changed BodyFunctions and described in five categories. Various types of symptoms were found. All symptoms were perceivedas sudden, persistent, and never experienced before and this appear as a “red thread” in the result. Regardless ofsymptom expressions, no specific symptom was described as more severe than another.

    Conclusions: Stroke symptoms were described with a variety of expressions. Many described complex symptomsnot typical of stroke, which can make it difficult to recognise the symptoms as a stroke and delay medical care. Publicstroke campaigns should emphasize the importance of seeking medical care at the slightest suspicion of stroke andcould be designed to help achieve this.

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  • 2.
    Berntsson, Shala Ghaderi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Uppsala University, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology, Medical Faculty, University of Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    Flensner, Gullvi
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level.
    Cerebellar ataxia and intrathecal baclofen therapy: Focus on patients´ experiences2017In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 2, no 6, article id e0180054Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elucidating patients´ experiences of living with chronic progressive hereditary ataxia and the symptomatic treatment with intrathecal baclofen (ITB) is the objective of the current study. A multicenter qualitative study with four patients included due to the rare combination of hereditary ataxia and ITB therapy was designed to elucidate participants' experiences through semi-structured interviews. The transcribed text was analyzed according to content analysis guidelines. Overall we identified living in the present/ taking one day at a time as the main theme covering the following categories: 1) Uncertainty about the future as a consequence of living with a hereditary disease; The disease; 2) Impact on life as a whole, 3) Influence on personal life in terms of feeling forced to terminate employment, 4) Limiting daily activities, and 5) ITB therapy, advantages, and disadvantages. Uncertainty about the future was the category that affected participants' personal life, employment, and daily activities. The participants' experience of receiving ITB therapy was expressed in terms of improved quality of life due to better body position and movement as well as better sleep and pain relief.

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  • 3.
    Gauffin, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neurology and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping, Sweden.
    Flensner, Gullvi
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Advanced Nursing.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Uppsala University, Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Being parents with epilepsy: thoughts on its consequences and difficulties affecting their children2015In: Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, ISSN 1176-6328, E-ISSN 1178-2021, Vol. 11, p. 1291-1298, article id NDT.S74222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Parents with epilepsy can be concerned about the consequences of epilepsy affecting their children. The aim of this paper is to describe aspects of what it means being a parent having epilepsy, focusing the parents’ perspectives and their thoughts on having children.

    Methods:

    Fourteen adults aged 18–35 years with epilepsy and subjective memory decline took part in focus-group interviews. The interviews were conducted according to a semi-structured guideline. Material containing aspects of parenthood was extracted from the original interviews and a secondary analysis was done according to a content-analysis guideline. Interviews with two parents for the Swedish book Leva med epilepsi [To live with epilepsy] by AM Landtblom (Stockholm: Bilda ide; 2009) were analyzed according to the same method.

    Results:

    Four themes emerged: (1) a persistent feeling of insecurity, since a seizure can occur at any time and the child could be hurt; (2) a feeling of inadequacy – of not being able to take full responsibility for one’s child; (3) acknowledgment that one’s children are forced to take more responsibility than other children do; and (4) a feeling of guilt – of not being able to fulfill one’s expectations of being the parent one would like to be.

    Conclusion:

    The parents with epilepsy are deeply concerned about how epilepsy affects the lives of their children. These parents are always aware that a seizure may occur and reflect on how this can affect their child. They try to foresee possible dangerous situations and prevent them. These parents were sad that they could not always take full responsibility for their child and could not live up to their own expectations of parenthood. Supportive programs may be of importance since fear for the safety of the child increases the psychosocial burden of epilepsy. There were also a few parents who did not acknowledge the safety issue of their child – the authors believe that it is important to identify these parents and provide extra information and support to them.

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  • 4.
    Karlsson, Frida
    et al.
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Sigurdardottir, Brynja
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - undergraduate level.
    Att leva med multipel skleros: En litteraturbaserad studie2022Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurological disease with a course of relapses causing physical and psychological disability that affects everyday life. A relapse is followed by an increased need of care. Persons can have different experiences of the disease that can be both positive and negative. The care contributed by the nurse is central and is experienced to be crucial for enabling increased health and decreased suffering for the person with MS.

    Aim: The aim of this study was to examine how persons with MS experience their daily living.

    Method: This literature-based study was founded on thirteen qualitative articles that focused on how persons with MS experienced living with the disease. The analysis of the articles was based on a model in five steps.

    Results: After analyzing the articles three main themes emerged. The result proved that multiple persons with MS experienced suffering and isolation related to a changed role in their everyday life, a lack of knowledge from the surrounding world and limited participation in their own care. Thus, health and quality of life could be experienced through acceptance of the disease as well as the new body despite its limitations.

    Conclusion: Persons with MS experienced an affected everyday life in both physical and psychological aspects which often caused suffering. To promote health, several of them found it necessary to invent strategies for coping with the disease. This could include participation, avoiding isolation and being offered individually adapted care. The nurse played a big role in the enabling of experiencing health despite the disease for persons with MS.

  • 5.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Travis, Frederick T.
    Maharishi University of Management, Center for Brain, Consciousness and Cognition, Fairfield, IN, United States.
    Exploring the connection between quality management and brain functioning2015In: The TQM Journal, ISSN 1754-2731, E-ISSN 1754-274X, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 565-575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore possible connections between brain functioning and quality management. Design/methodology/approach: Five central principles regarding brain functioning according to neuroscience are conceptually described and related to principles and major concepts in quality management with a special emphasis on Deming’s system of profound knowledge. Findings: The principles are shown to be related in a profound way. The first principle of coherence is closely related to appreciation for a system. The principle of homeostatic feedback loops concerns events that disturb the equilibrium of a system and is related to knowledge about variation. Neural plasticity is related to a theory of knowledge. The last two principles involve emotional and cognitive contributions to decision-making. They are closely related to the element psychology and one of them could lead to a further development of Deming’s system of profound knowledge. Research limitations/implications: The paper adds to the understanding of the role brain integration has for success in quality management efforts. A limitation is that it is difficult to localise higher-order thinking in brain function. Nonetheless, the research is indicative and provocative as a window to stimulate research into the fundamental basis of quality management success. Practical implications: The findings provide a deeper understanding of profound knowledge in quality management through relating it to how the brain is functioning, which is of value for quality managers and leaders striving for excellence for their organisations. Originality/value: The connection of brain principles with Deming’s profound knowledge has not been elaborated in the literature before. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 6.
    Landry, M.
    et al.
    University of Bordeaux, IINS, CNRS UMR 5297, Bordeaux, France.
    Bouchatta, O.
    Cadi Ayyad University, LPNB URAC 37, Marrakesh, Morocco.
    M’Hamed, S. B.
    Cadi Ayyad University, LPNB URAC 37, Marrakesh, Morocco.
    Bouali-Benazzouz, R.
    University of Bordeaux, IINS, CNRS UMR 5297, Bordeaux, France.
    Kerekes, Nora
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for health promotion and care sciences.
    Fossat, P.
    University of Bordeaux, IINS, CNRS UMR 5297, Bordeaux, France.
    Bennis, M.
    Cadi Ayyad University, LPNB URAC 37, Marrakesh, Morocco.
    Mechanisms of pain hypersensitivity in a pharmacological mouse model of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder2017In: Journal of Neurochemistry, ISSN 0022-3042, E-ISSN 1471-4159, Vol. 142, no 1, SI, article id WTH13-07Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Ljunggren, Sofia
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg (SWE) and Department of Neurology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Winblad, Stefan
    Department of Psychology, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg (SWE).
    Hällgren Graneheim, Ulla
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Section for nursing - graduate level. Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå (SWE).
    Malmgren, Kristina
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg (SWE) and Department of Neurology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (SWE) .
    Ozanne, Anneli
    Department of Neurology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (SWE) and Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (SWE) .
    Experiences of emotional and psychosocial functioning after frontal lobe resection for epilepsy.2021In: Epilepsy & Behavior, ISSN 1525-5050, E-ISSN 1525-5069, Vol. 121, no Pt A, article id 108077Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Frontal lobe resection (FLR) is the second most common epilepsy surgery procedure in adults. Few studies address neuropsychological consequences after FLR. The aim of this study was to explore patients' and relatives' experiences of cognitive, emotional and social cognitive functioning after frontal lobe epilepsy surgery.

    METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were held with 14 patients having gone through FLR as adults during the years 2000-2016 and 12 of their relatives. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analyzed with inductive qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: Positive as well as negative consequences were described both by patients and relatives. Feelings of relief and an increased capacity to experience emotions of well-being were mainly experienced as related to seizure freedom. A newfound autonomy and a more grown-up identity as opposed to a self-image based on epilepsy was also highlighted. However, results also showed that even for seizure free patients, FLR could give rise to negative experiences, the most prominent of which were mental fatigue, lowered mood and social withdrawal. Coping strategies included planning ahead to avoid mental exhaustion. Over all, respondents considered that the epilepsy surgery had been a risk well worth taking and that positive consequences outweighed the negative ones.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study shows a range of positive as well as negative outcomes after FLR for epilepsy. The findings indicate that lowered mood and mental fatigue could affect the life situation in a negative way, regardless of seizure outcome. This is important to consider in the preoperative counselling of patients and their families, as well as in the postsurgical follow-up. It is also crucial that the epilepsy surgery team has the possibility to offer rehabilitation and support to families regarding these aspects after surgery.

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    Elsevier OpenAccess
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