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  • 1.
    Dauman, Nicolas
    et al.
    University of Poitiers, France.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Carlsson, Sven G.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Habituation theories in current models of chronic tinnitus: evidence and criticism2013In: Habituation: theories, characteristics and biological mechanisms / [ed] Buskirk, Arie, New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc. , 2013, 1, p. 55-90Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    et al.
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Punzi, E.
    Department of Psychology, Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    A biased ADHD discourse ignores human uniqueness2017In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 12, article id 1319584Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Gauffin, Helena
    et al.
    Division of Neurology, Medical Faculty/IKE, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Flensner, Gullvi
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Division of Advanced Nursing.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Division of Neurology, Medical Faculty/IKE, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Living with epilepsy accompanied by cognitive difficulties: Young adults’ experiences2011In: Epilepsy & Behavior, ISSN 1525-5050, E-ISSN 1525-5069, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 750-758Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epilepsy can sometimes be followed by memory impairment. This can result from the underlying cause of epilepsy or from recurrent seizures, or can be a side effect of antiepileptic drugs or a symptom of another disease such as depression. The aim of the study described here was to explore the experience of living with epilepsy and subjective cognitive decline.

    Method

    To better understand the deeper meaning of the phenomenon, a qualitative design was chosen. Fourteen adults aged 18–35 took part in focus group interviews. The participants were divided into four groups, two groups of women and two groups of men, and the interviews were conducted according to a semistructured protocol. Transcripts were analyzed in accordance with the content analysis guidelines.

    Results

    Four themes emerged: “affecting the whole person,” “influencing daily life,” “affecting relationships,” and “meeting ignorance in society.”

    Conclusions

    Cognitive decline has a heavy impact on young adults with intractable epilepsy. In contrast to seizures, the cognitive decline is persistent. The themes reflected different hardships faced by the participants. The consequences of living with epilepsy and cognitive impairment concerned education, employment, social life, self-esteem, and hope for the future. The participants were already using strategies to cope with their cognitive decline, but may benefit from help in developing new strategies to better adjust to their memory problems. Development of more educational programs for both people with epilepsy and their relatives could improve their difficult situations. With help, people can learn to adjust their goals in life and live a fulfilling life despite the disease.

    Highlights

    ► Cognitive decline has a heavy impact on young adults with intractable epilepsy. ► It has consequences for employment, social life, self-esteem, and future plans. ► Participants employed many strategies to cope with their cognitive decline. ► Young people with epilepsy would benefit from help to better adjust to memory problems.

  • 4.
    Johansson, Birgitta
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, .
    Karlsson, Jan-Olof
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Rönnback, Lars
    University of Gothenburg, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, .
    Use the app-Measure mental fatigue-Take control2014In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 28, no 5-6, p. 574-574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVESFatigue after an acquired brain injury is common, and is characterized by limited energy reserves to accomplish ordinary daily activities. A typical characteristic of mental fatigue is that the mental exhaustion becomes pronounced during sensory stimulation or when cognitive tasks are performed for extended periods without breaks. There is a drain of mental energy upon mental activity in situations in which there is an invasion of the senses with an overload of impressions, and in noisy and hectic environments. Another typical feature is a disproportionally long recovery time needed to restore the mental energy levels after being mentally exhausted. The mental fatigue is also dependent on the total activity level as well as the nature of the demands of daily activities. For many people, there is an increased risk of doing too much and becoming even more fatigued.METHODSWe have developed an application for Windows Phone for assessment of mental fatigue. The Mental Fatigue Scale is used. The MFS is a multidimensional questionnaire containing 15 questions. The questions included in the MFS are based on symptoms described following longitudinal studies of patients with TBI, brain tumours, infections or inflammations in the nervous system, vascular brain diseases, and other brain disorders. The app also includes information about mental fatigue.   RESULTSThis application can help people determine the level of mental fatigue and it can also serve to provide an overall picture of the severity of the condition, and detect changes in mental fatigue over time. The scores will be added up and the results will be presented in the form of a rating scale and a diagram. People can then see their results for one week ago, one month ago or a whole year ago. Today, the most important recommendations are to adapt to the energy available by doing one thing at a time, resting regularly and not overdoing things. However, this is challenging for most people and it may take a long time, even years, to adapt to a sustainable level. It may also be difficult for the person to learn by himself/herself and it can take several years of considerable struggle, frustration, despair and depression, to find the right balance between rest and activity. This app can help people to be aware of mental fatigue. If they connect the results to daily activities, the app may also help them to be more aware about what may alleviate and what may make mental fatigue worse. CONCLUSIONSWith regular assessment of mental fatigue, this app may give feedback and support in order to achieve an enduring balance between activities and rest.

    The application can be downloaded without cost: http://www.windowsphone.com/en-us/store/app/mental-fatigue/87d4cb88-c9b5-4ac9-9a92-b63a5d8f4d82

  • 5.
    Kajonius, Petri
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    The Future of Personalized Care: Scientific, Measurement, and Practical Advancements in Personality and Brain Disorders2019In: Personality and Brain Disorders: Associations and Interventions / [ed] Garcia, Danilo; Archer, Trevor; Kostrzewa, Richard M., Springer International Publishing , 2019, p. 269-281Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Person-centered care sciences are experiencing rapid progress. Personalization in care services is becoming the norm, and implementation from scientific knowledge is increasingly acknowledged and mandated. Advances in personality and brain disorder research are crucial in assisting the future development of personalized care. Aim: We will attempt to present glimpses into the future of personalized care with support from frontline science, measurement, and practice, updating with input from personality genetics and measurement theory. Outline: We present three broad developments: (1) scientific advancements in understanding how personality and genetics are central in predicting mental health and disorders, with the potential to increase predictive diagnosis and treatment validity; (2) measurement advancements with help of trait dimensions and latent structures, with the potential to increase reliability in assessing personalized care needs and functioning; (3) practical advancements in implementing a personalized approach in care services, with the potential to increase effectiveness and satisfaction with patients. We review this glimpse into the future by referencing key findings in personality and assessment meta-analyses, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and trait measurements in psychiatric disorders. Conclusion: Personalizing care services will benefit practitioners and patients. We suggest and recommend that personalized care diagnosis and treatment is the way forward and that the future will be potentially revolutionized by incorporating the presented advancements in personality research and brain sciences.

  • 6.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Divison of Natural Sciences, Surveying and Mechanical Engineering.
    Lär känna din hjärna :: Recension av boken [Den sociala hjärnan  av Katarina Gospic.]2014In: Kvalitetsmagasinet, ISSN 1104-1579, no 3, p. 58-58Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Bokrecension av Gospic, Katarina (2014). Den sociala hjärnan. Stockholm: Bromberg

  • 7.
    Nehls, Eddy
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Business Administration.
    The Atomized Body. The cultural life of stem cells, genes and neurons. Max Liljefors, Susanne Lundin & Andréa Wiszmeg (red.). Nordic Academic Press Lund 2012. 228s. ill. ISBN 978-91-87121-92-02014In: RIG: Kulturhistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0035-5267, E-ISSN 2002-3863, Vol. 97, no 3, p. 172-175Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8. Travis, Frederick
    et al.
    Harung, Harald
    Oslo University College.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Moral development, Executive Functioning, Peak Experiences and Brain Pattern in Professional and Amateur Classical Musicians. Interpretation in light of a Unified Field Theory of Performance2011In: Consciousness and Cognition, ISSN 1053-8100, E-ISSN 1090-2376, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 1256-1264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study compared professional and amateur classical musicians matched for age, gender, and education on reaction times during the Stroop color-word test, brainwaves during an auditory ERP task and during paired reaction-time tasks, responses on the Gibbs Sociomoral Reflection questionnaire, and self-reported frequencies of peak experiences. Professional musicians were characterized by: (1) lower color-word interference effects (Stroop task), (2) faster categorization of rare expected stimuli (P3b), and a trend for faster processing of rare unexpected stimuli (P3a), (3) higher scores on the Sociomoral Reflection questionnaire, and (4) more frequent peak experiences during rest, tasks, and sleep. Both groups had high values on the Brain Integration Scale. These findings are interpreted in light of a Unified Theory of Performance, which posits that effectiveness in any area is influenced by one’s level of mind-brain development—emotional, cognitive, moral, ego and cortical development—with higher mind-brain development supporting greater effectiveness in any domain.

  • 9. Travis, Frederick
    et al.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    University West, Department of Engineering Science.
    Exploring Underlying Principles of Brain Functioning for Efficient Entreprenurial Organizing2011In: Uddevalla Symposium 2011 : Entrepreneurial knowledge, technology and transformation of regions: 16-18 june, Bergamo, Italy / [ed] Iréne Bernhard, 2011, p. 441-449Conference paper (Refereed)
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