Change search
Refine search result
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Dahlmo, K I
    et al.
    Nobel Biocare, Göteborg.
    Andersson, M
    Gellerstedt, M
    University West, Department of Economics and IT.
    Karlsson, S
    On a new method to assess the accuracy of a CAD program.2001In: International Journal of Prosthodontics, ISSN 0893-2174, E-ISSN 1139-9791, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 276-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: This study was initiated with the purpose of developing and evaluating a system for measuring the magnitude of the variation between a computer-aided design (CAD) object created on the computer screen and a replicated object produced by computer-aided manufacturing (CAM). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Controlled geometric forms, a square and a cone, were designed in a CAD program, and measuring distances were selected. The CAD data were transmitted to CAM data, and objects were produced. The CAD/CAM process was the Procera system, and the holder system permitted the objects to be ground into cross sections, similar to the visualization in the CAD program. Five objects of each shape were produced and measured by two operators two times. Three operators measured one of the objects 30 times. RESULTS: Observed values were greater than the true value. For all objects, the systematic error was at most 15.5 microns. Interoperator difference was small. The variation because of measurement error was greater for the square object compared to the cone. However, the variation because of object was higher for the cone object than for the square. The total standard deviation was 7.7 microns. Thus, the total random error caused by object variation and measurement error was in approximately 95% of all measurements less than 15 microns. CONCLUSION: There are no differences in the measurement data derived from this method and actual measurement data from an object created by the computer-aided dental design program. The method has high validity and reliability, i.e., high accuracy.

  • 2.
    Danielsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation and Computer Engineering.
    Gustavsson Christiernin, Linn
    University West, Department of Engineering Science.
    An Adaptable Process Planning Tool: A Tool for Information, Communication, and Interaction in a Robot Cell2011In: ADAPTIVE 2011: the Third International Conference on Adaptive and Self-Adaptive Systems and Applications / [ed] Fox, Jorge & Rausch, Andreas, International Academy, Research and Industry Association (IARIA), 2011, p. 15-19Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents work in progress on how to develop a process-planning tool to handle interaction between human operators and robots within a robot cell. First, we introduce how to include human activities in the process flow; then, we turn to our ideas for communication and feedback systems inside a robot cell. A small example of how to design interactive and re-programmable screens is presented.

  • 3.
    Gustavsson Christiernin, Linn
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Flexibla robotceller inom fordonsindustrin: Men hur ska informationsutbytet och interaktionen ske?2012In: Fordonskomponenten, ISSN 2000-7299, no 4, p. 26-28Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    En stor del av bilproduktionsprocessen är automatiserad. Ett fordons alla delar passerar flera olika stationer eller celler för att justeras och installeras, och robotar och människor har olika,vanligtvis separerade, uppgifter. Ett problem med denna typ av automatiserade produktion är den tid som det tar att vidta ändringar och frånvaron av medel hos den mänskliga operatören att kommunicera och interagera med roboten på ett flexibelt vis.

  • 4.
    Gustavsson Christiernin, Linn
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production System.
    Hartler, Johan
    Department of Shipping and Marine Technology Chalmers Technical University Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Multi-Layered Design and Game-Based Learning as a Pedagogical Concept: How to develop proper behavior in ARPA simulator training2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To become a professional master mariner one has to develop many different skills and have an understanding of how to act in different situations on the bridge. Within the master mariner program at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, simulation technologies are used to evolve pertinent skills within the educational program. A challenge with using a full scale simulator from the outset of the program is to get the students to develop both professional competencies and internalize tacit knowledge in the navigation of a ship when the interface of the simulator itself is quite demanding. By using an adaptive Multi-Layered Design approach in combination with game based learning, this paper proposes how to guide the student through a more summative learning process. The main idea is to grant limited access to what the students can do with some functions, and gradually turn on more functionality in order to develop certain experienced behaviors to get them to understand the logical approach behind selections and to make them think through why and when they should do things.

  • 5.
    Islind, Anna Sigridur
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Learning in home care: a digital artifact as a designated boundary object-in-use2017In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 29, no 7-8, p. 577-587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to understand how the role of an mHealth artifact plays out in home care settings. An mHealth artifact, in terms of a mobile app, was tested to see how the quality of home care work practice was enhanced and changed. The research question is: In what ways does an mHealth artifact re-shape a home care practice and how does this affect the interaction between caregivers and the elderly and learning opportunities for the caregivers? Design/methodology/approach: An action research approach was taken and the study was conducted in a home care organization in a Swedish municipality. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews and observations that were conducted during home visits. Concepts of learning and boundary objects were used to analyze and distinguish interactions and conversations with the mHealth artifact. Findings: The study shows how an mHealth artifact is re-shaping a home care practice and how this affects interactions and identifies learning opportunities. Views on the mHealth artifact as a designated boundary object as well as a boundary object-in-use must co-exist. Originality/value: The study provides qualitative descriptions from using an mHealth artifact for home care, which is an emerging area of concern for both research and practice. It focuses on the interactional and organizational values generated from the actual use of the designed mobile application. © 2017, © Emerald Publishing Limited.

  • 6.
    Johansson, Lars-Olof
    et al.
    Halmstad University, Halmstad.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Dynamics in a innovation boundary context: exploring an living lab process from a community of practice perspective2011In: Proceedings of OLKC 2011, Organisational Learning Knowledge Capabilities Conference, Hull, England, UK., OKLC , 2011, p. 1-15Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on a living lab process, which is an open, user-centric, innovation approach, where several actors from industry, user groups and academia are involved. The research question is: How can a boundary context, such as a living lab process, be nderstood and facilitated from a community of practice perspective? We aim to describe and analyze the dynamics in an innovation boundary context based on a living lab process. An an action-oriented research approach was applied and the empirical results are from The Find Project (TFP), with the aim of customizing an ICT product based on the needs of a user group. The findings are analyzed from a community of practice perspective where the three different communities i) researchers from Halmstad Living Lab (HLL), ii) ICT developers (ICTD), and iii) next of kin's to demented elderly persons (NOKD) represented the unit of analysis. The analysis indicates several boundary situations that played a vital role for the innovation process. The contribution of our research to innovation theory is a process model describing the dynamics in an innovation boundary context with regard to boundary objects-in-use as well as brokering. The process highlights two different levels of brokering: i) inner-level brokering; and ii) outer-level brokering.

  • 7.
    Johansson, Lars-Olof
    et al.
    Halmstad University, Halmstad.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Dynamics in an innovation boundary context: exploring a living labprocess from a community of practice perspective2011In: Proceedings of IRIS 2011: TUCS Lecture NotesNo 15, October 2011 / [ed] Leino, Timo, Turku: Turku Centre for Computer Science , 2011, p. 1-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on studies of a living lab process, which is an open, user-centric, innovation approach, where several actors from industry, user groups and academia are involved. We aim to describe and analyze the dynamics in an innovation boundary context based on a living lab process. An action-oriented research approach was applied and the empirical results are from The Find Project (TFP), with the aim of customizing an ICT product based on the needs of a user group. The findings are analyzed from a community of practice perspective where the three different communities i) researchers from Halmstad Living Lab (HLL), ii) ICT developers (ICTD), and iii) next of kin's to demented elderly persons (NOKD) represented the units of analysis. The analysis identified several boundary situations that played a vital role for the innovation process. The contribution of our research to innovation theory is a process model describing the dynamics in an innovation boundary context with regard to boundary objects-in-use as well as to brokering. The research highlights two different levels of brokering: i) product/service brokering; and ii) process brokering.

  • 8.
    Khorram-Manesh, Amir
    et al.
    Unit of Security and Preparedness, Former Prehospital and Disaster Medicine Center,Gothenburg,Sweden..
    Berlin, Johan
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies.
    Ljung Roseke, Lina
    Psychology Unit, Närhälsan, Borås, Sweden.
    Aremyr, Johan
    Unit of Security and Preparedness, Former Prehospital and Disaster Medicine Center,Gothenburg,Sweden..
    Sörensson, Josef
    Unit of Security and Preparedness,Former Prehospital and Disaster Medicine Center,Gothenburg,Sweden..
    Carlström, Eric
    Unit of Security and Preparedness, Former Prehospital and Disaster Medicine Center,Gothenburg,Sweden..
    Emergency Management and Preparedness Training for Youth (EMPTY): The Results of the First Swedish Pilot Study.2018In: Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness, ISSN 1935-7893, E-ISSN 1938-744X, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 685-688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the impact of a simulation training in raising a group of young students' personal and situational awareness in disasters and emergencies.

    METHODS: In total, 25 young students participated in two simulation scenarios representing two actual events, fire, and shooting, using a combination of two validated simulation training (Emergency Management and Preparedness Training for Youth [EMPTY]). The changes in their knowledge and awareness were evaluated by using questionnaires and the whole simulation was evaluated by three independent observers and a reference group.

    RESULTS: New concepts of emergency management, for example, evacuation, and barricading, could be trained in a safe environment. There was a significant increase in students' personal and situational awareness and their active engagement in the management of emergencies.

    CONCLUSION: EMPTY could raise the youth basic knowledge and ability to understand the concept of preparedness by being mentally prepared, available for collaboration, gaining a higher confidence, understanding the physical and psychological consequences of a major incident and the importance of their own safety. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2018; page 1 of 4).

  • 9.
    Svensson, Lars
    et al.
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Svanberg, Pia
    University West, Department of Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Learning Models in Online Education: On the Transformation from Tutors to Producers2010In: Proceedings of Global Learn Asia Pacific 2010 / [ed] Zoraini Wati Abas, Insung Jung & Joseph Luca, AACE , 2010, p. 3707-3712Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years online and blended learning has scaled up from being a pilot endeavor driven by pioneers, to constituting a large portion of many institutions of higher education. In the process, the conditions for the online teacher has gradually changed, and the situation of today is in many ways problematic where student interaction and dialogue has to stand back in favor of time consuming content production, material delivery, and technical problem solving. This paper draws on the experiences from a Scandinavian University to illustrate how this transition can be understood in the light of rapid technological development in combination with slow evolution of pedagogical models for online education.

1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf