Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 85
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Anderberg, Staffan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Pejryd, Lars
    3Production Technology Centre, Innovatum AB.
    A survey of metal working companies’ readiness for process planning performance measurements2009In: IEEE International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management, IEEM 8-11 sep, 2009, Hong-Kong, 2009, p. 1910-1914Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents an investigation regarding the potential and the readiness for implementing performance indicators and performance measurement systems of the process planning work for metal working companies. The paper is based on a questionnaire survey distributed to process planners in the Swedish metal working industry. The main outcome of the investigation is a foundation for understanding the implementation of performance measures of the process planning work for CNC machining. The survey revealed a few strengths and short comings in the studied companies.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Joel
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Review of Weldability of Precipitation Hardening Ni- and Fe-Ni-Based Superalloys2018In: Proceedings of the 9th International Symposium on Superalloy 718 & Derivatives: Energy, Aerospace, and Industrial Applications / [ed] Ott, E., Liu, X., Andersson, J., Bi, Z., Bockenstedt, K., Dempster, I., Groh, J., Heck, K., Jablonski, P., Kaplan, M., Nagahama, D. and Sudbrack, C., Springer, 2018, p. 899-916Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fabrication and welding of structural components for the hot section of aero-engines continues to be of high importance to the manufacturing industry of aero-engines. This paper discusses and reviews the literature on hot cracking and strain age cracking, cracking phenomena that can occur during welding or subsequent heat treatment of precipitation hardened Ni- and Fe-Ni-based superalloys. The influence of chemical composition in terms of i.e. hardening elements and impurities, microstructure of base material and weld zone, together with welding processes and corresponding parameters and heat input are discussed and related to the cracking susceptibility of different nickel based superalloys.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Joel
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Weldability of Ni-based Superalloys2014In: 8th International Symposium on Superalloy 718 and Derivatives: Conference Proceedings / [ed] Ott, E., Banik, A., Andersson, J., Dempster, I., Gabb, T., Groh, J., Heck, K., Helmink, R., Liu, X. & Wusatowska-Sarnek, A., Hoboken, NJ, USA: John Wiley & Sons, 2014, p. 249-262Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Andersson, Joel
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Raza, Shahzad
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology.
    Eliasson, Anders
    KTH, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology.
    Surreddi, Kumar Babu
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology.
    Solidification of Alloy 718, ATI 718Plus and Waspaloy2014In: 8th International Symposium on Superalloy 718 and Derivatives: Conference Proceedings / [ed] Ott, E., Banik, A., Andersson, J., Dempster, I., Gabb, T., Groh, J., Heck, K., Helmink, R., Liu, X. & Wusatowska-Sarnek, A, Hoboken, NJ, USA: John Wiley & Sons, 2014, p. 181-192Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Andersson, Joel
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes. Department of Materials Technology, Volvo Aero Corporation, Trollha¨ttan, Sweden and Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, G.
    Department of Materials Technology, Volvo Aero Corporation, Trollha¨ttan, Sweden and Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Repair welding of wrought superalloys: Alloy 718, Allvac 718Plus and Waspaloy2012In: Science and Technology of Welding and Joining, ISSN 1362-1718, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 49-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to weld repair three precipitation hardening superalloys, i.e. Alloy 718, Allvac 718Plus and Waspaloy, with gas tungsten arc welding, is compared in this study. Four different solution heat treatment conditions for each material were examined: Alloy 718 and Allvac 718Plus heat treated at 954uC–1 h, 982uC–1 h, 954uC–15 h and 1020uC–1 h and Waspaloy for 4 h at 996uC, 1010uC, 1040uC and at 1080uC. By metallography, the total number of cracks was evaluated in both the heat affected zone and the fusion zone, which made it possible to consistently rate the repair weldability of these three materials. Alloy 718 was significantly the best one, with Allvac 718Plus slightly better than Waspaloy. As expected, the solution heat treatment conditions only affected the heat affected zone cracking behaviour.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Joel
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Sjöberg, G.
    Brederholm, A.
    Hänninen, H.
    Solidification Cracking of Alloy Allvac 718Plus and Alloy 718 at Transvarestraint Testing2010In: EPD Congress 2008: Proceedings of Sessions and Symposia Sponsored by the Extraction and Processing Division (EPD) / [ed] Stanley M. Howard, Wiley-Blackwell, 2010, p. 157-169Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Andersson, Joel
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Sjöberg, G.
    Chaturvedi, M.
    Hot Ductility Study of Haynes 282 Superalloy2010In: Superalloy 718 and Derivatives: Proceedings of the 7th International Symposium on Superalloy 718 and Derivatives / [ed] E. A. Ott, J. R. Groh, A. Banik, I. Dempster, T. P. Gabb, R. Helmink, X. Liu, A. Mitchell, G. P. Sjöberg and A. Wusatowska-Sarnek, The Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society, 2010, p. 539-554Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Andersson, Joel
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Sjöberg, G.
    Hatami, S.
    Notch Sensitivity and Intergranular Crack Growth in the Allvac 718Plus Superalloy2007In: XVIII International Symposium on Air Breathing Engines (ISABE): Beijing, China, 2-7 September 2007, 2007, p. n.1293-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Andersson, Joel
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes. Volvo Aero Corporation, Trollhättan, Sweden och Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, G.
    Volvo Aero Corporation, Trollhättan, Sweden och Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hänninen, H.
    Aalto University School of Science and Technology, Espoo, Finland.
    Metallurgical Response of Electron Beam Welded Allvac® 718Plus™2011In: Hot Cracking Phenomena in Welds III / [ed] Lippold, J., Böllinghaus, T. and Cross C. E., Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011, p. 415-428Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electron beam welding of forged Allvac 718Plus superalloy has been carried out without any visible cracks in weld cross-sections. Healed cracks in the heat affected zone were, however, seen in most cross-sections with the healing as well as the cracking believed to be due to the constitutional liquation of the δ-phase. The δ-phase undergoes constitutional liquation in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and consequently decreases the ductility of the material and renders cracks in the HAZ but due to the large amount of eutectic liquid produced at the same time the healing of the opened cracks takes place.

  • 10.
    Andersson, Joel
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes. Volvo Aero Corporation, Materials Technology Department, Trollhättan, Sweden och Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Göteborg,Sweden.
    Sjöberg, G.
    Volvo Aero Corporation, Materials Technology Department, Trollhättan, Sweden och Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Larsson, J.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Göteborg,Sweden.
    Investigation of Homogenization and its Influence on the Repair Welding of Cast Allvac 718Plus(®)2010In: Superalloy 718 and Derivatives: Proceedings of the 7th International Symposium on Superalloy 718 and Derivatives / [ed] E. A. Ott, J. R. Groh, A. Banik, I. Dempster, T. P. Gabb, R. Helmink, X. Liu, A. Mitchell, G. P. Sjöberg, and A. Wusatowska-Sarnek, The Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society, 2010, p. 439-454Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Andersson, Joel
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Sjöberg, G.
    Viskari, L.
    Brederholm, A.
    Hänninen, H.
    Knee, C.
    Hot Cracking of Allvac 718Plus, Alloy 718 and Waspaloy at Varestraint Testing2008In: 4th International Symposium on Aerospace Materials and Manufacturing Processes: Advances in Processing and Repair of Aerospace Materials 2008 / [ed] M. Jahazi, M. Elboujdaini and P. Patnaik, Montreal: Canadian Institute of Mining, Metallurgy and Petroleum, 2008, p. 401-413Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Varestraint testing together with DSC and SEM-EDX analyses have been performed as means of investigating the hot cracking susceptibility of Allvac 718Plus, alloy 718 and Waspaloy. The solidification sequences in Allvac 718Plus and alloy 718 were very similar to each other starting by an initial solidification of the gamma phase, gamma/MC reaction at around 1260°C and then finally ending the sequence by gamma/Laves eutectic reaction at around 1150°C. Waspaloy had the same solidification sequence, except no Laves phase formation takes place, and solidification started at a somewhat higher temperature as compared to alloy 718 and the solidification sequence ends by a gamma/MC reaction at around 1245°C. The total amount of hot cracking in Waspaloy was shown to be much less than that in alloy 718 and in Allvac 718Plus which is believed to be related to the presence of the Laves eutectic in the latter two alloys with corresponding larger solidification ranges. Hot cracking of 718Plus is slightly less than in 718.

  • 12.
    Andersson, Joel
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes. Department of Materials Technology, GKN Aerospace Engine Systems, Trollhättan, Sweden och Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, G.
    Department of Materials Technology, GKN Aerospace Engine Systems, Trollhättan, Sweden och Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Viskari, L.
    Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Chaturvedi, M. C.
    Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
    Effect of Different Solution Heat Treatments on the Hot Ductility of Superalloys: Part 3 - Waspaloy2013In: Materials Science and Technology, ISSN 0267-0836, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 43-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The susceptibility to heat affected zone cracking of Waspaloy has been investigated in terms of its hot ductility, measured as the reduction of area (RA). Gleeble testing with on-heating as well as on-cooling test cycles was carried out to illuminate the influence of different 4 h solution heat treatments between 996 and 1080°C. A ductility maximum of between 80 and 90%RA was found at 1050–1100°C for all conditions in the on-heating tests. Although the different heat treatment conditions showed similar macrohardness, the particle size and distribution of the γ′ and M23C6 phases differed, which significantly affected the on-heating ductility in the lower temperature test region. The ductile to brittle transition was initiated at 1100°C in the on-heating testing with indications of grain boundary liquation at the higher test temperatures. Ductility recovery, as measured in the on-cooling tests from 1240°C, was very limited with <30%RA for all conditions and test temperatures except for the 1080°C/4 h treatment, which exhibited 60%RA at 980°C.

  • 13.
    Andersson, Joel
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes. Department of Materials Technology, Volvo Aero Corporation, Trollhättan, Sweden and Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, G.
    Department of Materials Technology, Volvo Aero Corporation, Trollhättan, Sweden and Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Viskari, L.
    Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Chaturvedi, M.C.
    Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
    Effect of different solution heat treatments on hot ductility of superalloys: Part 2 – Allvac 718Plus2012In: Materials Science and Technology, ISSN 0267-0836, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 733-741Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hot ductility of Allvac 718Plus for different solution heat treatments (954°C–15 h, 954°C–1 h, 982°C–1 h and 1050°C–3 h+954°C–1 h) has been investigated using Gleeble testing. Substantial variations in the microstructure among the heat treatments affected the Gleeble test hot ductility only to a very limited extent. Constitutional liquation of the NbC phase was found to be the main cause for the poor ductility at high testing temperatures in the on-heating cycle as well as at the lower temperatures on-cooling. Grain boundary δ phase was seen to assist the constitutional liquation of the NbC phase. Based on established evaluation criteria for Gleeble ductility testing, a ranked indicator for weldability is suggested.

  • 14.
    Andersson, Joel
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes. Department of Materials Technology at Volvo Aero Corporation, Trollhättan, and Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, G.
    Department of Materials Technology at Volvo Aero Corporation, Trollhättan, and Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Viskari, L.
    Department of Microscopy and Microanalysis at Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Chaturvedi, M.C.
    Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 5V6 Canada.
    Effect of solution heat treatments on superalloys: Part 1 – alloy 7182012In: Materials Science and Technology, ISSN 0267-0836, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 609-619Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hot ductility as measured by Gleeble testing of Alloy 718 at four different solution heat treatments (954°C/15 h, 954°C/1 h, 982°C/1 h and 1050°C/3 h+954°C/1 h) has been investigated. It is concluded that constitutional liquation of NbC assisted by δ phase takes place and deteriorates the ductility. Parameters established by analysing the ductility dependence on temperature indicate a reduced weldability of the material in the coarse grain size state (ASTM 3) while indicating an increased weldability when containing a large amount of δ phase due to a grain boundary pinning effect. The accumulation of trace elements during grain growth at the highest temperature is believed to be the cause for the observed reduced on-cooling ductility.

  • 15.
    Andersson, Joel
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Vikström, Fredrik
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems.
    Pettersson, Bengt
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems.
    HIP-Densification of Alloy 718 and ATI 718Plus2014In: 8th International Symposium on Superalloy 718 and Derivatives: Conference Proceedings / [ed] Ott, E., Banik, A., Andersson, J., Dempster, I., Gabb, T., Groh, J., Heck, K., Helmink, R., Liu, X. & Wusatowska-Sarnek, A., Hoboken, NJ, USA: John Wiley & Sons, 2014, p. 425-436Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Asala, G.
    et al.
    University of Manitoba, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Andersson, Joel
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Ojo, Olanrewaju
    University of Manitoba, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Microstructure Dependence of Dynamic Impact Behaviour of ATI 718plus® Superalloy2018In: Proceedings of the 9th International Symposium on Superalloy 718 & Derivatives: Energy, Aerospace, and Industrial Applications / [ed] Ott, E., Liu, X., Andersson, J., Bi, Z., Bockenstedt, K., Dempster, I., Groh, J., Heck, K., Jablonski, P., Kaplan, M., Nagahama, D. and Sudbrack, C., Springer, 2018, p. 369-378Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ATI 718Plus® is a γ′-strengthened nickel-based superalloy developed to substitute the widely used Alloy 718 in aero-engine applications. This newer superalloy is a candidate material for aero-engine turbine structures, with the requirement to withstand impact loading occurring at high strain rates during turbine blade out events. Furthermore, the understanding of the high strain rate response of ATI 718Plus® is important in optimising its machinability during cutting operations. To predict and model the behaviour of ATI 718Plus® during these events and in other dynamic impact applications, proper understanding of the high strain rate behaviour of the alloy is important, but not presently available. Therefore, in this work, the influence of microstructural condition and strain rates on dynamic impact behaviour of ATI 718Plus®, using a modified version of direct impact Hopkinson bar, is investigated. It is observed that the age-hardened alloy exhibits a significantly reduced strain hardening and strain rate hardening capabilities compared to the solution heat treated microstructure. Furthermore, microstructural examination of the deformed samples shows that the formation of adiabatic shear bands, which usually serve as damage nucleation site, is substantially suppressed in the solution heat treated microstructure, while the aged microstructure exhibits high propensity to form localised shear bands.

  • 17.
    Asala, G.
    et al.
    University of Manitoba, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Khan, A. K.
    University of Manitoba, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Andersson, Joel
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mechanical Engineering. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Ojo, O. A.
    University of Manitoba, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Microstructural Analyses of ATI 718Plus® Produced by Wire-ARC Additive Manufacturing Process2017In: Metallurgical and Materials Transactions. A, ISSN 1073-5623, E-ISSN 1543-1940, Vol. 48A, no 9, p. 4211-4228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A detailed microstructural study of ATI 718Plus superalloy produced by the wire-arc additive manufacturing (WAAM) process was performed through the use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Extensive formation of eutectic solidification microconstituents including Laves and MC-type carbide phases, induced by micro-segregation, are observed in the build of the alloy in the as-deposited condition. Notwithstanding the significant segregation of niobium (Nb), which has been reported to promote the formation of the delta-phase in ATI 718Plus, only eta-phase particles are observed in the deposit. Excessive precipitation of eta-phase particles is found to be linked to Laves phase particles that are partially dissolved in the deposit after post-deposition heat treatment (PDHT). The EBSD analysis shows a high textured build in the aOE (c) 100 > directions with only a few misoriented grains at the substrate-deposit boundary and the top of the deposit. Investigation on the hardness of the build of the alloy, in the as-deposited condition, showed a softened zone about 2 mm wide at the deposited metal heat affected zone (DMHAZ), which has not been previously reported and potentially damaging to the mechanical properties. An extensive analysis with the use of both microstructural characterization tools and theoretical calculations shows that the DMHAZ has the lowest volume fraction of strengthening precipitates (gamma’ and gamma aEuro(3)) in terms of their number density, which therefore induces the observed softness. Delayed re-precipitation kinetics and the extent of the precipitation of gamma’ and gamma aEuro(3) in the DMHAZ which is related to the diffusion of segregated solute elements from the interdendritic regions are attributed to this phenomenon. The microstructural analyses discussed in this work are vital to adequate understanding of properties of ATI 718Plus produced by the additive manufacturing process technique.

  • 18.
    Bahbou, M. Fouzi
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Mechanical Engineering.
    A study of the adhesion strength of plasma sprayed coatings2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Bahbou, M. Fouzi
    et al.
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Mechanical Engineering.
    Choquet, Isabelle
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Mechanical Engineering.
    Clement, Uta
    Numerical and experimental study of Ni-particle impact on a ti-surfaceIn: Journal of thermal spray technology (Print), ISSN 1059-9630, E-ISSN 1544-1016Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Bahbou, M. Fouzi
    et al.
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Mechanical Engineering.
    Choquet, Isabelle
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Mechanical Engineering.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Mechanical Engineering.
    Numerical and Experimental Study of Ni-Particle Impact On A Ti-Surface2007In: Proceedings of the International Thermal Spray Conference: May 2007, Beijing, China, ASM International , 2007, p. 219-224Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Bandyopadhyay, Robi
    University West, Department of Technology.
    Modelling of the flame spraying process2003Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Barick, Prasenjit
    et al.
    International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials, Balapur Post, Hyderabad, 500005 Telangana, India.
    Chakravarty, Dibyendu
    International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials, Balapur Post, Hyderabad, 500005 Telangana, India.
    Saha, Bhaskar Prasad
    International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials, Balapur Post, Hyderabad, 500005 Telangana, India.
    Nitra, Rahul
    Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur, 721302 West Bengal, India.
    Joshi, Shrikant
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials, Balapur Post, Hyderabad, 500005 Telangana, India.
    Effect of pressure and temperature on densification, microstructure and mechanical properties of spark plasma sintered silicon carbide processed with β-silicon carbide nanopowder and sintering additives2016In: Ceramics International, ISSN 0272-8842, E-ISSN 1873-3956, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 3836-3848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of applied pressure and temperature during spark plasma sintering (SPS) of additive-containing nanocrystalline silicon carbide on its densification, microstructure, and mechanical properties have been investigated. Both relative density and grain size are found to increase with temperature. Furthermore, with increase in pressure at constant temperature, the relative density improves significantly, whereas the grain size decreases. Reasonably high relative density (~96%) is achieved on carrying out SPS at 1300 °C under applied pressure of 75 MPa for 5 min, with a maximum of ~97.7% at 1500 °C under 50 MPa for 5 min. TEM studies have shown the presence of an amorphous phase at grain boundaries and triple points, which confirms the formation of liquid phase during sintering and its significant contribution to densification of SiC at relatively lower temperatures (≤1400 °C). The relative density decreases on raising the SPS temperature beyond 1500 °C, probably due to pores caused by vaporization of the liquid phase. Whereas β-SiC is observed in the microstructures for SPS carried out at temperatures ≤1500 °C, α-SiC evolves and its volume fraction increases with further increase in SPS temperatures. Both hardness and Young׳s modulus increase with increase in relative density, whereas indentation fracture toughness appears to be higher in case of two-phase microstructure containing α and β-SiC.

  • 23.
    Beno, Thomas
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Isaksson, Marina
    Pejryd, Lars
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Investigation of Machining Greek Ascaloy with Minimal Quantity Lubrication Sustainable/Cleaner Manufacturing2008In: LCE 2008: 15th CIRP International Conference on Life Cycle Engineering: Conference Proceedings, Sidney, 17-19 March, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Bolelli, G.
    et al.
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria “Enzo Ferrari”, Via Pietro Vivarelli 10/1, I-41125 Modena (MO), Italy.
    Berger, L. -M
    Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik (IWS), Winterbergstr. 28, D-01277 Dresden, Germany.
    Börner, T.
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria “Enzo Ferrari”, Via Pietro Vivarelli 10/1, I-41125 Modena (MO), Italy.
    Koivuluoto, H.
    Tampere University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, Korkeakoulunkatu 6, FI-33720 Tampere, Finland.
    Lusvarghi, L.
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria “Enzo Ferrari”, Via Pietro Vivarelli 10/1, I-41125 Modena (MO), Italy.
    Lyphout, Christophe
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Matikainen, V.
    Tampere University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, Korkeakoulunkatu 6, FI-33720 Tampere, Finland.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Sassatelli, P.
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria “Enzo Ferrari”, Via Pietro Vivarelli 10/1, I-41125 Modena (MO), Italy.
    Trache, R.
    Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik (IWS), Winterbergstr. 28, D-01277 Dresden, Germany.
    Vuoristo, P.
    Tampere University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, Korkeakoulunkatu 6, FI-33720 Tampere, Finland.
    Tribology of HVOF- and HVAF-sprayed WC-10Co4Cr hardmetal coatings: A comparative assessment2015In: Surface and Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, Vol. 265, p. 125-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    his paper provides a comprehensive assessment of the sliding and abrasive wear behaviour of WC–10Co4Cr hardmetal coatings, representative of the existing state-of-the-art. A commercial feedstock powder with two different particle size distributions was sprayed onto carbon steel substrates using two HVOF and two HVAF spray processes.Mild wear rates of < 10-7 mm3/(Nm) and friction coefficients of ≈ 0.5 were obtained for all samples in ball-on-disk sliding wear tests at room temperature against Al2O3 counterparts. WC–10Co4Cr coatings definitely outperform a reference electrolytic hard chromium coating under these test conditions. Their wear mechanisms include extrusion and removal of the binder matrix, with the formation of a wavy surface morphology, and brittle cracking. The balance of such phenomena is closely related to intra-lamellar features, and rather independent of those properties (e.g. indentation fracture toughness, elastic modulus) which mainly reflect large-scale inter-lamellar cohesion, as quantitatively confirmed by a principal component analysis. Intra-lamellar dissolution of WC into the matrix indeed increases the incidence of brittle cracking, resulting in slightly higher wear rates. At 400 °C, some of the hardmetal coatings fail because of the superposition between tensile residual stresses and thermal expansion mismatch stresses (due to the difference between the thermal expansion coefficients of the steel substrate and of the hardmetal coating). Those which do not fail, on account of lower residual stresses, exhibit higher wear rates than at room temperature, due to oxidation of the WC grains.The resistance of the coatings against abrasive wear, assessed by dry sand–rubber wheel testing, is related to inter-lamellar cohesion, as proven by a principal component analysis of the collected dataset. Therefore, coatings deposited from coarse feedstock powders suffer higher wear loss than those obtained from fine powders, as brittle inter-lamellar detachment is caused by their weaker interparticle cohesion, witnessed by their systematically lower fracture toughness as well.

  • 25.
    Broberg, Patrik
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mechanical Engineering.
    Surface crack detection in welds using thermography2013In: NDT & E international, ISSN 0963-8695, E-ISSN 1879-1174, Vol. 57, p. 69-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermography is today used within non-destructive testing for detecting several different types of defects. The possibility for using thermography for detecting surface cracks in welded metal plates has here been investigated. During testing the weld is illuminated using a high power infrared light source. Due to surface cracks acting like black bodies, they will absorb more energy than the surrounding metal and can be identified as a warmer area when imaged using an infrared camera. Notches as well as real longitudinal cold cracks in a weld are investigated using the presented method. The results show that thermography is promising as a method for detection cracks open to the surface.

  • 26.
    Broberg, Patrik
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Runnemalm, Anna
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Analysis algorithm for surface crack detection by thermography with UV light excitation2016In: Quantitative InfraRed Thermography 2016: Abstracts / [ed] Kaczmarek, M. & Bujnowski, A., Gdańsk, Poland: Publishing Gdańsk University of Technology , 2016, p. 144-149Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface crack defects can be detected by IR thermograpgy due to the high absorption of energy within the crack cavity. It is often difficult to detect the defect in the raw data, since the signal easily drowns in the background. It is therefore important to have good analysis algorithms that can reduce the background and enhance the defect. Here an analysis algorithm is presented which significantly increases the signal to noise ratio of the defects and reduces the image sequence from the camera to one image.

  • 27.
    Charles, Corinne
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Mechanical Engineering.
    Modelling Microstructure Evolution in Weld Deposited Titanium2007In: NAFEMS Contact Nordic Countries, 2007, NAFEMS Nordic seminar; 4 (Oslo): 2007.03.20-21, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Charles, Corinne
    et al.
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Mechanical Engineering.
    Järvstråt, Niklas
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Mechanical Engineering.
    Development of a Microstructure Model for Metal Deposition of Titanium Alloy Ti-6Al-4V2007In: Ti-2007 : science and technology : proceedings of the 11th World Conference on Titanium (JIMIC 5): held at Kyoto International Conference Center, Kyoto, Japan, 3 - 7 June 2007, 2007, p. 1201-1205Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Charles, Corinne
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Järvstråt, Niklas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Modelling Ti-6Al-4V microstructure by evolution laws implemented as finite element subroutines:: Application to TIG metal deposition2008In: 8 th International Conference on Trends in welding research,: Pine Mountain, Georgia, June 2-6, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Choquet, Isabelle
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Björklund, Stefan
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    Volvo Aero Corporation, Trollhättan.
    Wigren, Jan
    Volvo Aero Corporation, Trollhättan.
    Clogging and lump formation during atmospheric plasma spraying with powder injection downstream the plasma gun2007In: Journal of thermal spray technology (Print), ISSN 1059-9630, E-ISSN 1544-1016, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 512-523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to numerically and experimentally investigate lump formation during atmospheric plasma spraying with powder injection downstream the plasma gun exit. A first set of investigations was focused on the location and orientation of the powder port injector. It turned out impossible to keep the coating quality while avoiding lumps by simply moving the powder injector. A new geometry of the powder port ring holder was designed and optimized to prevent nozzle clogging, and lump formation using a gas screen. This solution was successfully tested for applications with Ni-5wt.%Al and ZrO2-7wt.%Y2O3 powders used in production. The possible secondary effect of plasma jet shrouding by the gas screen, and its consequence on powder particles prior to impact was also studied.

  • 31.
    Edstorp, Marcus
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Mechanical Engineering.
    A Simplifed Finite Element Formulation for Spray Transfer GMA Weld Pools2008In: Progress in Industrial Mathematics at ECMI 2006, Springer , 2008, p. 822-826Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter is concerned with the matter of mathematically modelling and computationally simulating the thermo and fluid dynamical phenomena occuring in the workpiece during a gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process, and does so by employing a continuum mechanical approach and a finite element formulation for approximating the solution of equations expressing the continuity of mass, the balance of linear momentum, the conservation of energy and the motion of the weld pool surface. GMAW is an electrode arc fusion welding process. The designation arc fusion signifies that an electric arc is struck between the welding electrode and the workpiece, and this causes the base material to melt on either side of the joint. During the subsequent solidification this will cause fusion between the workpiece parts. The electrode consist in a filler metal, and it is hence consumed during the process and molten droplets are, under the influence of electromagnetical and gravitational forces, transferred to the liquid weld pool. Mass is thus added to the workpiece and this causes a reinforcement of the joint.

  • 32.
    Ericsson, Mikael
    et al.
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Mechanical Engineering.
    Bolmsjö, Gunnar
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation Systems.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Three-dimensional simulation of robot path and heat transfer of a TIG-welded part with complex geometry2002In: 11th International Conferences on Computer Technology in Welding: Colombus, Ohio December 6-7, 2001, 2002, p. 309-316Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The application of commercial software (OLP) packages for robot simulation, and programming, use interactive computer graphics, provide powerful tools for creating welding paths off-line. By the use of such software, problems of robot reach, accessibility, collision and timing can be eliminated during the planning stage. This paper describes how such software can be integrated with a numerical model that predicts temperature-time histories in the solid material. The objective of this integration is to develop a tool for the engineer where robot trajectories and process parameters can be optimized on parts with complex geometry. Such a tool would decrease the number of weld trials, increase productivity and reduce costs. Assumptions and principles behind the modeling techniques are presented together with experimental evaluation of the correlation between modeled and measured temperatures.

  • 33.
    Fahlström, Karl
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Laser welding of boron steels for light-weight vehicle applications2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Laser beam welding has gained a significant interest during the last two decades. The suitability of the process for high volume production has the possibility to give a strong advantage compared to several other welding methods. However, it is important to have the process in full control since various quality issues may otherwise occur. During laser welding of boron steels quality issues such as imperfections, changes in local and global geometry as well as strength reduction can occur. The aspects that need to be considered are strongly depending on alloy content, process parameters etc. These problems that can occur could be fatal for the construction and the lowest level of occurrence is wanted, independent of industry.

    The focus of this study has been to investigate the properties of laser welded boron steel. The study includes laser welding of boron alloyed steels with strengths of 1500 MPa and a recently introduced 1900 MPa grade. Focus has been to investigate weldability and the occurrence of cracks, porosity and strength reducing microstructure that can occur during laser welding, as well as distortion studies for tolerances in geometry. The results show that both conventional and 1900 MPa boron alloyed steel are suitable for laser welding.

    Due to the martensitic structure of welds the material tends to behave brittle. Cracking and porosity do not seem to be an issue limiting the use of these steels. For tolerances in geometry for larger structures tests has been done simulating laser welding of A-pillars and B-pillars. Measurements have been done with Vernier caliper as well as a more advanced optical method capturing the movements during the welding sequence. Results from the tests done on Ushaped beams indicates that depending on the geometry of the structure and heat input distortions can be controlled to give distortions from 1 to 8 mm, at a welding length of 700 mm. This means that important geometry points can be distorted several millimeters if the laser welding process not is controlled.

  • 34.
    Fahlström, Karl
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. Swerea KIMAB, Joining Technology, Kista, Sweden .
    Andersson, Oscar
    Volvo Cars, Torslanda; XPRES, KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Todal, Urban
    Volvo Cars, Torslanda.
    Melander, Arne
    Swerea KIMAB, Joining Technology, Kista; XPRES, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.
    Minimization of distortions during laser welding of ultra-high strength steel2014In: ICALEO 2014 Congress proceedings, 2014, p. 1-10Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultra high strength steels are frequently used within the automotive industry for several components. Welding of these components is traditionally done by resistance spot welding, but to get further productivity and increased strength, laser welding has been introduced in the past decades. Fusion welding is known to cause distortions due to built-in stresses in the material. The distortions result in geometrical issues during assembly which become the origin of low joint quality due to gaps and misfits.

    U-beam structures of boron steel simulating B-pillars have been welded with laser along the flanges. Welding parameters and clamping have been varied to create different welding sequences and heat input generating a range of distortion levels. The distortions have been recorded dynamically with an optical measurement system during welding. In addition, final distortions have been measured by a digital Vernier caliper. The combined measurements give the possibility to evaluate development, occurrence and magnitude of distortions with high accuracy. Furthermore, section cuts have been analyzed to assess joint geometry and metallurgy.

    The results shows that final distortions appear in the range of 0-8 mm. Distortions occur mainly transversely and vertically along the profile. Variations in heat input show clear correlation with the magnitude of distortions and level of joint quality. A higher heat input in general generates a higher level of distortion with the same clamping conditions. Section cuts show that weld width and penetration are significantly affected by welding heat input.

    The present study identifies parameters which significantly influence the magnitude and distribution of distortions. Also, effective measures to minimize distortions and maintain or improve joint quality have been proposed.

    Finally, transient FE simulations have been presented which show the behavior of the profiles during the welding and unclamping process.

  • 35.
    Fargas, G.
    et al.
    Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, CIEFMA/EEBE, Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metal·lúrgica, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain.
    Roa, J.J.
    Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, CIEFMA/EEBE, Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallúrgica, Barcelona, Spain.
    Sefer, B.
    Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, CIEFMA/EEBE, Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallúrgica, Barcelona, Spain, Luleå University of Technology, Division of Materials Science, S-97187 Luleå, Sweden.
    Pederson, Robert
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Antti, M.-L.
    Luleå University of Technology, Division of Materials Science, S-97187 Luleå, Sweden.
    Mateo, A.
    Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, CIEFMA/EEBE, Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallúrgica, Barcelona, Spain.
    Oxidation behavior of TI-6Al-4V alloy exposed to isothermal and cyclic thermal treatments2017In: Proceedings of the conference METAL 2017, TANGER Ltd. , 2017, p. 1573-1579Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most common titanium alloys for aerospace industry is Ti-6Al-4V (usually designed as Ti-64) which is used for manufacturing aero-engine components, such as fan discs, compressor discs, blades andstators. The maximum service temperature for this alloy is limited partly because of degradation of mechanical properties at elevated temperatures (above 480 ºC). During the first stage of oxidation the oxidescale is protective, whereas after prolonged oxidation time it loses its protective nature and favours higher diffusion of oxygen through the oxide. In the present study, cyclic thermal treatments were performed in air at 500 and 700 ºC, up to 500 hours, and compared with similar studies carried out on isothermal oxidation conditions. The evolution of the surface oxidation was analyzed by metallographic techniques and X-ray diffraction, together with a detailed advanced characterization of the microstructure by Scanning Electron Microscopy and Focus Ions Beam. The results point out that the cyclic thermal treatments induced a strong increase of the weight gain compared to isothermal treatments. The analysis of the oxide scale revealed not only the presence of rutile, at 700 ºC, but also anatase and TiOx at 500 ºC for both isothermal and cyclic thermal treatments. At 700 ºC, thermal stress caused by cyclic thermal treatments promoted the fracture of the oxide after the first 20 hours.

  • 36.
    Fisk, Martin
    et al.
    Malmö Högskola.
    Lundbäck, Andreas
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    Andersson, Joel
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Lindgren, Lars-Erik
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    Finite Element Analysis Using a Dislocation Density Based Flow Stress Model Coupled with Model for Precipitate Evolution2014In: 8th International Symposium on Superalloy 718 and Derivatives / [ed] E. Ott, A. Banik, J. Andersson, I. Dempster, T. Gabb, J. Groh, K. Heck, R. Helmink, X. Liu och A. Wusatowska-Sarnek, Hoboken, NJ, USA: John Wiley & Sons, 2014, p. 155-168Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Haas, Sylvio
    et al.
    Photon Science, DESY, Hamburg, Germany.
    Andersson, Joel
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Fisk, Martin
    Malmö University, Materials Science and Applied Mathematics, Malmö, Sweden Division of Solid Mechanics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Park, Jun-Sang
    X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, USA.
    Lienert, Ulrich
    Photon Science, DESY, Hamburg, Germany.
    Correlation of precipitate evolution with Vickers hardness in Haynes® 282® superalloy: In-situ high-energy SAXS/WAXS investigation2018In: Materials Science & Engineering: B. Solid-state Materials for Advanced Technology, ISSN 0921-5107, E-ISSN 1873-4944, Vol. 11, p. 250-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this work is to characterize the precipitation kinetics in Haynes® 282® superalloys using in-situ high-energy Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) together with Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (WAXS). The phases identified by WAXS include γ (matrix), γ′ (hardening precipitates), MC (metallic carbides), and M23C6/M6C (secondary metallic carbides). The γ'-precipitates are spheroids with a diameter of several nanometres, depending on the temperature and ageing time. From the SAXS data, quantitative parameters such as volume fraction, number density and inter-particle distance were determined and correlated with ex-situ Vickers microhardness measurements. The strengthening components associated with precipitates and solid solutions are differentiated using the measured Vickers microhardness and SAXS model parameters. A square root dependence between strengthening attributable to the precipitates and the product of volume fraction and mean precipitate radius is found. The solid solution strengthening component correlates with the total volume fraction of precipitates.

  • 38.
    Hanning, Fabian
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Industrial and Materials Science, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Joel
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    The Influence of Base Metal Microstructure on Weld Cracking in Manually GTA Repair Welded Cast ATI 718Plus®2018In: Proceedings of the 9th International Symposium on Superalloy 718 & Derivatives: Energy, Aerospace, and Industrial Applications / [ed] Ott, E., Liu, X., Andersson, J., Bi, Z., Bockenstedt, K., Dempster, I., Groh, J., Heck, K., Jablonski, P., Kaplan, M., Nagahama, D. and Sudbrack, C., 2018, p. 917-928Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of base metal conditions on the weld cracking response of cast ATI 718Plus® was investigated in this study, comparing as cast microstructure with pseudo hot isostatic pressing (HIP) heat treatments at 1120, 1160 and 1190 °C for dwell times of 4 and 24 h. Linear grooves have been filled using multipass manual gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) to simulate repair welding conditions. Metallographic investigation revealed cracks in both base metal heat affected zone and fusion zone layers. The heat treatment temperatures chosen below, at and above incipient laves melting temperature of ATI 718Plus® were found to have an effect on weld cracking behaviour, with an increased average total crack length in the base metal heat affected zone for both 1160 and 1190 °C as compared to the as cast condition and the 1120 °C homogenization treatment. The increase in cracking susceptibility shows a correlation with the amount of Nb-rich secondary phases, with lower amounts leading to crack concentration to solidification grain boundaries present from the casting process, increasing the average crack length.

  • 39.
    Heralic, Almir
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Electrical and Automation Engineering.
    Charles Murgau, Corinne
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Dzevad, Imamovic
    Volvo Aero Coorporation.
    Christiansson, Anna-Karin
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Electrical and Automation Engineering.
    Lennartson, Bengt
    Dep of signal and systems, Chalmers.
    Towards stable high-speed metal-wire deposition, Part I: Parameter studyIn: Journal of laser applications, ISSN 1042-346X, E-ISSN 1938-1387Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Heralic, Almir
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Electrical and Automation Engineering.
    Christiansson, Anna-Karin
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Electrical and Automation Engineering.
    Hurtig, Kjell
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Ottosson, Mattias
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Electrical and Automation Engineering.
    Lennartson, Bengt
    Chalmers.
    Control Design for Automation of Robotized Laser Metal-Wire Deposition2008In: Proceedings of the 17th IFAC World Congress, International Federation of Automatic Control , 2008, p. 14785-14791Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper a novel approach towards automation of robotized laser metal-wire deposition (RLMwD) is described. The RLMwD technique is being developed at University West in cooperation with Swedish industry for solid freeform fabrication of fully dense metal structures. The process utilizes robotized fibre laser welding and metal wire filler material, together with a layered manufacturing method, to create metal structures directly from a CAD drawing. The RLMwD process can also be used for repair or modification of existing components. This paper faces the challenge of designing a control system for maintaining stable process variables, such as a constant layer height and a stable component temperature, during the entire manufacturing process. Several problems are identified and discussed in the paper, e.g. the difficulty of obtaining the bead height in the weld pool environment. The case study is a repair application for stamping tools, where worn out trim edges are to be repaired. Issues regarding the control design, system identification, and the practical implementation of this application are discussed.

  • 41.
    Heralic, Almir
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Electrical and Automation Engineering.
    Ottosson, Mattias
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Electrical and Automation Engineering.
    Hurtig, Kjell
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Kristiansson, Anna-Karin
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Electrical and Automation Engineering.
    Visual feed-back for operator interaction in robotized laser metal deposition2008In: Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Surface Modification Technologies SMT22: Held at University West, Trollhättan, Sweden September 22-24, 2008 / [ed] T.S. Sudarshan & Per Nylen, 2008, p. 297-304Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Hosseini, S.B.
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Johansson, S
    Lektronik, Ing.f:a, 424 49 Angered, Sweden .
    Klement, Uta
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology.
    Kaminski, J
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology.
    Ryttberg, K.
    AB SKF, 415 50 Gothenburg.
    Cutting temperatures during hard turning: Measurements and effects on white layer formation in AISI 521002014In: Journal of Materials Processing Technology, ISSN 0924-0136, E-ISSN 1873-4774, Vol. 214, no 6, p. 1293-1300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper concerns the temperature evolution during white layer formation induced by hard turning of martensitic and bainitic hardened AISI 52100 steel, as well as the effects of cutting temperatures and surface cooling rates on the microstructure and properties of the induced white layers. The cutting temperatures were measured using a high speed two-colour pyrometer, equipped with an optical fibre allowing for temperature measurements at the cutting edge. Depending on the machining conditions, white layers were shown to have formed both above and well below the parent austenitic transformation temperature, Ac1, of about 750 C. Thus at least two different mechanisms, phase transformation above the Ac1 (thermally) and severe plastic deformation below the Ac1 (mechanically), have been active during white layer formation. In the case of the predominantly thermally induced white layers, the cutting temperatures were above 900 C, while for the predominantly mechanically induced white layers the cutting temperatures were approximately 550 C. The surface cooling rates during hard turning were shown to be as high as 104-105 C/s for cutting speeds between 30 and 260 m/min independent of whether the studied microstructure was martensitic or bainitic. Adding the results from the cutting temperature measurements to previous results on the retained austenite contents and residual stresses of the white layers, it can be summarised that thermally induced white layers contain significantly higher amounts of retained austenite compared to the unaffected material and display high tensile residual stresses. On the contrary, in the case of white layers formed mainly due to severe plastic deformation, no retained austenite could be measured and the surface and subsurface residual stresses were compressive. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  • 43.
    Hosseini, Vahid A.
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Aashuri, H.
    Materials Science and Engineering Dep., Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran.
    Kokabi, A. H.
    Materials Science and Engineering Dep., Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran.
    Study of the effect of tool geometry on semisolid stir welding of a AZ91 magnesium alloy2015In: Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Joining Materials, JOM-Institute , 2015, p. 1-10Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Semisolid stir welding is a newly developed method suitable for joining of the magnesium alloy AZ91. In this study, the effect of tool geometries on the joint properties such as bending strength and the occurrence of porosity are studied. A 2 mm-thick Mg-25%Zn interlayer was placed between two AZ91 plates and the plate was heated up to 530°C before joining. At this temperature, when both the interlayer and the base metal were in the semisolid state, a stirrer was introduced into the joint. Drill-tip and round shape stirrer tools were employed at three different stirring rates. Welds produced with the two methods showed similar properties in the shear punch test. However, using the round tool geometry resulted in welds with excellent bending strength closely matching that of the base metal especially at the highest stirring rate. The improved properties when using the round tool was a result of the formation of a very fine and uniform microstructure with a low content of porosity.

  • 44.
    Hosseini, Vahid
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology. Hogskolan Vast.
    Hurtig, Kjell
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Karlsson, Leif
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Effect of multipass TIG welding on the corrosion resistance and microstructure of a super duplex stainless steel2017In: Materials and corrosion - Werkstoffe und Korrosion, ISSN 0947-5117, E-ISSN 1521-4176, Vol. 68, no 4, p. 405-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a study of the effect of repetitive TIG (tungsten inert gas) welding passes, melting and remelting the same material volume on microstructure and corrosion resistance of 2507 (EN 1.4410) super duplex stainless steel. One to four weld passes were autogenously (no filler added) applied on a plate using two different arc energies and with pure argon shielding gas. Sensitization testing showed that multipass remelting resulted in significant loss of corrosion resistance of the weld metal, in base material next to the fusion boundary, and in a zone 1 to 4 mm from the fusion boundary. Metallography revealed the main reasons for sensitization to be a ferrite-rich weld metal and precipitation of nitrides in the weld metal, and adjacent heat affected zone together with sigma phase formation at some distance from the fusion boundary. Corrosion properties cannot be significantly restored by a post weld heat treatment. Using filler metals with higher nickel contents and nitrogen containing shielding gases, are therefore, recommended. Welding with a higher heat input and fewer passes, in some cases, can also decrease the risk of formation of secondary phases and possible corrosion attack.

  • 45.
    Jafari, R.
    et al.
    Department of Material Science and Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran.
    Sadeghimeresht, Esmaeil
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Shahrabi Farahani, T.
    Department of Material Science and Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran .
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Joshi, Shrikant V.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    KCl-induced corrosion behavior of HVAF-sprayed Ni-based coatings in ambient air2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Jafari, Reza
    et al.
    Tarbiat Modares University, Department of Material Science and Engineering, Tehran, Iran.
    Sadeghimeresht, Esmaeil
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Shahrabi Farahani, Taghi
    Tarbiat Modares University, Department of Material Science and Engineering, Tehran, Iran.
    Huhtakangas, Matti
    M. H. Engineering AB, Karlskoga, Sweden .
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Joshi, Shrikant V.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    KCl-Induced High Temperature Corrosion Behavior of HVAF-Sprayed Ni-Based Coatings in Ambient Air2018In: Journal of thermal spray technology (Print), ISSN 1059-9630, E-ISSN 1544-1016, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 500-511Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    KCl-induced high temperature corrosion behavior of four HVAF-sprayed Ni-based coatings (Ni21Cr, Ni5Al, Ni21Cr7Al1Y, and Ni21Cr9Mo) under KCl deposit has been investigated in ambient air at 600°C up to 168h. The coatings were deposited onto 16Mo3 steel - a widely used boiler tube material.Uncoated substrate, 304L and Sanicro25 were used as reference materials in the test environment.SEM/EDS and XRD techniques were utilized to characterize the as-sprayed and exposed samples.The results showed that the small addition of KCl significantly accelerated degradation to the coatings. All coatings provided better corrosion resistance compared to the reference materials. The alumina-forming Ni5Al coating under KCl deposit was capable of forming a more protective oxide scale compared to the chromia-forming coatings as penetration of Cl through diffusion paths was hindered. Both active corrosion and chromate formation mechanisms were found to be responsible for Page 1 of 23ASM the corrosion damages. The corrosion resistance of the coatings based on the microstructure analysis and kinetics had the following ranking (from the best to worst): Ni5Al >Ni21Cr> Ni21Cr7Al1Y>Ni21Cr9Mo.

  • 47.
    Jiang, Janna
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Fasth, Angelica
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Nylen, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Choi, W.B.
    Center for Thermal Spray Research, Stony Brook, NY, USA.
    Microindentation and Inverse Analysis to Characterize Elastic-Plastic Properties for Thermal Sprayed Ti2AlC and NiCoCrAlY2009In: Journal of thermal spray technology (Print), ISSN 1059-9630, E-ISSN 1544-1016, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 194-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elastic-plastic material properties for HVOF sprayed Ti2AlC (sprayed with Maxthal 211 powder) and plasma sprayed NiCoCrAlY coatings were investigated using modeling and experimental Berkovich microindentation. Optical microstructure evaluations were also performed. The theories of Hertz, Oliver and Pharr were combined with finite element analysis for extracting the material properties. Empirically based material models for both thermal sprayed Ti2AlC and NiCoCrAlY coatings are proposed.

  • 48.
    Jiang, Janna
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Numerical modelling of the compression behaviour of single-crystalline MAX-phase materials2010In: Advanced materials research, ISSN 1022-6680, Vol. 89-91, p. 262-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article a numerical model to describe the mechanical behaviour of nanophased singlecrystalline Ti3SiC2 is proposed. The approach is a two dimensional finite element periodic unit cell consisting of an elastic matrix interlayered with shear deformable slip planes which obey the Hill's yield criterion. The periodic unit cell is used to predict compression material behaviour of Ti3SiC2 crystals with arbitrary slip plane orientations. Stress strain relationships are derived for Ti 3SiC2, and the effect of slip plane volume fraction as well as orientation of the slip planes are investigated. The two main deformation mechanisms of the material namely; ordinary slip and so called kinking are considered in the study.

  • 49.
    Jothi, Sathiskumar
    et al.
    Swansea University Bay Campus, College of Engineering, Engineering East Building, Fabian Way, Swansea, United Kingdom.
    Merzlikin, S.V.
    Max-Planck-InstitutfürEisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Strae 1, Düsseldorf, Germany.
    Croft, T.N.
    Swansea University Bay Campus, College of Engineering, Engineering East Building, Fabian Way, Swansea, United Kingdom.
    Andersson, Joel
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mechanical Engineering.
    Brown, S.G.R.
    Swansea University Bay Campus, College of Engineering, Engineering East Building, Fabian Way, Swansea, United Kingdom.
    An investigation of micro-mechanisms in hydrogen induced cracking in nickel-based superalloy 7182016In: Journal of Alloys and Compounds, ISSN 0925-8388, E-ISSN 1873-4669, Vol. 664, p. 664-681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrogen embrittlement of the nickel-iron based superalloy 718 has been investigated using slow strain rate tests for pre-charged material and also in-situ hydrogen charging during testing. Fractography analyses have been carried using scanning electron microscopy, electron back-scattering diffraction and orientation image microscopy concentrating on the influence of microstructural features and associated micro-mechanisms leading to hydrogen induced cracking and embrittlement. It was observed that hydrogen induced transgranular cracking initiates at micro-voids in the crystal lattice. Similar behaviour has been observed in multi-scale finite element chemo-mechanical numerical simulations. In contrast, hydrogen induced localized slip intergranular cracking was associated with the formation of micro-voids in intergranular regions. The effects of grain boundary and triple junction character on intergranular hydrogen embrittlement were also investigated. It was observed that low end high angle misorientations (LHAM), 15°<Ξ ≀ 35°, and critical high angle misorientations (CHAM), 35° < 50°, are preferential sites for hydrogen induced cracking. In contrast, few or no hydrogen induced cracks were observed at low angle misorientations (LAM), 0°≀ Ξ le; 15°, high end high angle misorientations (HHAM), 50°<Ξ ≀ 55°, or special GB misorientations (SGB), Ξ > 55°. Finally, the use of grain boundary engineering techniques to increase the resistance of super alloy 718 to hydrogen induced cracking and embrittlement is discussed. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 50.
    Kanhed, Satish
    et al.
    Biomaterials Processing and Characterization Laboratory Department of Materials Science and Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur Kanpur-208016, Uttar Pradesh, India.
    Awasthi, Shikha
    Biomaterials Processing and Characterization Laboratory Department of Materials Science and Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur Kanpur-208016, Uttar Pradesh, India.
    Midha, Swati
    Department of Textile Technology Indian Institute of Technology Delhi New Delhi, 110016, India.
    Nair, Jitin
    Biomaterials Processing and Characterization Laboratory Department of Materials Science and Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur Kanpur-208016, Uttar Pradesh, India.
    Nisar, Ambreen
    Biomaterials Processing and Characterization Laboratory Department of Materials Science and Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur Kanpur-208016, Uttar Pradesh, India.
    Patel, Anup Kumar
    Biomaterials Processing and Characterization Laboratory Department of Materials Science and Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur Kanpur-208016, Uttar Pradesh, India.
    Pandey, Aditi
    Biomaterials Processing and Characterization Laboratory Department of Materials Science and Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur Kanpur-208016, Uttar Pradesh, India.
    Sharma, Rajeev
    Biomaterials Processing and Characterization Laboratory Department of Materials Science and Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur Kanpur-208016, Uttar Pradesh, India.
    Goel, Sneha
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing. Biomaterials Processing and Characterization Laboratory Department of Materials Science and Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur Kanpur-208016, Uttar Pradesh, India.
    Upadhyaya, Anish
    Powder Metallurgy Laboratory Department of Materials Science and Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur Kanpur-208016, Uttar Pradesh, India.
    Ghosh, Sourabh
    Department of Textile Technology Indian Institute of Technology Delhi New Delhi, 110016, India.
    Balani, Kantesh
    Biomaterials Processing and Characterization Laboratory Department of Materials Science and Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur Kanpur-208016, Uttar Pradesh, India.
    Microporous Hydroxyapatite Ceramic Composites as Tissue Engineering Scaffolds: An Experimental and Computational Study2018In: Advanced Engineering Materials, ISSN 1438-1656, E-ISSN 1527-2648, Vol. 20, no 7, article id 1701062Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bone‐tissue engineering mandates the development of multi‐functional bioactive porous hydroxyapatite (HAp) scaffolds. Herein, microwave sintered HAp/ZnO and HAp/Ag composite scaffolds with ≈5–19% porosity are developed using 0–30 vol% graphite as a porogen. The mechanical properties of the porous scaffold are analyzed in detail, revealing that even being more porous, the reinforcement of ZnO (9% porosity, hardness of 2.8 GPa, and toughness of 3.5 MPa.m1/2) has shown to have better hardness and fracture toughness when compared to Ag (5% porosity, hardness of 1.6 GPa, and toughness of 2.6 MPa.m1/2). The flexural strength obtained experimentally are complemented with a finite‐element technique that adopts microstructural features in visualizing the effect of porosity on stress distribution. The antibacterial efficacy and cytocompatibility of these composites are validated by increased metabolic activity and conspicuous cell‐matrix interactions. The anticipation of the results reveal that HAp/ZnO (9% porosity) and HAp/Ag (5% porosity) composites can be used as a potential multi‐functional bone implant scaffolds.

12 1 - 50 of 85
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf