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  • 1.
    Abou Nada, Fahed
    et al.
    Lund University, Department of Physics, Division of Combustion Physics, Box 118, Lund, Swede.
    Lantz, Andreas
    Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery AB, Finspång, Sweden.
    Larfeldt, Jenny
    Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery AB, Finspång, Sweden.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Alden, Marcus
    Lund University, Department of Physics, Division of Combustion Physics, Box 118, Lund, Swede.
    Richter, Mattias
    Lund University, Department of Physics, Division of Combustion Physics, Box 118, Lund, Swede.
    Remote temperature sensing on and beneath atmospheric plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings using thermographic phosphors2016In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 302, p. 359-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Investigations on remote temperature sensing of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) at the surface and at the bond-coat/top-coat interface were carried out. Using Y2O3:Eu thermographic phosphor as an embedded temperature sensing layer, sub-surface temperature probing through 300 mu m of atmospheric plasma sprayed YSZ is demonstrated. The Y2O3:Eu thermographic phosphor displays a temperature sensitivity ranging between 400 degrees C up to a maximum of 900 degrees C when utilizing the luminescence originating from the 611 nm emission band. Dysprosium stabilized zirconia (10 wt.% DySZ), a TBC material, is also investigated and established as a temperature sensor from 400 degrees C up to a temperature of 1000 degrees C using both the intensity decay time and emission intensity ratio methods. In addition, the luminescence of presumed optically inactive YSZ materials was spectroscopically investigated in terms of optical interferences caused by impurities. A validation temperature probing measurement through 300 mu m of YSZ top-coat was successfully performed in a SGT-800 Siemens burner running at six different operating conditions in an atmospheric combustion rig. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Adli, E.
    et al.
    University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Gjersdal, H.
    University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Røhne, O.M.
    University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Dorholt, O.
    University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Bang, D.M.
    University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Thomas, D,
    ESS ERIC, Lund, Sweden.
    Shea, T.
    ESS ERIC, Lund, Sweden.
    Andersson, R.
    ESS ERIC, Lund, Sweden.
    Ibison, M.G.
    University of Liverpool and Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury, UK.
    Welsch, C.P
    University of Liverpool and Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury, UK.
    Joshi, Shrikant V.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    The Ess Target Proton Beam Imaging Systemas In-Kind Contribution2017In: Proceedings of IPAC2017, Copenhagen, Denmark, 2017, p. 3422-3425Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Agic, Adnan
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Analysis of entry phase in intermittent machining2018Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cutting forces and vibrations are essential parameters in the assessment of a cutting process. As the energy consumption in the machining process is directly affected by the magnitude of the cutting forces it is of vital importance to design cutting edges and select process conditions that will maintain high tool performance through reduced energy consumption. The vibrations are often the cause of poor results in terms of accuracy, low reliability due to sudden failures and bad environmental conditions caused by noise. The goal of this work is to find out how the cutting edge and cutting conditions affect the entry conditions of the machining operation. This is done utilizing experimental methods and appropriate theoretical approaches applied to the cutting forces and vibrations. The research was carried out through three main studies beginning with a force build-up analysis of the cutting edge entry into the workpiece in intermittent turning. This was followed by a second study, concentrated on modelling of the entry phase which has been explored through experiments and theory developed in the first study. The third part was focused on the influence of the radial depth of cut upon the entry of cutting edge into the workpiece in a face milling application. The methodology for the identification of unfavourable cutting conditions is also explained herein. Important insights into the force build-up process help addressing the correlation between the cutting geometries and the rise time of the cutting force. The influence of the nose radius for a given cutting tool and workpiece configuration during the initial entry is revealed. The critical angle i.e. the position of the face milling cutter that results in unfavourable entry conditions has been explained emphasizing the importance of the selection of cutting conditions. Finally, the theoretical methods utilized for the evaluation of the role of cutting edge geometry within entry phase dynamics has been explored. This has revealed the trends that are of interest for selection of cutting conditions and cutting edge design.

  • 4.
    Agic, Adnan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing. Seco Tools, Fagersta, Sweden.
    Eynian, Mahdi
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Hägglund, S.
    Seco Tools, Fagersta, Sweden.
    Ståhl, Jan-Eric
    Lund University, Production and Materials Engineering, Lund, Sweden.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Influence of radial depth of cut on dynamics of face milling application2016In: The 7th International Swedish Production Symposium, SPS16, Conference Proceedings: 25th – 27th of October 2016, Lund: Swedish Production Academy , 2016, p. 1-9Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The choice of milling cutter geometry and appropriate cutting data for certain milling application is of vital importance for successful machining results. Unfavourable selection of cutting conditions might give rise to high load impacts that cause severe cutting edge damage. The radial depth of cut in combination with milling cutter geometry might under some circumstances give unfavourable entry conditions in terms of cutting forces and vibration amplitudes. This phenomenon originates from the geometrical features that affect the rise time of the cutting edge engagement into work piece at different radial depths of cut. As the radial depth of cut is often an important parameter, particularly when machining difficult to cut materials, it is important to explore the driving mechanism behind vibrations generation. In this study, acceleration of the work piece is measured for different radial depths of cut and cutting edge geometries. The influence of the radial depth of cut on the dynamical behaviour is evaluated in time and frequency domains. The results for different radial depths of cut and cutting geometries are quantified using root mean square value of acceleration. The outcome of this research study can be used both for the better cutting data recommendations and improved tool design.

  • 5.
    Agic, Adnan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Eynian, Mahdi
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Hägglund, S.
    Seco Tools, Fagersta, Sweden.
    Ståhl, J-E
    Lund University ,Production and Materials Engineering, Lund Sweden.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Influence of radial depth of cut on entry conditions and dynamics in face milling application2017In: Journal of Superhard Materials, ISSN 1063-4576, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 259-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The choice of milling cutter geometry and appropriate cutting data for certain milling application is of vital importance for successful machining results. Unfavorable selection of cutting conditions might give rise to high load impacts that cause severe cutting edge damage. Under some circumstances the radial depth of cut in combination with milling cutter geometry might give unfavorable entry conditions in terms of cutting forces and vibration amplitudes. This phenomenon is originated from the geometrical features that affect the rise time of the cutting edge engagement into workpiece at different radial depths of cut. As the radial depth of cut is often an important parameter, particularly when machining difficult-to-cut materials, it is important to explore the driving mechanism behind vibrations generation. In this study, acceleration of the workpiece is measured for different radial depths of cut and cutting edge geometries. The influence of the radial depth of cut on the dynamical behavior is evaluated in time and frequency domains. The results for different radial depths of cut and cutting geometries are quantified using the root mean square value of acceleration. The outcome of this research study can be used both for the better cutting data recommendations and improved tool design.

  • 6.
    Anderberg, Staffan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Pejryd, Lars
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Energy and Cost Efficiency in CNC Machining from a Process Planning Perspective2011In: 9th Global Conference on Sustainable Manufacturing: Sustainable Manufacturing –Shaping Global Value Creation / [ed] Günther Seliger, 2011, p. 383-389Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of process planning as an enabler for cost efficient and environmentally benign CNC machining is investigated in the paper. Specific energy is used as the principal indicator of energy efficient machining and different methods to calculate and estimate this is exemplified and discussed. The interrelation between process planning decisions and production outcome is sketched and process capability can be considered as one factor of green machining. A correlation between total machining cost and total energy use was shown for an experimental case. However, to generalise conclusions, the importance of having reliable data during process planning to make effective decisions should not be underestimated.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Joel
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Review of Weldability of Precipitation Hardening Ni- and Fe-Ni-Based Superalloys2018In: Proceedings of the 9th International Symposium on Superalloy 718 & Derivatives: Energy, Aerospace, and Industrial Applications, Springer, 2018, p. 899-916Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fabrication and welding of structural components for the hot section of aero-engines continues to be of high importance to the manufacturing industry of aero-engines. This paper discusses and reviews the literature on hot cracking and strain age cracking, cracking phenomena that can occur during welding or subsequent heat treatment of precipitation hardened Ni- and Fe-Ni-based superalloys. The influence of chemical composition in terms of i.e. hardening elements and impurities, microstructure of base material and weld zone, together with welding processes and corresponding parameters and heat input are discussed and related to the cracking susceptibility of different nickel based superalloys.

  • 8.
    Andersson, Joel
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Jacobsson, J.
    Brederholm, A.
    Hänninen, H.
    Improved understanding of Varestraint Testing: Nickel-based superalloys2016In: Cracking Phenomena in Welds IV / [ed] Boellinghaus, T., Lippold, J. C. and Cross, C. E., Springer Publishing Company, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information about the book:

    This is the fourth volume in the well-established series of compendiums devoted to the subject of weld hot cracking. It contains the papers presented at the 4th International Cracking Workshop held in Berlin in April 2014. In the context of this workshop, the term “cracking” refers to hot cracking in the classical and previous sense, but also to cold cracking, stress-corrosion cracking and elevated temp. solid-state cracking.  A variety of different cracking subjects are discussed, including test standards, crack prediction, weldability determination, crack mitigation, stress states, numerical modelling, and cracking mechanisms.  Likewise, many different alloys were investigated such as aluminum alloys, copper-aluminum dissimilar metal, austenitic stainless steel, nickel base alloys, duplex stainless steel, creep resistant steel, and high strength steel.

  • 9.
    Andersson, Joel
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Jacobsson, J.
    Lundin, C.
    A Historical perspective on Varestraint testing and the importance of testing parameters2016In: Cracking Phenomena in Welds IV / [ed] Boellinghaus, T., Lippold, J. C. and Cross, C. E., Springer Publishing Company, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Andersson, Joel
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes. Department of Materials Technology, Volvo Aero Corporation, Trollha¨ttan, Sweden and Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, G.
    Department of Materials Technology, Volvo Aero Corporation, Trollha¨ttan, Sweden and Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Repair welding of wrought superalloys: Alloy 718, Allvac 718Plus and Waspaloy2012In: Science and Technology of Welding and Joining, ISSN 1362-1718, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 49-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to weld repair three precipitation hardening superalloys, i.e. Alloy 718, Allvac 718Plus and Waspaloy, with gas tungsten arc welding, is compared in this study. Four different solution heat treatment conditions for each material were examined: Alloy 718 and Allvac 718Plus heat treated at 954uC–1 h, 982uC–1 h, 954uC–15 h and 1020uC–1 h and Waspaloy for 4 h at 996uC, 1010uC, 1040uC and at 1080uC. By metallography, the total number of cracks was evaluated in both the heat affected zone and the fusion zone, which made it possible to consistently rate the repair weldability of these three materials. Alloy 718 was significantly the best one, with Allvac 718Plus slightly better than Waspaloy. As expected, the solution heat treatment conditions only affected the heat affected zone cracking behaviour.

  • 11.
    Andersson, Joel
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Sjöberg, G.
    Brederholm, A.
    Hänninen, H.
    Solidification Cracking of Alloy Allvac 718Plus and Alloy 718 at Transvarestraint Testing2010In: EPD Congress 2008: Proceedings of Sessions and Symposia Sponsored by the Extraction and Processing Division (EPD) / [ed] Stanley M. Howard, Wiley-Blackwell, 2010, p. 157-169Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Andersson, Joel
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Sjöberg, G.
    Chaturvedi, M.
    Hot Ductility Study of Haynes 282 Superalloy2010In: Superalloy 718 and Derivatives: Proceedings of the 7th International Symposium on Superalloy 718 and Derivatives / [ed] E. A. Ott, J. R. Groh, A. Banik, I. Dempster, T. P. Gabb, R. Helmink, X. Liu, A. Mitchell, G. P. Sjöberg and A. Wusatowska-Sarnek, The Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society, 2010, p. 539-554Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Andersson, Joel
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Sjöberg, G.
    Hatami, S.
    Notch Sensitivity and Intergranular Crack Growth in the Allvac 718Plus Superalloy2007In: XVIII International Symposium on Air Breathing Engines (ISABE): Beijing, China, 2-7 September 2007, 2007, p. n.1293-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Andersson, Joel
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes. Volvo Aero Corporation, Trollhättan, Sweden och Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, G.
    Volvo Aero Corporation, Trollhättan, Sweden och Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hänninen, H.
    Aalto University School of Science and Technology, Espoo, Finland.
    Metallurgical Response of Electron Beam Welded Allvac® 718Plus™2011In: Hot Cracking Phenomena in Welds III / [ed] Lippold, J., Böllinghaus, T. and Cross C. E., Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011, p. 415-428Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electron beam welding of forged Allvac 718Plus superalloy has been carried out without any visible cracks in weld cross-sections. Healed cracks in the heat affected zone were, however, seen in most cross-sections with the healing as well as the cracking believed to be due to the constitutional liquation of the δ-phase. The δ-phase undergoes constitutional liquation in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and consequently decreases the ductility of the material and renders cracks in the HAZ but due to the large amount of eutectic liquid produced at the same time the healing of the opened cracks takes place.

  • 15.
    Andersson, Joel
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes. Volvo Aero Corporation, Materials Technology Department, Trollhättan, Sweden och Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Göteborg,Sweden.
    Sjöberg, G.
    Volvo Aero Corporation, Materials Technology Department, Trollhättan, Sweden och Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Larsson, J.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Göteborg,Sweden.
    Investigation of Homogenization and its Influence on the Repair Welding of Cast Allvac 718Plus(®)2010In: Superalloy 718 and Derivatives: Proceedings of the 7th International Symposium on Superalloy 718 and Derivatives / [ed] E. A. Ott, J. R. Groh, A. Banik, I. Dempster, T. P. Gabb, R. Helmink, X. Liu, A. Mitchell, G. P. Sjöberg, and A. Wusatowska-Sarnek, The Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society, 2010, p. 439-454Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Andersson, Joel
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes. Department of Materials Technology, GKN Aerospace Engine Systems, Trollhättan, Sweden och Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, G.
    Department of Materials Technology, GKN Aerospace Engine Systems, Trollhättan, Sweden och Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Viskari, L.
    Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Chaturvedi, M. C.
    Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
    Effect of Different Solution Heat Treatments on the Hot Ductility of Superalloys: Part 3 - Waspaloy2013In: Materials Science and Technology, ISSN 0267-0836, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 43-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The susceptibility to heat affected zone cracking of Waspaloy has been investigated in terms of its hot ductility, measured as the reduction of area (RA). Gleeble testing with on-heating as well as on-cooling test cycles was carried out to illuminate the influence of different 4 h solution heat treatments between 996 and 1080°C. A ductility maximum of between 80 and 90%RA was found at 1050–1100°C for all conditions in the on-heating tests. Although the different heat treatment conditions showed similar macrohardness, the particle size and distribution of the γ′ and M23C6 phases differed, which significantly affected the on-heating ductility in the lower temperature test region. The ductile to brittle transition was initiated at 1100°C in the on-heating testing with indications of grain boundary liquation at the higher test temperatures. Ductility recovery, as measured in the on-cooling tests from 1240°C, was very limited with <30%RA for all conditions and test temperatures except for the 1080°C/4 h treatment, which exhibited 60%RA at 980°C.

  • 17.
    Andersson, Joel
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes. Department of Materials Technology, Volvo Aero Corporation, Trollhättan, Sweden and Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, G.
    Department of Materials Technology, Volvo Aero Corporation, Trollhättan, Sweden and Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Viskari, L.
    Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Chaturvedi, M.C.
    Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
    Effect of different solution heat treatments on hot ductility of superalloys: Part 2 – Allvac 718Plus2012In: Materials Science and Technology, ISSN 0267-0836, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 733-741Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hot ductility of Allvac 718Plus for different solution heat treatments (954°C–15 h, 954°C–1 h, 982°C–1 h and 1050°C–3 h+954°C–1 h) has been investigated using Gleeble testing. Substantial variations in the microstructure among the heat treatments affected the Gleeble test hot ductility only to a very limited extent. Constitutional liquation of the NbC phase was found to be the main cause for the poor ductility at high testing temperatures in the on-heating cycle as well as at the lower temperatures on-cooling. Grain boundary δ phase was seen to assist the constitutional liquation of the NbC phase. Based on established evaluation criteria for Gleeble ductility testing, a ranked indicator for weldability is suggested.

  • 18.
    Andersson, Joel
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes. Department of Materials Technology at Volvo Aero Corporation, Trollhättan, and Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, G.
    Department of Materials Technology at Volvo Aero Corporation, Trollhättan, and Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Viskari, L.
    Department of Microscopy and Microanalysis at Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Chaturvedi, M.C.
    Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 5V6 Canada.
    Effect of solution heat treatments on superalloys: Part 1 – alloy 7182012In: Materials Science and Technology, ISSN 0267-0836, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 609-619Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hot ductility as measured by Gleeble testing of Alloy 718 at four different solution heat treatments (954°C/15 h, 954°C/1 h, 982°C/1 h and 1050°C/3 h+954°C/1 h) has been investigated. It is concluded that constitutional liquation of NbC assisted by δ phase takes place and deteriorates the ductility. Parameters established by analysing the ductility dependence on temperature indicate a reduced weldability of the material in the coarse grain size state (ASTM 3) while indicating an increased weldability when containing a large amount of δ phase due to a grain boundary pinning effect. The accumulation of trace elements during grain growth at the highest temperature is believed to be the cause for the observed reduced on-cooling ductility.

  • 19.
    Andersson, Oscar
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Production Engineering and XPRES, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fahlström, Karl
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Melander, Arne
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Production Engineering and XPRES, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Experiments and efficient simulations of distortions of laser beam–welded thin-sheet close beam steel structures2018In: Proceedings of the Institution of mechanical engineers. Part B, journal of engineering manufacture, ISSN 0954-4054, E-ISSN 2041-2975Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, geometrical distortions of steel structures due to laser beam welding were analyzed. Two 700-mm-long U-beam structures were welded in overlap configurations: a double U-beam structure and a U-beam/flat structure. The structures were in different material combinations from mild steel to ultrahigh-strength steel welded with different process parameters. Different measures of distortions of the U-beam structures were evaluated after cooling. Significant factors of the welding process and the geometry of the structures were identified. Furthermore, welding distortions were modeled using two predictive finite element simulation models. The previously known shrinkage method and a newly developed time-efficient simulation method were evaluated. The new model describes the effects of expansion and shrinkage of the weld zone during welding and material plasticity at elevated temperatures. The new simulation method has reasonable computation times for industrial applications and improved agreement with experiments compared to the often used so-called shrinkage method. © 2018, IMechE 2018.

  • 20.
    Aranke, Omkar
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Effect of spray parameters on micro-structure and lifetime of suspension plasma sprayed thermal barrier coat-ings2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Fabrication of Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs) with higher lifetime and relatively cheaper processes is of particular interest for gas turbine applications. Suspension Plasma Spray (SPS) is capable of producing coatings with porous columnar structure, and it is also a much cheaper process compared to the conventionally used Electron Beam Physical Vapour Dep-osition (EB-PVD). Although TBCs fabricated using SPS have lower thermal conductivity as compared to other commonly used processes, they are still not commercialized due to their poor lifetime expectancy.

    Lifetime of TBCs is highly influenced by the top coat microstructure. The objective of this work was to study and evaluate the top coat microstructure produced using axial SPS with different process parameters. 8 wt. % Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) suspension with 25 % solid load in ethanol was used to spray the top coat. The bond coat was deposited on Has-telloy-X substrates using a NiCoCrAlY powder by High Velocity Air Fuel (HVAF) spray with same process parameters. Influence of the microstructure on lifetime of the coatings was of particular interest in this work. The coating microstructure was analysed using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and it was observed that axial SPS is capable of producing TBCs with varied top coat microstructure from highly porous to densely packed columnar microstructure. The lifetime of the coatings was determined by Thermal Cyclic Fatigue (TCF) testing and Burner Rig Testing (BRT). Porosity and Thermal conductivity of the coat-ings was determined by Image Analysis and Laser Flash Analysis (LFA) respectively.

    From the results obtained, it can be concluded that axial SPS could be a promising method of producing TBCs with low thermal conductivity & high lifetime for high temperature gas turbine applications.

  • 21.
    Aranke, Omkar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Gupta, Mohit Kumar
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Li, Xin-Hai
    Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery AB, Finspång, Sweden.
    Kjellman, Björn
    GKN Aerospace Sweden AB, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Microstructural Evolution and Sintering of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Columnar Thermal Barrier Coatings2018In: Journal of thermal spray technology (Print), ISSN 1059-9630, E-ISSN 1544-1016Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Suspension plasma spray (SPS) is capable of producing coatings with porous columnar structure, and it is also a much cheaper process compared to the conventionally used electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD). Although TBCs with a columnar microstructure that are fabricated using SPS have typically lower thermal conductivity than EB-PVD, they are used sparingly in the aerospace industry due to their lower fracture toughness and limited lifetime expectancy. Lifetime of TBCs is highly influenced by the topcoat microstructure. The objective of this work was to study the TBCs produced using axial SPS with different process parameters. Influence of the microstructure on lifetime of the coatings was of particular interest, and it was determined by thermal cyclic fatigue testing. The effect of sintering on microstructure of the coatings exposed to high temperatures was also investigated. Porosity measurements were taken using image analysis technique, and thermal conductivity of the coatings was determined by laser flash analysis. The results show that axial SPS is a promising method of producing TBCs having various microstructures with good lifetime. Changes in microstructure of topcoat due to sintering were seen evidently in porous coatings, whereas dense topcoats showed good resistance against sintering.

  • 22.
    Asala, G.
    et al.
    University of Manitoba, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Winnipeg, R3T 5V6, Canada.
    Andersson, Joel
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Ojo, Olanrewaj A.
    University of Manitoba, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Winnipeg, R3T 5V6, Canada.
    Improved dynamic impact behaviour of wire-arc additive manufactured ATI 718Plus®2018In: Materials Science & Engineering: A, ISSN 0921-5093, E-ISSN 1873-4936, Vol. 738, p. 111-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dynamic response and impact resistance of wire-arc additive manufactured (AMed) and wrought ATI 718Plus in different heat treatment conditions are characterised by using a direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar system. In addition, microstructural analyses of the alloys, before and after impact, are characterised by using advanced microscopy techniques, including scanning electron and transmission electron microscopies. The experimental results show that the impact resistance of the AMed alloy in the as-processed condition is inferior to that of the wrought alloy. The lower impact resistance is attributed to the presence of eutectic solidification constituents in the interdendritic regions and to the inhomogeneous distribution of the strengthening precipitates in the deposit. After the application of the recommended heat treatment for ATI 718Plus, excessive formation of η-phase particles are observed in the microstructure in addition to Laves phase particles. Since the recommended heat treatment for ATI 718Plus is not sufficient to eliminate the deleterious phases and optimise the properties of the alloy, a novel heat treatment procedure is proposed. Dynamic impact study of the AMed alloy after the application of the proposed approach shows that the alloy exhibits a dynamic response and impact resistance comparable to those of the wrought alloy. Furthermore, under high impact momentum, both the wrought and the AMed alloys fail due to the adiabatic shear band. A transmission electron microscopy analysis of the deformed alloys suggests the dissolution of the γ’ precipitates in the shear band as well as in the adjacent regions to the shear band. Increase in the rate of dissolution of the precipitates due to strain-assisted diffusion coupled with an increase in the adiabatic temperature during deformation, are likely causes of the dissolution of the precipitates in the shear band regions. © 2018 Elsevier B.V.

  • 23.
    Asala, G.
    et al.
    University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, R3T 5V6, Canada .
    Andersson, Joel
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mechanical Engineering.
    Ojo, Olanrewaj A.
    University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, R3T 5V6, Canada .
    Precipitation behavior of gamma′ precipitates in the fusion zone of TIG welded ATI 718Plus®2016In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015, Vol. 87, no 9-12, p. 2721-2729Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The precipitation behavior of the main strengthening phase, γ′ precipitates, in ATI 718Plus® superalloy after Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding and postweld heat treatments has been studied. In contrast to electron beam welding, where no γ′ precipitates are reported to form in the as-welded condition, analytical transmission electron microscopy study in this work revealed the formation of γ′ precipitates after the TIG welding, albeit in a non-uniform distribution manner. This is attributable to a more extensive elemental microsegregation that occurred into the interdendritic liquid and slower cooling rate during the TIG welding, which also induced the formation of interdendritic Nb-rich Laves phase particles and MC-type carbides. Theoretical calculations were performed to study the influence of Nb microsegregation, on both the kinetics and extent of γ′ precipitation, and the results agree with experimental observations. It is found that the precipitation kinetics, and not the extent of γ′ precipitate formation in the fusion zone, during postweld heat treatments is affected by the micro-segregation of Nb that produced Laves phase particles during the weld solidification.

  • 24.
    Asala, G.
    et al.
    University of Manitoba, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Andersson, Joel
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Ojo, Olanrewaju
    University of Manitoba, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Microstructure Dependence of Dynamic Impact Behaviour of ATI 718plus® Superalloy2018In: Proceedings of the 9th International Symposium on Superalloy 718 & Derivatives: Energy, Aerospace, and Industrial Applications, Springer, 2018, p. 369-378Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ATI 718Plus® is a γ′-strengthened nickel-based superalloy developed to substitute the widely used Alloy 718 in aero-engine applications. This newer superalloy is a candidate material for aero-engine turbine structures, with the requirement to withstand impact loading occurring at high strain rates during turbine blade out events. Furthermore, the understanding of the high strain rate response of ATI 718Plus® is important in optimising its machinability during cutting operations. To predict and model the behaviour of ATI 718Plus® during these events and in other dynamic impact applications, proper understanding of the high strain rate behaviour of the alloy is important, but not presently available. Therefore, in this work, the influence of microstructural condition and strain rates on dynamic impact behaviour of ATI 718Plus®, using a modified version of direct impact Hopkinson bar, is investigated. It is observed that the age-hardened alloy exhibits a significantly reduced strain hardening and strain rate hardening capabilities compared to the solution heat treated microstructure. Furthermore, microstructural examination of the deformed samples shows that the formation of adiabatic shear bands, which usually serve as damage nucleation site, is substantially suppressed in the solution heat treated microstructure, while the aged microstructure exhibits high propensity to form localised shear bands.

  • 25.
    Asala, G.
    et al.
    University of Manitoba, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Khan, A. K.
    University of Manitoba, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Andersson, Joel
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mechanical Engineering. University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Ojo, O. A.
    University of Manitoba, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Microstructural Analyses of ATI 718Plus® Produced by Wire-ARC Additive Manufacturing Process2017In: Metallurgical and Materials Transactions. A, ISSN 1073-5623, E-ISSN 1543-1940, Vol. 48A, no 9, p. 4211-4228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A detailed microstructural study of ATI 718Plus superalloy produced by the wire-arc additive manufacturing (WAAM) process was performed through the use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Extensive formation of eutectic solidification microconstituents including Laves and MC-type carbide phases, induced by micro-segregation, are observed in the build of the alloy in the as-deposited condition. Notwithstanding the significant segregation of niobium (Nb), which has been reported to promote the formation of the delta-phase in ATI 718Plus, only eta-phase particles are observed in the deposit. Excessive precipitation of eta-phase particles is found to be linked to Laves phase particles that are partially dissolved in the deposit after post-deposition heat treatment (PDHT). The EBSD analysis shows a high textured build in the aOE (c) 100 > directions with only a few misoriented grains at the substrate-deposit boundary and the top of the deposit. Investigation on the hardness of the build of the alloy, in the as-deposited condition, showed a softened zone about 2 mm wide at the deposited metal heat affected zone (DMHAZ), which has not been previously reported and potentially damaging to the mechanical properties. An extensive analysis with the use of both microstructural characterization tools and theoretical calculations shows that the DMHAZ has the lowest volume fraction of strengthening precipitates (gamma’ and gamma aEuro(3)) in terms of their number density, which therefore induces the observed softness. Delayed re-precipitation kinetics and the extent of the precipitation of gamma’ and gamma aEuro(3) in the DMHAZ which is related to the diffusion of segregated solute elements from the interdendritic regions are attributed to this phenomenon. The microstructural analyses discussed in this work are vital to adequate understanding of properties of ATI 718Plus produced by the additive manufacturing process technique.

  • 26.
    Asala, Gbenga
    et al.
    University of Manitoba, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Andersson, Joel
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Ojo, O. A.
    University of Manitoba, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Winnipeg, Canada.
    A study of the dynamic impact behaviour of IN 718 and ATI 718Plus® superalloys2018In: Philosophical Magazine, ISSN 1478-6435, E-ISSN 1478-6443Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dynamic impact response of IN 718 and ATI 718Plus®, in both the solution heat treated and age-hardened conditions, were investigated at different deformation temperatures and strain rates using a direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar. Analyses of the results provide a vital but previously not reported information that the ATI 718Plus® offers a higher resistance to damage during high strain rate ballistic impact deformation compared to the most widely used Iron-nickel based superalloy, Inconel 718. ATI 718Plus® showed higher strain hardening and strain rate sensitivity, in both heat treatment conditions, than IN 718. The difference in the deformation behaviour of both alloys, in the annealed condition, is attributable to the compositional modification in ATI 718Plus® which has been reported to lower its stacking fault energy and increases the tendency for deformation twinning. However, in the age-hardened condition, the difference is believed to be related to the disparity in the operative strengthening mechanism, of the precipitates present in both alloys. Furthermore, a higher susceptibility to strain location and the formation of adiabatic shear band, in aged IN 718, is attributable to the stronger temperature-softening characteristics observed in the alloy and to the limited strain hardening tendency under dynamic impact loading. © 2018, © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 27.
    Awasthi, Shikha
    et al.
    Material Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, Kanpur, India .
    Goel, Sneha
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Pandey, Chandra Prabha
    Babu Banarasi Das University, Department of Chemistry, Lucknow, India.
    Balani, Kantesh
    Material Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, Kanpur, India .
    Multi-Length Scale Tribology of Electrophoretically Deposited Nickel-Diamond Coatings2017In: JOM: The Member Journal of TMS, ISSN 1047-4838, E-ISSN 1543-1851, Vol. 69, no 2, p. 227-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrophoretically deposited (EPD) nickel and its composite coatings are widely used to enhance the life span of continuous ingot casting molds in the steel, aerospace and automotive industries. This article reports the effect of different concentrations of diamond particles (2.5–10 g/L) on the wear mechanism of EPD Ni. The distribution of diamond particles in the Ni matrix was observed using Voronoi tessellation. Variation in COF was observed by a fretting wear test to be 0.51 ± 0.07 for Ni, which decreases to 0.35 ± 0.03 for the Ni-diamond coatings. The wear volume of the coatings with 7.5 g/L concentration of diamond was observed to be a minimum (0.051 ± 0.02 × 10−3 mm3) compared with other composite coatings. Further, the micro-scratch testing of the coatings also exhibited a reduced COF (0.03–0.12) for 7.5 g/L diamond concentration compared with Ni (0.08–0.13). Higher wear resistance of the diamond-added coatings (optimum 7.5 g/L concentration) is due to the balance between the dispersion strengthening mechanism and the enhancement of the load-bearing capacity due to the incorporation of diamond particles. Thus, these composites can be used for applications in automotive and aerospace industries. © 2016 The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society

  • 28.
    Babu, Bijish
    et al.
    Mechanics of Sold Materials, Luleå University of Technology, SE-971 87, Luleå, Sweden.
    Charles Murgau, Corinne
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Avdelningen för svetsteknologi (SV).
    Lindgren, Lars-Erik
    Mechanics of Sold Materials, Luleå University of Technology, SE-971 87, Luleå, Sweden.
    Physically Based Constitutive Model of Ti-6Al-4V for Arbitrary Phase CompositionArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The main challenge in producing aerospace components using Ti-6Al-4V alloy is to employ the optimum process window of deformation rate and temperature in order to achieve desired material properties. Understanding the microstructure property relationship qualitatively is not enough to achieve this goal. Developing advanced material models to be used in manufacturing process simulation is the key to iteratively computeand optimize the process. The focus in this work is on physically based flow stress models coupled with microstructure evolution models. Such a model can be used to simulate processes involving complex and cyclic thermo-mechanical loading

  • 29.
    Bahbou, M. Fouzi
    et al.
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Mechanical Engineering.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Division for Mechanical Engineering.
    On-Line Measurement of Plasma-Sprayed Ni-Particles during Impact on a Ti-Surface: influence of Surface Oxidation2007In: Journal of thermal spray technology (Print), ISSN 1059-9630, E-ISSN 1544-1016, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 506-511Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to analyze the impact of plasma-sprayed Ni5%Al particles on polished and grit-blasted Ti6Al4V samples under oxidized and nonoxidized conditions. For this purpose, measurements of thermal radiation and velocity of individual plasma-sprayed particles were carried out. From the thermal radiation at impact, splat diameter during flattening and temperature evolution during cooling were evaluated. Characteristic parameters related to the quality of contact between the splat and the substrate were retrieved. The flattening speed was introduced to characterize wetting, while the cooling rate was used to characterize solidification. The idea was to get a signature of particle impact for a given surface roughness and oxidation state by identifying parameters which strongly affect the splat behavior. Sieved Ni5%Al powder in a narrow range (+65 −75 μm) was sprayed on four sets of titanium alloy surfaces, consisting of polished and grit-blasted samples, one set had a nonoxidized surface and the other one was oxidized in an oven at 600 °C for two hours. Resulting splats after impact were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, the splats on oxidized surface showed pores in their core and detached fingers at the periphery. The cooling rate and flattening degree significantly increased on the oxidized smooth surface compared to the nonoxidized one. This trend was not found in grit-blasted surfaces, which implies that impact phenomena are different on grit-blasted surfaces than on smooth surfaces thus further work is needed.

  • 30.
    Balachandramurthi Ramanathan, Arun
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Fatigue Properties of Additively Manufactured Alloy 7182018Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Additive Manufacturing (AM), commonly known as 3D Printing, is a disruptive modern manufacturing process, in which parts are manufactured in a layer-wise fashion. Among the metal AM processes, Powder Bed Fusion (PBF) technology has opened up a design space that was not formerly accessible with conventional manufacturing processes. It is, now, possible to manufacture complex geometries, such as topology-optimized structures, lattice structures and intricate internal channels, with relative ease. PBF is comprised of Electron Beam Melting (EBM) and Selective Laser Melting (SLM) processes.

    Though AM processes offer several advantages, the suitability of these processes to replace conventional manufacturing processes must be studied in detail; for instance, the capability to produce components of consistent quality. Therefore, understanding the relationship between the AM process together with the post treatment used and the resulting microstructure and its influence on the mechanical properties is crucial, to enable manufacturing of high-performance components. In this regard, for AM built Alloy 718, only a limited amount of work has been performed compared to conventional processes such as casting and forging. The aim of this work, therefore, is to understand how the fatigue properties of EBM and SLM built Alloy 718, subjected to different thermal post-treatments, is affected by the microstructure. In addition, the effect of as-built surface roughness is also studied.

    Defects can have a detrimental effect on fatigue life. Numerous factors such as the defect type, size, shape, location, distribution and nature determine the effect of defects on properties. Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) improves fatigue life as it leads to closure of most defects. Presence of oxides in the defects, however, hinders complete closure by HIP. Machining the as-built surface improves fatiguelife; however, for EBM manufactured material, the extent of improvement is dependent on the amount of material removed. The as-built surface roughness, which has numerous crack initiation sites, leads to lower scatter in fatigue life. In both SLM and EBM manufactured material, fatigue crack propagation is transgranular. Crack propagation is affected by grain size and texture of the material.

  • 31.
    Balachandramurthi Ramanathan, Arun
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Johansson Moverare, Johan
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping, Sweden.
    Dixit, Nikhil
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Pederson, Robert
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Influence of defects and as-built surface roughness on fatigue properties of additively manufactured Alloy 7182018In: Materials Science & Engineering: A, ISSN 0921-5093, E-ISSN 1873-4936, Vol. 735, p. 463-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electron beam melting (EBM) and Selective Laser Melting (SLM) are powder bed based additive manufacturing (AM) processes. These, relatively new, processes offer advantages such as near net shaping, manufacturing complex geometries with a design space that was previously not accessible with conventional manufacturing processes, part consolidation to reduce number of assemblies, shorter time to market etc. The aerospace and gas turbine industries have shown interest in the EBM and the SLM processes to enable topology-optimized designs, parts with lattice structures and part consolidation. However, to realize such advantages, factors affecting the mechanical properties must be well understood – especially the fatigue properties. In the context of fatigue performance, apart from the effect of different phases in the material, the effect of defects in terms of both the amount and distribution and the effect of “rough” as-built surface must be studied in detail. Fatigue properties of Alloy 718, a Ni-Fe based superalloy widely used in the aerospace engines is investigated in this study. Four point bending fatigue tests have been performed at 20 Hz in room temperature at different stress ranges to compare the performance of the EBM and the SLM material to the wrought material. The experiment aims to assess the differences in fatigue properties between the two powder bed AM processes as well as assess the effect of two post-treatment methods namely – machining and hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Fractography and metallography have been performed to explain the observed properties. Both HIPing and machining improve the fatigue performance; however, a large scatter is observed for machined specimens. Fatigue properties of SLM material approach that of wrought material while in EBM material defects severely affect the fatigue life. © 2018 Elsevier B.V.

  • 32.
    Beaubert, Francois
    et al.
    Valenciennes University.
    Pálsson, Halldór
    University of Iceland.
    Lalot, Sylvain
    Valenciennes University.
    Choquet, Isabelle
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Bauduin, Hadrian
    Valenciennes University.
    Design of a device to induce swirling flow in pipes: A rational approach2015In: Comptes rendus. Mecanique, ISSN 1631-0721, E-ISSN 1873-7234, Vol. 343, no 1, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, a rational approach is proposed to design a device for inducing swirling flow in heat exchanger pipes, for improved efficiency in the laminar regime. First, 2D computational fluid dynamics results lead to select, among four profiles, the blade profile with the most favorable lift to drag ratio. Then, the fluid flow in the swirler made with the selected blade profile is simulated in 3D, for Reynolds numbers ranging from 50 to 1600. Based on the simulation results, an analytic approximation of the evolution of the tangential fluid velocity is proposed as a function of the Reynolds number.

  • 33.
    Bhardwaj, Sanjay
    et al.
    International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Hyderabad, India.
    Padmanabham, G.
    International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Hyderabad, India.
    Jain, Karuna
    National Institute of Industrial Engineering (NITIE), Mumbai, India.
    Srinivasa Rao, D.
    International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Hyderabad, India.
    Joshi, Shrikant V.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Technology commercialization in advanced materials sector: Indian context2017In: Journal of Intellectual Property Rights, ISSN 0971-7544, E-ISSN 0975-1076, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 154-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is aimed at developing insights into the Technology Value Chain (TVC) of advanced materials-based technologies using a scenario in which technology has been transferred by a Research and Technology Organization (RTO) to a Small and Medium Enterprise (SME) in the Indian context. A Conceptual Theoretical Model (CTM) using constructs from existing TVC models is used as a basis for the case study described in this paper. This model is refined using actual evidence from an Indian RTO - the International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Hyderabad. The TVC of ARCI’s proprietary Detonation Spray Coating (DSC) technology is used to expand upon the CTM as well as to provide new insights wherever possible. The TVC adopted for DSC includes technology incubation and proof of concept in advance of transferring the technology. These strategies, aided by government funding of the technology recipient companies, were observed to play an important role in successful commercialization. © 2017, National Institute of Science Communication and Information Resources (NISCAIR). All rights reserved.

  • 34.
    Björklund, Stefan
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Förbättrad lönsamhet för biogasanläggningar genom beläggning av knivar2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Björklund, Stefan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Goel, Sneha
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Joshi, Shrikant V.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Function-dependent coating architectures by hybrid powder-suspension plasma spraying: Injector design, processing and concept validation2018In: Materials & design, ISSN 0264-1275, E-ISSN 1873-4197, Vol. 142, p. 56-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The attractive properties achieved by Suspension Plasma Spraying (SPS), combined with the availability of high throughput capable plasma spray systems that permit axial feeding, provide encouragement to explore use of suspensions for next generation functional applications. This paper deals with realization of coatings with various pre-determined function-dependent architectures by employing a hybrid powder-suspension feedstock. Some illustrative application-relevant coating architecture designs are discussed, along with the specific benefits that can accrue by deploying a multi-scale powder-suspension feedstock combination. An elegant feedstock delivery arrangement to enable either simultaneous or sequential feeding of powders and suspensions to enable convenient processing of coatings with desired architectures is presented. As proof-of-concept, deposition of layered, composite and functionally graded coatings using the above system is also demonstrated using appropriate case studies

  • 36.
    Bolelli, G.
    et al.
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria 'Enzo Ferrari', Via P. Vivarelli 10/1, Modena, MO, Italy .
    Berger, L.-M.
    Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik (IWS), Winterbergstr. 28, Dresden, Germany.
    Börner, T.
    Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik (IWS), Winterbergstr. 28, Dresden, Germany.
    Koivuluoto, H.
    Tampere University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, Korkeakoulunkatu 6, Tampere, Finland .
    Matikainen, V.
    Tampere University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, Korkeakoulunkatu 6, Tampere, Finland .
    Lusvarghi, L.
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria 'Enzo Ferrari', Via P. Vivarelli 10/1, Modena, MO, Italy .
    Lyphout, Christophe
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Sassatelli, P.
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria 'Enzo Ferrari', Via P. Vivarelli 10/1, Modena, MO, Italy .
    Trache, R.
    Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik (IWS), Winterbergstr. 28, Dresden, Germany .
    Vuoristo, P.c
    Tampere University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, Korkeakoulunkatu 6, Tampere, Finlan.
    Sliding and abrasive wear behaviour of HVOF- and HVAF-sprayed Cr3C2-NiCr hardmetal coatings2016In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 358-359, p. 32-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides a comprehensive characterisation of HVOF- and HVAF-sprayed Cr3C2–25 wt.% NiCr hardmetal coatings. One commercial powder composition with two different particle size distributions was processed using five HVOF and HVAF thermal spray systems.All coatings contain less Cr3C2 than the feedstock powder, possibly due to the rebound of some Cr3C2-rich particles during high-velocity impact onto the substrate.Dry sand-rubber wheel abrasive wear testing causes both grooving and pull-out of splat fragments. Mass losses depend on inter- and intra-lamellar cohesion, being higher (≥70 mg after a wear distance of 5904 m) for the coatings deposited with the coarser feedstock powder or with one type of HVAF torch.Sliding wear at room temperature against alumina involves shallower abrasive grooving, small-scale delamination and carbide pull-outs, and it is controlled by intra-lamellar cohesion. The coatings obtained from the fine feedstock powder exhibit the lowest wear rates (≈5x10−6 mm3/(Nm)). At 400 °C, abrasive grooving dominates the sliding wear behaviour; wear rates increase by one order of magnitude but friction coefficients decrease from ≈0.7 to ≈0.5. The thermal expansion coefficient of the coatings (11.08x10−6 °C−1 in the 30–400 °C range) is sufficiently close to that of the steel substrate (14.23x10−6 °C−1) to avoid macro-cracking

  • 37.
    Bonilla Hernández, Ana Esther
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    On cutting tool resource management2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The search for increased productivity and cost reduction in machining can be interpreted as desire to increase the Material Removal Rate, , and maximize the cutting tool utilization. The CNC process is complex and involves numerous constraints and parameters; ranging from tolerances to machinability. A well-managed preparation process creates the foundation for achieving a reduction in manufacturing errors and machining time. Along the preparation process of the NC-program, two different studies have been performed and are presented in this thesis. One study examined the CAM programming process from the Lean perspective. The other study includes an evaluation of how the cutting tools are used in terms of and tool utilization. Two distinct combinations of cutting data might provide the same . However, the tool life and machining cost can be different. Therefore, selection of appropriate cutting parameters that best meet all these objectives is challenging. An algorithm for analysis and efficient selection of cutting data for maximal , maximal tool utilization and minimal machining cost has been developed and is presented in this work. The presented algorithm shortens the time dedicated to the optimized cutting data selection and the needed iterations along the program development. Furthermore, the objectives that need to be considered during the estimation of the manufacturing processes sustainability have been identified. In addition, this thesis also includes a theoretical study to estimate energy use, CO2-footprint and water consumption during the manufacture of a workpiece, which can be invaluable for companies in their search for sustainability of their manufacturing processes.

  • 38.
    Bonilla Hernández, Ana Esther
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West. GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Fredriksson, Claes
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Industrial Engineering and Management, Electrical- and Mechanical Engineering.
    Energy and Cost Estimation of a Feature-based Machining Operation on HRSA2017In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 61, no Supplement C, p. 511-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forward-looking manufacturing companies aim for sustainable production with low environmental footprint. This is true also for aerospace engine-makers, although their environmental impact mostly occurs during the use-phase of their products. Materials, such as Nickel alloys, are used for special applications where other materials will not withstand tough working conditions in terms of pressure and temperature. Heat Resistant Super Alloys are, however, considered difficult to machine and cutting tools will wear off rapidly. In this paper, a simple way to estimate the energy required, the cost and environmental footprint to produce a work piece using standard engineering software is presented. The results show that for a hypothetical 3 tonne work piece, Inconel 718 will be considerably cheaper and require less water but will require more energy, and has considerably larger CO2 footprint than Waspaloy.

  • 39.
    Bonilla Hernández, Ana Esther
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Repo, Jari
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Wretland, Anders
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Analysis of Tool Utilization from Material Removal Rate Perspective2015In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 29, p. 109-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An end of life strategy algorithm has been used to study a CNC program to evaluate how the cutting inserts are used in terms of their full utilization. Utilized tool life (UTL) and remaining tool life (RTL) were used to evaluate if the insert has been used to its limits of expected tool life, or contributing to an accumulated tool waste. It is demonstrated that possible means to improvement exists to increase the material removal rate (MRR), thereby using the insert until its remaining tool life is as close to zero as possible. It was frequently found that inserts were used well below their maximum performance with respect to cutting velocity.

  • 40.
    Bonilla Hernández, Ana Esther
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Repo, Jari
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Wretland, Anders
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Integrated optimization model for cutting data selection based on maximal MRR and tool utilization in continuous machining operations2016In: CIRP - Journal of Manufacturing Science and Technology, ISSN 1755-5817, E-ISSN 1878-0016, Vol. 13, p. 46-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The search for increased productivity can be interpreted as the increase of material removal rate (MRR). Namely, increase of feed, depth of cut and/or cutting speed. The increase of any of these three variables, will increase the tool wear rate; therefore decreasing its tool life according to the same tool life criteria. This paper proposes an integrated model for efficient selection of cutting data for maximal MRR and maximal tool utilization. The results show that, it is possible to obtain a limited range of cutting parameters from where the CAM Programmer can select the cutting data assuring both objectives.

  • 41.
    Bonilla Hernández, Ana Esther
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Repo, Jari
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Wretland, Anders
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems AB, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Streamlining the CAM programming process by Lean Principles within the aerospace industryManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Broberg, Patrik
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation Systems.
    Analytic model for pulsed thermography of subsurface defects2014In: Archives QIRT 2014: Documents and sessions presented during the 12nd conference QIRT (Bordeaux, France), QIRT , 2014, p. 1-5Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An analytic solution to the heat equation is used to model the response of subsurface defects in pulsed thermography. The model is compared to measurement data and shows good agreement, both in spatial and temporaldomain. The capability of the model is then demonstrated by calculating the response of arbitrary defects at different depth. This model, even though simplified, can prove useful due to good accuracy and low computational time forcomparing analysis methods and for evaluating a thermography method on a new material or new type of defect.

  • 43.
    Broberg, Patrik
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production System.
    Runnemalm, Anna
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production System.
    Analysis algorithm for surface crack detection by thermography with UV light excitation2016In: Quantitative InfraRed Thermography 2016: Abstracts / [ed] Kaczmarek, M. & Bujnowski, A., Gdańsk, Poland: Publishing Gdańsk University of Technology , 2016, p. 144-149Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface crack defects can be detected by IR thermograpgy due to the high absorption of energy within the crack cavity. It is often difficult to detect the defect in the raw data, since the signal easily drowns in the background. It is therefore important to have good analysis algorithms that can reduce the background and enhance the defect. Here an analysis algorithm is presented which significantly increases the signal to noise ratio of the defects and reduces the image sequence from the camera to one image.

  • 44.
    Broberg, Patrik
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Runnemalm, Anna
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Detection of Surface Cracks in Welds using Active Thermography2012In: Proceedings18th World Conference on Non-Destructive Testing: 16 - 20 April 2012, Durban, South Africa, South African Institute for Non-Destructive Testing (SAINT) , 2012, p. 1-5Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface cracks in welds can be detected using several non-destructive testing methods; among the more popular ones are eddy current, penetrant and magnetic particle testing. For an automatic inspection cell, the traditional techniques have limitations. Here we have investigated the possibility of using active thermography for detecting surface cracks in welds. This technique features advantages such as non-contact and high speed. The weld is illuminated using an infrared light source. Due to higher energy absorption in a surface crack, the defect will be identified as a hot spot when imaged by an infrared camera. Artificial weld defects (notches) are investigated by use of active thermography. Results from an inspection of real longitudinal cold cracks in a weld are also presented. The results show that active thermography looks promising for detection of even small cracks and notches, as long as they are open to the surface.

  • 45.
    Cederberg, Emil
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Influence of welding and additive manufacturing thermal cycles on microstructure and properties of super duplex stainless steel base and weld metal studied by a physical simulation technique2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Super duplex stainless steel (SDSS) is known for its excellent combination of high corrosion resistance and strength. However, the main limitations in SDSS applications are the risk of getting an imbalanced ferrite and austenite fraction and the sensitivity to form intermetallic phases at temperatures between approximately 600-1000 °C. During welding of SDSS, the welding parameters must be selected carefully in order to avoid formation of intermetallic phases such as sigma phase due to slow cooling or multiple reheating. In addition, special care is needed to have a balanced ferrite and austenite fraction. In this work, the influence of multiple thermal cycles and cooling rate on the microstructure of SDSS base and weld metal was investigated. A novel heat treatment method, using a stationary TIG arc, was performed to produce the samples. The test discs were composed of base and weld metal. Five samples were produced including 1, 5, and 15 passes of rapid cooling, one sample with medium cooling and one with slow cooling. The cooling time between 1000-700 °C was aimed at being similar for the pair of 5 passes and medium cooling and the other pair of 15 passes and slow cooling. The material was characterized by light optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy while hardness mapping and sensitization testing were employed to evaluate the properties. It was revealed that sigma phase was more prone to precipitate in the weld compared to the base metal when exposed to high ageing temperature and repeated thermal cycles. Slow cooling was found to promote sigma phase precipitation more than multiple reheating in the weld metal. In the base metal, a minor difference was found between the slowly cooled and multiple reheated samples. Rapid cooling in multiple reheating generated nitrides in the fusion boundary zone. As more reheating passes were applied, the amount of nitrides decreased. Multipass reheating cycles also resulted in increased hardness and nitrogen depletion adjacent to the fusion boundary zone causing the ferrite content to increase. Based on this study, less sigma phase precipitation in the weld metal was achieved when using multiple reheating passes with low heat input instead of a few passes with high heat input, providing equal accumulative heating time between 1000-700 °C. However, the influence of multiple reheating on the hardness was larger compared to slow cooling.

  • 46.
    Cernuschi, F.
    et al.
    RSE – Ricerca per il Sistema Energetico, Via Rubattino, 54, 20134 Milano.
    Lorenzoni, L.
    RSE – Ricerca per il Sistema Energetico, Via Rubattino, 54, 20134 Milano.
    Capelli, S.
    RSE – Ricerca per il Sistema Energetico, Via Rubattino, 54, 20134 Milano.
    Guardamagna, C.
    RSE – Ricerca per il Sistema Energetico, Via Rubattino, 54, 20134 Milano.
    Karger, M.
    Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energieforschung IEF-1, 52425 Jülich.
    Vaßen, R.
    Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energieforschung IEF-1, 52425 Jülich.
    von Niessen, K.
    Sulzer Metco AG, Rigackerstr. 16, CH-5610, Wohlen.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Menuey, J.
    Snecma, 1 Rue Maryse Bastié, 86100 Châtellerault.
    Giolli, C.
    Turbocoating SpA, Via Mistrali 7, Rubbiano di Solignano,.
    Solid particle erosion of thermal spray and physical vapour deposition thermal barrier coatings2011In: Wear, Vol. 271, no 11-12, p. 2909-2918Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are used to protect hot path components of gas turbines from hot combustion gases. For a number of decades, in the case of aero engines TBCs are usually deposited by electron beam physical vapour deposition (EB-PVD). EB-PVD coatings have a columnar microstructure that guarantees high strain compliance and better solid particle erosion than PS TBCs. The main drawback of EB-PVD coating is the deposition cost that is higher than that of air plasma sprayed (APS) TBC. The major scientific and technical objective of the UE project TOPPCOAT was the development of improved TBC systems using advanced bonding concepts in combination with additional protective functional coatings. The first specific objective was to use these developments to provide a significant improvement to state-of-the-art APS coatings and hence provide a cost-effective alternative to EB-PVD. In this perspective one standard porous APS, two segmented APS, one EB-PVD and one PS-PVD™ were tested at 700°C in a solid particle erosion jet tester, with EB-PVD and standard porous APS being the two reference systems.Tests were performed at impingement angles of 30° and 90°, representative for particle impingement on trailing and leading edges of gas turbine blades and vanes, respectively. Microquartz was chosen as the erodent being one of the main constituents of sand and fly volcanic ashes. After the end of the tests, the TBC microstructure was investigated using electron microscopy to characterise the failure mechanisms taking place in the TBC.It was found that PS-PVD™ and highly segmented TBCs showed erosion rates comparable or better than EB-PVD samples. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  • 47.
    Charles Murgau, Corinne
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Avdelningen för svetsteknologi (SV).
    Microstructure model for Ti-6Al-4V used in simulation of additive manufacturing2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is devoted to microstructure modelling of Ti-6Al-4V. The microstructure and the mechanical properties of titanium alloys are highly dependent on the temperature history experienced by the material. The developed microstructure model accounts for thermaldriving forces and is applicable for general temperature histories. It has been applied to study wire feed additive manufacturing processes that induce repetitive heating and cooling cycles.The microstructure model adopts internal state variables to represent the microstructure through microstructure constituents' fractions in finite element simulation. This makes it possible to apply the model efficiently for large computational models of general thermomechanical processes. The model is calibrated and validated versus literature data. It is applied to Gas Tungsten Arc Welding -also known as Tungsten Inert Gas welding-wire feed additive manufacturing process.Four quantities are calculated in the model: the volume fraction of phase, consisting of Widmanstätten, grain boundary, and martensite. The phase transformations during cooling are modelled based on diffusional theory described by a Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov formulation, except for diffusionless martensite formation where the Koistinen-Marburger equation is used. A parabolic growth rate equation is used for the to transformation upon heating. An added variable, structure size indicator of Widmanstätten, has also been implemented and calibrated. It is written in a simple Arrhenius format.The microstructure model is applied to in finite element simulation of wire feed additive manufacturing. Finally, coupling with a physically based constitutive model enables a comprehensive and predictive model of the properties that evolve during processing.

  • 48.
    Charles Murgau, Corinne
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Avdelningen för svetsteknologi (SV).
    Lundbäck, Andreas
    Division of Mechanics of Solid Materials, Luleå University of Technology, 971 81 Luleå, Sweden .
    Åkerfeldt, Pia
    Division of Materials Science, Luleå University of Technology, 971 81 Luleå, Sweden .
    Pederson, Robert
    GKN Aerospace Engine Systems, 461 81 Trollhättan, Sweden .
    Temperature and microstructure evolution in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding wire feed additive manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4VArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Finite Element Method (FEM) is used to solve temperature field and microstructure evolution during GTAW wire feed additive manufacturing process.The microstructure of titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V is computed based on the temperature evolution in a point-wise logic. The methodology concerning the microstructural modeling is presented. A model to predict the thickness of the Į lath morphology is also implemented. The results from simulations are presented togethe rwith qualitative and quantitative microstructure analysis.

  • 49.
    Chazelas, Christophe
    et al.
    European Ceramic Center, SPCTS CNRS UMR 7315, University of Limoges, Limoges, France.
    Trelles, Juan Pablo
    Mechanical Engineering, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, USA.
    Choquet, Isabelle
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Welding Technology.
    Vardelle, Armelle
    European Ceramic Center, SPCTS CNRS UMR 7315, University of Limoges, Limoges, France.
    Main issues for a fully predictive plasma spray torch model and numerical considerations2017In: Plasma chemistry and plasma processing, ISSN 0272-4324, E-ISSN 1572-8986, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 627-651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plasma spray is one of the most versatile and established techniques for the deposition of thick coatings that provide functional surfaces to protect or improve the performance of the substrate material. However, a greater understanding of plasma spray torch operation will result in improved control of process and coating properties and in the development of novel plasma spray processes and applications. The operation of plasma torches is controlled by coupled dynamic, thermal, chemical, electromagnetic, and acoustic phenomena that take place at different time and space scales. Computational modeling makes it possible to gain important insight into torch characteristics that are not practically accessible to experimental observations, such as the dynamics of the arc inside the plasma torch. This article describes the current main issues in carrying out plasma spray torch numerical simulations at a high level of fidelity. These issues encompass the use of non-chemical and non-thermodynamic equilibrium models, incorporation of electrodes with sheath models in the computational domain, and resolution of rapid transient events, including the so-called arc reattachment process. Practical considerations regarding model implementation are also discussed, particularly the need for the model to naturally reproduce the observed torch operation modes in terms of voltage and pressure fluctuations.

  • 50.
    Chen, Y.
    et al.
    University of Manchester, School of Materials, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Zhao, X.
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced High-Temperature Materials and Precision Forming, Shanghai, China .
    Dang, Y.
    University of Manchester, School of Materials, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Xiao, Ping
    University of Manchester, School of Materials, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Curry, Nicholas
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Mechanical Engineering.
    Markocsan, Nicolaie
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Nylén, Per
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Characterization and understanding of residual stresses in a NiCoCrAlY bond coat for thermal barrier coating application2015In: Acta Materialia, ISSN 1359-6454, E-ISSN 1873-2453, Vol. 94, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The residual stresses in a NiCoCrAlY bond coat deposited on a Ni-base superalloy substrate after oxidation at 1150 °C were studied by X-ray diffraction using the sin2Ψ technique. The stresses were found to be tensile; they first increased and then decreased with oxidation time. High temperature stress measurement indicated that the stress developed and built up upon cooling, predominantly within the temperature range from 1150 °C to 600 °C. Microstructural examination suggested that, due to the limited penetration depth into the bond coat, the X-ray only probed the stress in a thin surface layer consisting of the single γ-phase formed through Al depletion during oxidation. Quantitative high temperature X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that, above 600 °C, the volume fraction of the β-phase in the bond coat increased with decreasing temperature. The mechanisms of stress generation in the bond coat were examined and are discussed based on the experiments designed to isolate the contribution of possible stress generation factors. It was found that the measured bond coat stresses were mainly induced by the volume change of the bond coat associated with the precipitation of the β-phase upon cooling.

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