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  • 1.
    Aranke, Omkar
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Algenaid, Wael
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Subtractive and Additive Manufacturing.
    Awe, Samuel
    R and D Department, Automotive Components Floby AB, Floby, 52151, Sweden.
    Joshi, Shrikant V.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Research Enviroment Production Technology West.
    Coatings for automotive gray cast iron brake discs: A review2019In: Coatings, ISSN 2079-6412, Vol. 9, no 9, article id 552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gray cast iron (GCI) is a popular automotive brake disc material by virtue of its high melting point as well as excellent heat storage and damping capability. GCI is also attractive because of its good castability and machinability, combined with its cost-effectiveness. Although several lightweight alloys have been explored as alternatives in an attempt to achieve weight reduction, their widespread use has been limited by low melting point and high inherent costs. Therefore, GCI is still the preferred material for brake discs due to its robust performance. However, poor corrosion resistance and excessive wear of brake disc material during service continue to be areas of concern, with the latter leading to brake emissions in the form of dust and particulate matter that have adverse effects on human health. With the exhaust emission norms becoming increasingly stringent, it is important to address the problem of brake disc wear without compromising the braking performance of the material. Surface treatment of GCI brake discs in the form of a suitable coating represents a promising solution to this problem. This paper reviews the different coating technologies and materials that have been traditionally used and examines the prospects of some emergent thermal spray technologies, along with the industrial implications of adopting them for brake disc applications. © 2019 by the authors.

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  • 2.
    Chatzigiannakou, Maria Angeliki
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Potapenko, Tatiana
    Uppsala University, Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ekergård, Boel
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Industrial Engineering and Management, Electrical- and Mechanical Engineering.
    Temiz, Irina
    Uppsala University, Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Numerical analysis of an Uppsala University WEC deployment by a barge for different sea states2020In: Ocean Engineering, ISSN 0029-8018, E-ISSN 1873-5258, Vol. 205, article id 107287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wave energy converters (WECs) have been deployed onshore, nearshore, and offshore to convert ocean wave movement into electricity. The exploitation of renewable energy sources has restrictions; in the case of wave energy, high installation, maintenance, and decommissioning costs have limited their commercial use. Moreover, these offshore operations can be compromised by safety issues. This paper draws attention to offshore operation safety of a WEC developed by Uppsala University. Specifically, this paper investigates what sea states are suitable for the safe deployment of a WEC from a barge. This study follows recommendations in DNV-RP-H103 for analysis of offshore operations, namely lifting through the wave zone. ANSYS Aqwa is used to find hydrodynamic forces acting on a typical barge, using frequency domain analysis. Based on these hydrodynamic simulation results and methodology given in DNV-RP-H103, tables are created to show the sea states that would allow for the safe installation of a WEC using a typical barge. Considered sea states have significant wave heights varying between 0 m and 3 m and the wave zero crossing periods varying between 3 s and 13 s. The WEC submersions are considered between 0 m and 7 m, i.e. when the WEC is in the air until it is fully submerged. © 2020 Elsevier Ltd

  • 3.
    De Backer, Jeroen
    et al.
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Electrical and Automation Engineering.
    Soron, Mikael
    ESAB Welding AB .
    Ilar, Torbjörn
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Engineering.
    Christiansson, Anna-Karin
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Process and Product Development.
    Friction stir welding with robot for light vehicle design2010In: Proceedings from the 8th International Friction Stir Welding Symposium: Timmendorfer Strand, Germany 18-20 May 2010, The Welding Institute , 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Reducing weight is one of the enablers to design more environmentally friendly vehicles. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) supports low weight design through its capability to join different combinations of light weight materials, e.g. different aluminium alloys, but also through its possibilities in producing continuous joints. StiRoLight is a recently started project for robotised FSW for joining of light weight materials emphasising on the vehicle industry, an industry with a long-time experience of robotic welding. The first task involves investigation of force feedback for maintaining the desired contact force. Another important aspect in robotised FSW is the compliance of the robot, which may result in deviations from the pre-programmed path as a result of the high process forces experienced during the welding operation. The further exploration of three-dimensional FSW seams and definition of the process windows will be part of further research within this project.

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