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  • 1.
    Chang, Lei
    et al.
    University of Macau, Department of Psychology, China.
    Lu, Hui Jing
    The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Department of Applied Social Sciences, China.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Chen, Bin Bin
    Fudan University, Department of Psychology, Shanghai, China.
    Tian, Qian
    Fudan University, Department of Psychology, Shanghai, China.
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples “Federico II”, Department of Psychology, Italy.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, USA.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Rome, Italy.
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan .
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Maseno, Kenya.
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Rome University La Sapienza, Faculty of Psycholog , Rome, Italy .
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Medellín, Colombia.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Environmental harshness and unpredictability, life history, and social and academic behavior of adolescents in nine countries.2019In: Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0012-1649, E-ISSN 1939-0599, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 890-903Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Safety is essential for life. To survive, humans and other animals have developed sets of psychological and physiological adaptations known as life history (LH) tradeoff strategies in response to various safety constraints. Evolutionarily selected LH strategies in turn regulate development and behavior to optimize survival under prevailing safety conditions. The present study tested LH hypotheses concerning safety based on a 6-year longitudinal sample of 1,245 adolescents and their parents from 9 countries. The results revealed that, invariant across countries, environmental harshness, and unpredictability (lack of safety) was negatively associated with slow LH behavioral profile, measured 2 years later, and slow LH behavioral profile was negatively and positively associated with externalizing behavior and academic performance, respectively, as measured an additional 2 years later. These results support the evolutionary conception that human development responds to environmental safety cues through LH regulation of social and learning behaviors. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).

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