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  • 1.
    Auffret, Alistair G.
    et al.
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, (SWE).
    Vangansbeke, Pieter
    Forest & Nature Lab, Department of Environment, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Melle-Gontrode (BEL).
    De Frenne, Pieter
    Forest & Nature Lab, Department of Environment, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Melle-Gontrode (BEL).
    Auestad, Inger
    Department of Environmental Sciences, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Sogndal (NOR).
    Basto, Sofía
    Unidad de Ecología y Sistemática, Departamento de Biología, Facultad de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá (COL).
    Grandin, Ulf
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, (SWE).
    Jacquemyn, Hans
    Plant Conservation and Population Biology, Biology Department, KU Leuven, Heverlee (BEL).
    Jakobsson, Anna
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Kalamees, Rein
    Institute of Ecology and Earth Sciences, University of Tartu, Tartu, (EST); Tallinn Botanic Garden, Tallinn, (EST).
    Koch, Marcus A.
    Centre for Organismal Studies (COS) Heidelberg, Department of Biodiversity and Plant Systematics, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg (DEU).
    Marrs, Rob
    School of Environmental Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (GBR).
    Marteinsdóttir, Bryndís
    The Soil Conservation Service of Iceland, Hella (ISL).
    Wagner, Markus
    UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Wallingford (GBR).
    Bekker, Renée M.
    Groningen Institute of Archaeology, University of Groningen, Groningen (NLD).
    Bruun, Hans Henrik
    Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (DNK).
    Decocq, Guillaume
    Jules Verne University of Picardie, Amiens Cedex 1,(FRA).
    Hermy, Martin
    Dept. Earth & Environmental Sciences, KU Leuven, Heverlee (BEL).
    Jankowska-Błaszczuk, Małgorzata
    Environmental Biology Department, Jan Kochanowski University in Kielce, Kielce (POL).
    Milberg, Per
    IFM Biology, Linköping University, Linköping (SWE).
    Måren, Inger E.
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Bergen, Bergen (NOR).
    Pakeman, Robin J.
    The James Hutton Institute, Aberdeen (GBR).
    Phoenix, Gareth K.
    School of Biosciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, (GBR).
    Thompson, Ken
    School of Biosciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (GBR).
    Van Calster, Hans
    Research Institute for Nature and Forest, Brussels (BEL).
    Vandvik, Vigdis
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Bergen, Bergen (NOR).
    Plue, Jan
    Swedish Biodiversity Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (SWE).
    More warm-adapted species in soil seed banks than in herb layer plant communities across Europe2023In: Journal of Ecology, ISSN 0022-0477, E-ISSN 1365-2745, Vol. 111, no 5, p. 1009-1020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Responses to climate change have often been found to lag behind the rate of warming that has occurred. In addition to dispersal limitation potentially restricting spread at leading range margins, the persistence of species in new and unsuitable conditions is thought to be responsible for apparent time-lags. Soil seed banks can allow plant communities to temporarily buffer unsuitable environmental conditions, but their potential to slow responses to long-term climate change is largely unknown. As local forest cover can also buffer the effects of a warming climate, it is important to understand how seed banks might interact with land cover to mediate community responses to climate change. We first related species-level seed bank persistence and distribution-derived climatic niches for 840 plant species. We then used a database of plant community data from grasslands, forests and intermediate successional habitats from across Europe to investigate relationships between seed banks and their corresponding herb layers in 2763 plots in the context of climate and land cover. We found that species from warmer climates and with broader distributions are more likely to have a higher seed bank persistence, resulting in seed banks that are composed of species with warmer and broader climatic distributions than their corresponding herb layers. This was consistent across our climatic extent, with larger differences (seed banks from even warmer climates relative to vegetation) found in grasslands. Synthesis. Seed banks have been shown to buffer plant communities through periods of environmental variability, and in a period of climate change might be expected to contain species reflecting past, cooler conditions. Here, we show that persistent seed banks often contain species with relatively warm climatic niches and those with wide climatic ranges. Although these patterns may not be primarily driven by species’ climatic adaptations, the prominence of such species in seed banks might still facilitate climate-driven community shifts. Additionally, seed banks may be related to ongoing trends regarding the spread of widespread generalist species into natural habitats, while cool-associated species may be at risk from both short- and long-term climatic variability and change. 

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  • 2.
    Chang, Lei
    et al.
    University of Macau, Department of Psychology, China.
    Lu, Hui Jing
    The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Department of Applied Social Sciences, China.
    Lansford, Jennifer E.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Skinner, Ann T.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Bornstein, Marc H.
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Steinberg, Laurence
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
    Dodge, Kenneth A.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Chen, Bin Bin
    Fudan University, Department of Psychology, Shanghai, China.
    Tian, Qian
    Fudan University, Department of Psychology, Shanghai, China.
    Bacchini, Dario
    University of Naples “Federico II”, Department of Psychology, Italy.
    Deater-Deckard, Kirby
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, USA.
    Pastorelli, Concetta
    Università di Roma La Sapienza, Rome, Italy.
    Alampay, Liane Peña
    Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Sorbring, Emma
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology, Pedagogy and Sociology.
    Al-Hassan, Suha M.
    Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan .
    Oburu, Paul
    Maseno University, Maseno, Kenya.
    Malone, Patrick S.
    Duke University, Center for Child and Family Policy, Durham, NC, USA.
    Di Giunta, Laura
    Rome University La Sapienza, Faculty of Psycholog , Rome, Italy .
    Tirado, Liliana Maria Uribe
    Universidad San Buenaventura, Medellín, Colombia.
    Tapanya, Sombat
    Chiang Mai University, Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Environmental harshness and unpredictability, life history, and social and academic behavior of adolescents in nine countries.2019In: Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0012-1649, E-ISSN 1939-0599, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 890-903Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Safety is essential for life. To survive, humans and other animals have developed sets of psychological and physiological adaptations known as life history (LH) tradeoff strategies in response to various safety constraints. Evolutionarily selected LH strategies in turn regulate development and behavior to optimize survival under prevailing safety conditions. The present study tested LH hypotheses concerning safety based on a 6-year longitudinal sample of 1,245 adolescents and their parents from 9 countries. The results revealed that, invariant across countries, environmental harshness, and unpredictability (lack of safety) was negatively associated with slow LH behavioral profile, measured 2 years later, and slow LH behavioral profile was negatively and positively associated with externalizing behavior and academic performance, respectively, as measured an additional 2 years later. These results support the evolutionary conception that human development responds to environmental safety cues through LH regulation of social and learning behaviors. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).

  • 3.
    Herbertsson, Lina
    et al.
    Centre for Environmental and Climate Science, Lund University, Lund (SWE).
    Ekroos, Johan
    Centre for Environmental and Climate Science, Lund University, Lund (SWE).
    Albrecht, M.
    Agroscope, Agroecology and Environment, Zürich (CHE).
    Bartomeus, Ignasi
    Doñana Biological Station, Seville (ESP).
    Batáry, Péter
    Centre for Ecological Research, Institute of Ecology and Botany, Lendület Landscape and Conservation Ecology, Vácrátót (HUN).
    Bommarco, Riccardo
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (SWE).
    Caplat, Paul
    Centre for Environmental and Climate Science, Lund University, Lund (SWE).
    Diekötter, Tim
    Institute for Natural Resource Conservation, Department of Landscape Ecology, Kiel University, Kiel (DEU).
    Eikestam, Jenny M.
    Centre for Environmental and Climate Science, Lund University, Lund (SWE).
    Entling, Martin H.
    Institute for Environmental Sciences, University Koblenz - Landau, Landau (DEU).
    Farbu, Sunniva
    Centre for Environmental and Climate Science, Lund University, Lund (SWE).
    Farwig, Nina
    Department of Biology, Conservation Ecology, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Marburg (DEU).
    Gonzalez-Varo, Juan P.
    Estación Biológica de Doñana EBD-CSIC, Department of Integrative Ecology, Sevilla (ESP).
    Hass, Annika L.
    Functional Agrobiodiversity, University of Göttingen, Göttingen (DEU).
    Holzschuh, Anderea
    University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (DEU).
    Hopfenmüller, Sebastian
    Department of Animal Ecology and Tropical Biology, Biocenter, University of Würzburg, Würzburg (DEU).
    Jakobsson, Anna
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Jauker, Birgit
    Department of Animal Ecology, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Giessen (DEU).
    Kovács-Hostyánszki, Anikó
    Lendület Ecosystem Services Research Group, Institute of Ecology and Botany, Centre for Ecological Research, Vácrátót (HUN).
    Kleve, Wera
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (SWE).
    Kunin, William E.
    University of Leeds, Leeds (GBR).
    Lindström, Sandra A. M.
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (SWE).
    Mullen, Sarah
    School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin (IRL).
    Öckinger, Erik
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (SWE).
    Petanidou, Theodora
    Department of Geography, University of the Aegean, Mytilene (GRC).
    Potts, Simon G.
    University of Reading, Reading (GBR).
    Power, Eileen F.
    School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin (IRL).
    Rundlöf, Maj
    Department of Biology, Lund University, Lund (SWE).
    Seibel, Kathrin
    Centre for Environmental and Climate Science, Lund University, Lund (SWE).
    Söber, Virve
    Department of Zoology, Institute of Ecology and Earth Sciences, University of Tartu, Tartu (EST).
    Söderman, Annika
    Centre for Environmental and Climate Science, Lund University, Lund (SWE).
    Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf
    University of Würzburg, Würzburg (DEU).
    Stout, Jane C.
    School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin (IRL).
    Teder, Tiit
    University of Tartu, Tartu (EST).
    Tscharntke, Teja
    Agroecology, University of Göttingen, Göttingen (DEU).
    Smith, Henrik G.
    Centre for Environmental and Climate Science, Lund University, Lund (SWE).
    Bees increase seed set of wild plants while the proportion of arable land has a variable effect on pollination in European agricultural landscapes2021In: Plant Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2032-3913, E-ISSN 2032-3921, Vol. 154, no 3, p. 341-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: Agricultural intensification and loss of farmland heterogeneity have contributed to population declines of wild bees and other pollinators, which may have caused subsequent declines in insect-pollinated wild plants.

    Material and methods: Using data from 37 studies on 22 pollinator-dependent wild plant species across Europe, we investigated whether flower visitation and seed set of insect-pollinated plants decline with an increasing proportion of arable land within 1 km.

    Key results: Seed set increased with increasing flower visitation by bees, most of which were wild bees, but not with increasing flower visitation by other insects. Increasing proportion of arable land had a strongly variable effect on seed set and flower visitation by bees across studies.

    Conclusion:Factors such as landscape configuration, local habitat quality, and temporally changing resource availability (e.g. due to mass-flowering crops or honey bee hives) could have modified the effect of arable land on pollination. While our results highlight that the persistence of wild bees is crucial to maintain plant diversity, we also show that pollen limitation due to declining bee populations in homogenized agricultural landscapes is not a universal driver causing parallel losses of bees and insect-pollinated plants. 

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    Plant Ecology and Evolution
  • 4.
    Plue, Jan
    et al.
    Stockholm University (SWE).
    Auestad, Inger
    Western Norway University of Applied Sciences (NOR).
    Basto, Sofia
    Pontifical Xavierian University (ITA).
    Bekker, Reneé M.
    University of Groningen (NLD).
    Bruun, Hans Henrik
    University of Copenhagen (DNK).
    Chevalier, Richard,
    National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment (FRA).
    Decocq, Guillaume
    University of Picardie Jules Verne (FRA).
    Grandin, Ulf
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SWE).
    Hermy, Martin
    KU Leuven (NLD).
    Jacquemyn, Hans
    KU Leuven (NLD).
    Jakobsson, Anna
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Kalamees, Rein
    University of Tartu (FIN).
    Marrs, Rob H.
    University of Liverpool (GBR).
    Marteinsdóttir, Bryndis
    Soil Conservation Service of Iceland (ISL).
    Milberg, Per
    Linköping University (SWE).
    Pakeman, Robin J.
    James Hutton Institute (GBR).
    Phoenix, Gareth
    University of Sheffield (GBR).
    Thompson, Ken
    University of Sheffield (GBR).
    Vandvik, Vigdis
    University of Bergen (NOR).
    Wagner, Markus
    Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (GBR).
    Cousins, Sara A.O.
    Stockholm University (SWE).
    Eriksson, Ove
    Stockholm University (SWE).
    Ghorbani, Jamshid
    Sari Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources University (IRL).
    Jankowska-Błaszczuk, Małgorzata
    Jan Kochanowski University (POL).
    Klanderud, Kari
    Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NOR).
    Koch, Marcus A.
    Heidelberg University (DEU).
    Le Duc, Michael
    University of Liverpool (GBR).
    Lee, Hyohymi
    University of Liverpool (GBR).
    Meineri, Eric
    Mediterranean Institute of Marine and Terrestrial Biodiversity and Ecology (FRA).
    McAllister, Hugh A.
    University of Liverpool (GBR).
    Måren, Inger E.
    University of Bergen (NOR).
    Poschlod, Peter
    University of Regensburg (DEU).
    Rosenburgh, Angus
    Durham University (GBR).
    Rydgren, Knut
    Western Norway University of Applied Sciences (NOR).
    Töpper, Joachim P.
    University of Bergen (NOR).
    Auffret, Alistair G.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SWE).
    European soil seed bank communities across a climate and land-cover gradient2020Data set
    Abstract [en]

    This is the data set used for the publication Buffering effects of soil seed banks on plant community composition in response to land use and climate, published in the journal Global Ecology and Biogeography.

    Aim.

    Climate and land use are key determinants of biodiversity, with past and ongoing changes posing serious threats to global ecosystems. Unlike most other organism groups, plant species can possess dormant life-history stages such as soil seed banks, which may help plant communities to resist or at least postpone the detrimental impact of global changes. This study investigates the potential for soil seed banks to achieve this.

    Location. Europe

    Time period. 1978 – 2014

    Major taxa studied. Flowering plants

    Methods.

    Using a space-for-time/warming approach, we study plant species richness and composition in the herb layer and the soil seed bank in 2796 community plots from 54 datasets in managed grasslands, forests and intermediate, successional habitats across a climate gradient.

    Results.

    Soil seed banks held more species than the herb layer, being compositionally similar across habitats. Species richness was lower in forests and successional habitats compared to grasslands, with annual temperature range more important than mean annual temperature for determining richness. Climate and land use effects were generally less pronounced when plant community richness included seed bank species richness, while there was no clear effect of land use and climate on compositional similarity between the seed bank and the herb layer.

    Main conclusions.

    High seed bank diversity and compositional similarity between the herb layer and seed bank plant communities may provide a potentially important functional buffer against the impact of ongoing environmental changes on plant communities. This capacity could, however, be threatened by climate warming. Dormant life-history stages can therefore be important sources of diversity in changing environments, potentially underpinning already observed time-lags in plant community responses to global change. However, as soil seed banks themselves appear, albeit less, vulnerable to the same changes, their potential to buffer change can only be temporary, and major community shifts may still be expected.

    Methods

    This dataset is a collection of 41 published and 5 unpublished data sets, consisting of 2796 plots with corresponding seed bank and herb layer community data. Sampling effort varied across data sets, but involved sampling of the soil and subsequent germination trials in a greenhouse to determine seed bank composition. Herb layer communities were determined by the identification of plants in relevés. Please consult the readme file and published paper for further details.

    Usage Notes

    Please contact database or individual data set authors for further information and collaboration when using the data set or any of its component parts. Please also note that some of these data sets have already been published alongside their orginal papers. Finally, please cite data and datasets according to community standards.

1 - 4 of 4
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