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  • 1.
    Amoson, Jonas
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Computer Science and Informatics.
    Building complex GUIs in Plan 92009In: Proceedings 4th International Workshop on Plan9, Athens, GA: University of Georgia , 2009, p. 15-21Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    How can non-trivial graphical user interfaces be designed in Plan 9 without them losing their minimalistic style? Different toolkits are discussed, and a proposal for a tabbed toolbar is suggested as a way to add functionality without cluttering the interface and avoiding the use of pop-up dialog boxes. A hypothetical port to the GUI in LyX is used as an example.

  • 2.
    Arvola, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Information and Computer Science,Linköping, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Marcus
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division for Educational Science and Languages.
    Nordvall, Mathias
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ragnemalm, Eva L.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Simulated Provocations: A Hypermedia Radio Theatre for Reflection on Classroom Management2018In: Journal Simulation & Gaming, ISSN 1046-8781, E-ISSN 1552-826X, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 98-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Learning to manage a classroom is a difficult but important part of teacher education. Earlier research on simulations for learning classroom management has highlighted the difficulty of supporting reflection.Purpose. This case study explores and evaluates the design of a simulation for student teachers' reflection on classroom management.Design. The design process resulted in the scenario-based SIMPROV simulation, which was made in the form of a hypermedia radio theatre that students go through in pairs or triads. Authoritarian, authoritative, democratic, and compliant leadership styles were built into the choices student teachers made.Evaluation. The simulation was evaluated in two courses where the participants' level of reflection and perceived knowledge improvement was measured using a questionnaire. Forty-three first-year student teachers, 48 third-year student teachers, and 38 of the student teachers' mentors participated in the evaluation.Results. The results indicate that participants engaged in reflection and understanding to a high degree, and only to a low degree in critical reflection or habitual action.Conclusions. The conclusions are that the scenario-based simulation designed as a hypermedia radio theatre supported knowledge improvement, understanding, and reflection and that social interaction during and after simulation sessions was an important feature.

  • 3.
    Christiernin-Gustafsson, Linn
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Manufacturing Processes.
    Människor, Robotar och Maskiner2014In: Fokus Industri : Den svenska ekonomins motor, no November, p. 22-22Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Ghorban, Maryam
    University West, Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, Division of Psychology and Organisation Studies.
    Människa – Teknik – Organisation ur ett utredningsperspektiv: En intervjustudie av medarbetare vid Statens haverikommission2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Human - Technology - Organization (HTO) is a well-established, general unifying concept in the Swedish Accident Investigation Authority (SHK) that represents an approach, knowledge and use of various tools regarding interactions between people, technology and organizational factors. The HTO-perspective is well described in literature but there are few studies on how SHKs staff experiences working according to this method in their investigations. The aim of this study was therefore to describe their HTO-perspective, examine how it is used in the investigations at SHK and describe the investigators experience of working with the HTO-perspective as well as the method's usefulness compared to old methods in accident investigations. A literature study has been conducted in the areas of HTO, Theory of planned behavior (TPB) and safety culture. TPB and safety culture are described in this paper since they highlight the different aspects of a HTO-perspective. The hypothesis was answered by using semi-structured interviews. The interviews were analyzed by a content analysis and themes were identified. Furthermore the material from the interviews was subsequently structured through a Strength – Weakness – Opportunities – Threats analysis (SWOT), i.e. the informants' view on the HTO-perspective was structured based on the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats SHKs staff experience that the method has in the investigative work. The informants consisted of two investigators at SHK who 3have worked with accident investigations for a long time in various roles. The results yielded that the investigators had a positive attitude towards conducting investigations according to the HTO-perspective because they feel that this perspective provides them with cross-competence. A flaw is though that the perspective lacks a structured approach. As a result of this, the investigators own experiences and expertise play a major role in the quality of the investigation. As the study's aim is met and the informants are considered to be experts the validity requirements are also fulfilled.

  • 5.
    Gustavsson Christiernin, Linn
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production System.
    How to describe interaction with a collaborative robot2017In: HRI '17 Proceedings of the Companion of the 2017 ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction, 2017, p. 93-94Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we describe early work on a classification model on how to interact with industrial and other types of robots. We suggest a classification for how to describe different scenarios within Human-Robot Interaction. The idea with this model is to help when identifying the gap between where a company is and where they would like to be when it comes to collaborative automation. © 2017 Author.

  • 6.
    Karlsson, IC MariAnne
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Division Design and Human Factors, Department of Product and Production Development, SE-412 96 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Engelbrektsson, Pontus
    Chalmers University of Technology, Division Design and Human Factors, Department of Product and Production Development, SE-412 96 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Larsson, Lena E.
    Region Vaestra Gotaland, Regionens hus, SE-462 80 Vaenersborg, Sweden.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Berndtsson, Bo
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT.
    Svensson, Lars
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Use-centred design of medical and healthcare technology: a pilot study of field tests as a development tool2011In: International Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Technology, ISSN 1752-6418, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 11-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the project has been to develop a process through which users, staff as well as patients, can be involved in field evaluations of medical and healthcare technology. Interviews with different stakeholders and the experiences from four case studies have led to the following conclusions. Users have the potential to act as active evaluators rather than passive subjects or participants only. However, user involvement in field evaluations must be supported by a formation of facilitators or 'door openers' to the healthcare organisation, moderators enhancing the dialogue between developers and users, and mentors for the users acting as evaluators

  • 7.
    Ljungdahl Eriksson, Martin
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Atienza, Ricardo
    University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pareto, Lena
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Falkenberg Hansen, Kjetil
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Swede.
    My sound space: An attentional shield for immersive redirection2018In: AM'18 Proceedings of the Audio Mostly 2018 on Sound in Immersion and Emotion: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, Association for Computing Machinery , 2018, article id a9Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the context of extended reality, the term immersion is commonly used as a property denoting to which extent a technology can deliver an illusion of reality while occluding the users’ sensory access to the physical environment. In this paper we discuss an alternative interpretation of immersion, used in the My Sound Space project. The project is a research endeavor aiming to develop a sound environment system that enables a personalized sound space suitable for individual work places. The medium, which in our case is sound, is transparent and thus becomes an entangled part of the surrounding environment. This type of immersion is only partly occluding the users sensory access to physical reality. The purpose of using the sound space is not to become immersed by the sounds, rather to use the sounds to direct cognitive attention to get immersed in another cognitive activity. © 2018 Association for Computing Machinery.

  • 8.
    Mark, Emil
    University West, Department of Engineering Science.
    Usability: Through the use of guidelines and user participation2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Department of Engineering Science at University West in Trollhättan was in need of a new system for scheduling personnel, as the existing system is based upon an Excel-file and is hard to work with and does not provide an easy way for the users to collaborate.The purpose of this study was to examine how existing principles and guidelines regarding interface design can be used to create a new web based system with a high usability. The purpose is also to examine how participatory design affects the design process and outcome.To create a system with a high grade of usability, a number of existing rules and guidelines regarding usability and a number of subjects regarding interaction design, were used by the development team as tools.Even though the study showed that usability guidelines can be a valuable tool and provide a good foundation it is important to emphasize the use of other techniques. For example the use of participatory design, which in the study was found to be of great value to the development team.

  • 9.
    Norström, Livia
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Arghavan Shahlaei, Charlotte
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Johansson, Lars-Olof
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Islind, Anna Sigridur
    Reykjavik University, School of Computer Science, Iceland.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    New Logics of Ethics in the Age of Digital Platforms: Design Fictions of Autonomous Cars2019In: Proceedings of the 17th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work-Demos and Posters, European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies (EUSSET) , 2019, Vol. 3Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autonomous cars are the first major examples of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in everyday life. When cars are transformed into platforms,new service relationships emerge between car companies and the car users. These relationships generate gains and catches for both parts related to how physical and non-physical resources are exchanged in the sharing economy; how integrity is negotiated; and how responsibility is delegated when AI enables the car to take over most of the driving. With a "car as a platform approach", in this paper, we present a design fiction on ethical implications for citizens' daily lives with autonomous cars

  • 10.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Ekström, Sara
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Barendregt, Wolmet
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Applied IT, IT Faculty,Sweden .
    Serholt, Sofia
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Applied IT, IT Faculty,Sweden .
    Kiesewetter, Svea
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Applied IT, IT Faculty,Sweden .
    Augmenting Game-Based Learning With a Robot Tutee2019In: Proceedings of the European conference on games-based learning, Reading: Academic Publishing International, 2019, p. 560-568Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the initial design of an educational setup where a humanoid robot is used as a game companionto a child while they play an educational arithmetic game together. Drawing on the learning-by-teaching paradigm, therobot’s purpose is to act as the child’s tutee and ask questions related to gameplay and the arithmetic content of the game. The original version of the game utilized a virtual teachable agent, which was shown to be effective for children’s learning in previous studies. Here we replace the virtual agent with a social robot to explore if and how the embodiment and social-like behaviour of robots can augment game-based learning further. Our aim is to design a robot tutee that will enhance the game experience and stimulate elaboration of the game’s learning material. So far we have conducted two design workshops with 81 schoolchildren in grades 2 and 4 where they experienced the robot and the game in their classrooms. In this paper, we present the results of two post-workshop questionnaires, where the children were asked about desired behaviour for learning companions and their experiences with the robot as a game playing tutee. The first post-workshop questionnaire revealed that children would like to have a robot tutee that behaves as a kind and helpful human peer, but with improved capacities such as being kind to everyone, providing better explanations, and giving more compliments. The second postworkshop questionnaire revealed that the children accepted the tutor–tutee role-division and that a majority of children were able to hear, but less so, understand, the robot’s questions. Implications of these findings for design of the robot tutee are discussed

  • 11.
    Pareto, Lena
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Division of Media and Design.
    Lundh Snis, Ulrika
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Understanding users with reading disabilities or reduced vision: Toward a universal design of an auditory, location-aware museum guide2006In: International Journal on Disability and Human Development, ISSN 2191-1231, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 147-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present ongoing work on the design of an information system for users with reading disabilities and users with reduced vision. The design target is a portable, auditory, location-aware information system, to complement visually displayed information in exhibitions. Applying a user-centered, we identify non-typical user-groups’ specific requirements, which are turned into a design. The first design-iteration, which includes a formative evaluation, using a mock-up prototype, with dyslectic and visually impaired participants, is completed. The evaluation indicates that the user-group’s specific aspects we have identified are relevant, while designing for these groups. © 2006, by Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. All rights reserved.

  • 12.
    Sjölie, Daniel
    et al.
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Informatics.
    Badylak, Sebastian
    Falmouth University Falmouth, United Kingdom.
    Mind tricks for presence2019In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series: 14th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games, FDG 2019, ACM Publications, 2019, article id 47Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As virtual and mixed reality (VR/MR) technology moves steadily towards general availability accessible descriptions of the surrounding theory is desirable. An initial focus on high-level concepts can provide common language for diverse teams, including artists, designers and engineers, helping them to quickly get a sense of basic principles and gain a familiarity with related research for further study. The concepts of synchronized reality and grounded simulation are introduced as helpful starting points for thinking about the design and development of mixed reality systems with optimal presence. This paper provides case studies where recent commercial VR applications are analyzed with the proposed principles in mind, in an attempt to illustrate to developers how to think about design of mixed reality games for optimal presence. © 2019 ACM.

  • 13.
    Wynn, Eleanor
    et al.
    Ronin Institute, USA.
    Vallo Hult, Helena
    University West, School of Business, Economics and IT, Divison of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics.
    Qualitative and Critical Research in Information Systems and Human-Computer Interaction: Divergent and Convergent Paths2019In: Foundations and Trends® in Information Systems, ISSN 2331-1231, Vol. 3, no 1-2, p. 1-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information Systems (IS) and Human Computer Interaction(HCI)–including Computer-Supported Cooperative Work(CSCW)–address the development and adoption of computingsystems by organizations, individuals, and teams. Whileeach has its own emphasis, the timelines for adopting qualitativeand critical research differ dramatically. IS used bothin the late 1980s, but critical theory appeared in HCI onlyin 2000. Using a hermeneutic literature review, the papertraces these histories; it applies academic cultures theoryas an explanatory framework. Institutional factors includeepistemic bases of source disciplines, number and centralityof publication outlets, and political and geographic contexts.Key innovations in IS are covered in detail. The rise ofplatformization drives the fields toward a common scopeof study with an imperative to address societal issues thatemerge at scale.

1 - 13 of 13
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